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How Curation can scale

How Curation can scale | Cooperation and collaboration | Scoop.it

This is a very interesting piece by Erin Griffith (again!) on the potential scalability issues of content curation. You can pass quickly on her first part where she easily bashes the usual concerns about the curation word being overhyped and over used.

 

She makes a really good point on her second part, building on the experience of Behance, the platform to publish one's creative work: using a mix of algorithms and human curation is a part of the answer to this scale issue. 

 

But another way to scale curation is to add a topic-centric layer. In the problem she describes (which is typically Behance's problem), scaling up is tough because curation is being applied to sort out the best content on a unique dimension: a home page that's the same for everyone. "Behance’s front page could no longer display what algorithms determined was the most popular art within [the] site’s community. Because of boobs. They are universally the most popular thing on the Web, and not even a tasteful, creative site like Behance is safe when the “wisdom of the crowd” is involved. To be clear — boobs are welcome on Behance, but the site skews toward commercially viable work. A porn pit may entice creative directors but not in the way Behance wants to entice them." she funnily writes.

 

If you added topics to that, you can solve the problem by having people follow whichever topics they want. And I'm not talking about the usual 10-20 categories you find on any content sites. I'm talking about long-tail, user-created topics that any user can opt in to follow or unfollow. Boobs fans can then follow dozens of Boobs topics curated by other fellow users without having to pollute the experience for everyone else.

 

By mixing a topic-centric model with curation, you apply it to as many dimensions as your users will decide to curate. That's the model we've been using at Scoop.it and so far, it scales pretty well, doesn't it?


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Framework: Collaborative Economy Honeycomb | Web Strategy by Jeremiah Owyang | Digital Business

Framework: Collaborative Economy Honeycomb | Web Strategy by Jeremiah Owyang | Digital Business | Cooperation and collaboration | Scoop.it

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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, May 6, 2014 1:31 PM

An insightful infographic, backed up with stats, by a savvy group of social media analysts (thousands of people claim to be social media experts, but Owyang, Gansky,Gorenflo,  Solis, Samuel, and others really know their material. Collaborative economy is about ways that digital media enable people to interact economically in ways and at scales that were not before possible.

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Social Curation Is The Future of Successful Community Engagement

Social Curation Is The Future of Successful Community Engagement | Cooperation and collaboration | Scoop.it

What is Social Curation? Social curation involves aggregating, organizing and sharing content created by others to add con...


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Joyce Valenza's curator insight, March 6, 2013 7:42 AM

add your insight...

 

Benilda Pacheco Beretta's curator insight, March 10, 2013 3:24 AM

add your insight...

 
Dawn Adams Miller's curator insight, April 13, 2013 11:22 AM

This is definitely a major role for a community manager which is why I love learning about these two topics: community management and curation.  They are inseparable.  I think this is what makes the difference between a community that has members and a community that has ACTIVE members, which, of course, is the POINT!  Enjoy!

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How about some principles…

How about some principles… | Cooperation and collaboration | Scoop.it

Excellent principles from Carl Haggerty for development of communities, networks, public services, social organisations

Carl writes:

I’ve been wondering for a while now what actually needs to start happening or what would need to happen in order for communities and local government to start addressing the predicted financial meltdown.

 

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How To Start Curating Content: Tips and Tools Advice from Amy Schmittauer

Robin Good: Amy Schmittauer has some good basic tips if you are new to content curation and are curious to know which tools you could use to get your feet wet.

 

In this yet undiscovered three-minute video from this past summer, Amy introduces and explains the pros and cons of using Paper.li, Storify and Google Alerts.

 

Useful for beginners. Informative. 7/10

 

Original video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iSRd8mK5KI&feature=colike


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Content curation: make it part of your content strategy | Freelance Marketing Blog

Content curation: make it part of your content strategy | Freelance Marketing Blog | Cooperation and collaboration | Scoop.it

If you're not convinced yet, freelance Content Marketer and blogger Mike Farmer has some interesting points for you.

 

One thing I would add to his post is the importance of creating a Content Curation hub to really capture the benefits of your Content Curation efforts. Sharing links is just not going to be enough: in a world where tweets have a very short lifetime, you need to give your curated content a second chance by putting it on a curation layer where it can be discovered from search and from people with similar interests. 

 

This can be a blog, a site or a Scoop.it page but if you're going to make content curation part of your content marketing strategy, you will need that long term repository that social networks don't bring.


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ben bernard's comment, January 9, 2013 11:56 PM
thanks ! http://www.scoop.it/t/direct-marketing-services my newly made scoop.it :)
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Why your knowledge-sharing portal will probably not save the world | Kirsty Newman

Thanks Peter for this ...

"The Internet is littered with abandoned knowledge-sharing portals, so what questions do you need to ask before jumping in and setting up a new one? Kirsty Newman lists four questions to ask before setting up your knowledge sharing one-stop shop."

 

Comment: this prompted more questions than a simple comment allows me to phrase. In essence, I think what Kirsty says makes a lot of sense, also from the experience we have with setting up and maintaining learning networks. See for further details my blogpost at http://pbsloep.blogspot.com.au/2012/11/about-setting-up-learning-network.html


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David Garcia's comment, November 6, 2012 12:27 PM
Yes, a lot of questions. That I must answer, now that I have created a platform. Thank you.
Peter B. Sloep's comment, November 6, 2012 5:29 PM
Of course, don't get discouraged by these notes. It is just that the optimism that people will flock to a portal once it is there, is naive. But if a portal is the best choice, then so be it. My group built a portal for a group of public libraries in the Netherlands (www.biebkracht.nl) and it works, but also takes a lot of work to keep it working. Gilly Salmon's book on e-tivities contains some useful hints, but someone like Jenny Preece long time ago already hinted to this when she discussed lurking.
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What Kind Of Curation Site Should You Use?

What Kind Of Curation Site Should You Use? | Cooperation and collaboration | Scoop.it

Deanna Dahlsad designed this simple decision-tree to help differentiate between different Content Curation platforms and which one you should use as a business user.

 

I found this interesting as it's one of the first ones I see that made this obvious and simple differentiation between the different platforms out there. I'm not sure I would describe Scoop.it as article-based (we obviously have large pictures, infographics, videos or SlideShare presentations that are not articles) but I can see where she's coming from and her intention: if the content you curate is not 100% image, "image-based eye-candy" is not enough.  


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Deanna Dahlsad's comment, October 5, 2012 1:27 AM
Thank you for scooping my article and decision tree! Most content curation sites do offer images, as I noted; but there are distinct differences between image-based sites like Pinterest & sites like Scoop.It especially in terms of users.
Chris Lott UAF's comment, October 5, 2012 1:31 PM
The decision tree here represents our decisions on what curation technology to use as an educational organization. It's a great starting point for discussion.
Guillaume Decugis's comment, October 9, 2012 9:53 PM
Hi Deanna - Yes, I found it was a great one. By the way, I was thinking of using it in a future presentation. Would you be ok with that? I'd of course include the reference to your site that's on the original picture. Let me know. Thanks!
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Why people don't use collaboration tools | Online and or Blended Learning

Why people don't use collaboration tools | Online and or Blended Learning | Cooperation and collaboration | Scoop.it
Shawn Callahan, Founder of Anecdote shares observations around why people don't use collaboration tools effectively in this guest post.
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Making sense of the world : RSA blogs

Making sense of the world : RSA blogs | Cooperation and collaboration | Scoop.it

Ben Dellot writers:

Occasionally it can feel as though there are a thousand and one ways of making sense of the world. That is, of understanding why people think and behave in the way that they do and of knowing what can be done to help people live the lives they want to lead. Not a month goes by without the publication of another book telling us about the most important thing we need to know if we want to solve our problems – be it the importance of willpower, the power of ‘influencers’, the art of taking things more slowly, or of the significance of ‘group-identity’ and belonging.
At the RSA, there are a few lenses that are either dominant or emerging. Here’s a brief summary of three - culutral theory, mental complexity, Values Modes

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Curators Create The Metadata Needed To Enable Our Emerging Collective Intelligence

Curators Create The Metadata Needed To Enable Our Emerging Collective Intelligence | Cooperation and collaboration | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Participatory culture writer and book author Henry Jenkins interviews cyberculture pioneer Howard Rheingold (Net Smart, 2012) by asking him to explain some of the concepts that have helped him become a paladin of the  and "new literacies" so essential for survival in the always-on information-world we live in today.

 

This is part three of a long and in-depth interview (Part 2, Part 1) covering key concepts and ideas as the value of "community" and "networks", the architecture of participation, affinity working spaces, and curation.

Here is a short excerpt of Howard response to a question about curation and its value as both a “fundamental building block” of networked communities and as an important form of participation:

 

Howard Rheingold: "...at the fundamental level, curation depends on individuals making mindful and informed decisions in a publicly detectable way.

 

Certainly just clicking on a link, “liking” or “plussing” an item online, adding a tag to a photograph is a lightweight element that can be aggregated in valuable ways (ask Facebook).

 

But the kind of curation that is already mining the mountains of Internet ore for useful and trustworthy nuggets of knowledge, and the kind that will come in the future, has a strong literacy element.

 

Curators don’t just add good-looking resources to lists, or add their vote through a link or like, they summarize and contextualize in their own words, explicitly explain why the resource is worthy of attention, choose relevant excerpts, tag thoughtfully, group resources and clearly describe the grouping criteria."

 

In other words, "curators" are the ones creating the metadata needed to empower our emerging collective intelligence.

 

Curation Is The Social Choice About What Is Worth Paying Attention To.

 

Good stuff. In-depth. Insightful. 8/10

 

Full interview: http://henryjenkins.org/2012/08/how-did-howard-rheingold-get-so-net-smart-an-interview-part-three.html

 

 


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Shaz J's comment, September 3, 2012 3:20 AM
You're welcome :)

It's interesting interesting that you mention POV and stance, as that is not something I had explicitly articulated for myself, but naturally it must be implicitly true. In that sense, it reminds me (again) that curation forces self-reflection in order to present the content better, and that can only be a good thing.
Liz Renshaw's comment, September 8, 2012 9:57 PM
Agree with posts about curation guiding self reflection. This interview in particular is top value and two of my fav people indeed.
Andrew McRobert's curator insight, August 19, 2014 8:43 AM

8. This links a series of three interviews quite lengthy but there is some insightful information for the novice in the digital information age. There is video links within the article, including a great question and answer with Robin Good on curation. The video brings a balance to this inclusion.

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Blue collar collaboration

Blue collar collaboration | Cooperation and collaboration | Scoop.it
When we speak of collaborative enterprise, or simply collaboration, we most often refer to knowledge workers. What does this mean? That "normal" employees are just robots capable of repeat Taylorist spots?
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The ART Of Collaboration (Collaborative Behaviours)

The ART Of Collaboration (Collaborative Behaviours) | Cooperation and collaboration | Scoop.it
If people are given the right tools and the right environment, will they spontaneously collaborate and share knowledge? Why do some people find it difficult to share and collaborate? Would incentives and rewards make a difference?

 

Steve Dale posted:

I was recently asked to present at the Knowledge and Innovation Network (KIN) summer workshop on the topic of “Collaborative Behaviours”. The slides I used have been posted to Slideshare and embedded at the end of this blog post. This post is a summary of the key points I made during my session.

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Giving more in a sharing economy

Giving more in a sharing economy | Cooperation and collaboration | Scoop.it

People’s surplus time is something we can make much more of, particularly with regard to the needs of older people who are isolated or who feel vulnerable. To capitalise on this resource we have to tackle those obstacles that reduce people’s propensity to offer their surplus time. The solutions may be many but include technologies that allow people to identify where their surplus time, however marginal, can be used to good effect, achieving a better connectedness between formal care, informal family care and other community support, enabling organisations and groups to increase mutual support within existing structures, changing the perception of what older people have to offer, and supporting people to create their own systems of informal support. For each of these proposals there is a practical agenda. Finally, and perhaps most difficult to attach practical actions, we need a different ‘meme’ for supporting people that helps people to understand it as an everyday action for everyone.

 


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A Good Introduction to Content Curation by Donna Papacosta [Video]


Robin Good: If you are new to it, here is a good 30-minute video introduction to content curation by Donna Papacosta. Why to do it, how to do it, what tools you can use to do it. All explained in clear, simple language. 

 

She says: "...the objective is not to find as much information as possible and to dump it on people... it is to find the best, most relevant content and to be discerning.

People will trust you if you are discerning."

 

Useful for beginners. 8/10

 

Original video: http://youtu.be/scrhXBLvH2w

 

 


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The Brainstorming Guide for the Developing World: CAT The Frog Open-Source Guide To Design Thinking

The Brainstorming Guide for the Developing World: CAT The Frog Open-Source Guide To Design Thinking | Cooperation and collaboration | Scoop.it

 

Robin Good: The Collective Action Toolkit is a downloadable PDF guide, that has been designed to help individuals living in third world communities, where it is much more difficult to form spontaneous groups that tackle specific problems, to learn techniques and methods that can aid them to get together and take action on specific issues.

 

"Want to figure out a way to help people in your community eat healthier? Have an idea for a small business?"

 

"This 72-page booklet that seeks to develop a universal framework for people of all ages and cultural backgrounds to tackle big problems in their communities.

 

Developed over the past year, the CAT contains nary a mention of design (or brainstorming). Instead, it relies on a simple vocabulary to describe skills like building a team, carrying out research, and developing solutions."

Source: http://www.fastcodesign.com/1671237/frog-creates-an-open-source-guide-to-design-thinking#1

 

The CAT manual provides a number of illustrated templates, examples and tips to get any collaborative action idea off the ground.

 

Download the PDF guide here: http://www.frogdesign.com/collective-action-toolkit

 

 


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Curation Is The New Black; But Will It Get In The Black?

Curation Is The New Black; But Will It Get In The Black? | Cooperation and collaboration | Scoop.it

"There’s a lot of talk about content curation; but is anyone making money?" asks Deanna Dahlsad on her blog. 

 

Though I can assure her we have plans to make some at Scoop.it (we've had premium offers from day 1 and they're ramping up very nicely), her focus is actually more on the curators themselves.

 

How can individual curators make money? She's not talking about brands or businesses who have an opportunity to get brand awareness or thought leadership out of this. She means the individuals who are willing to become professional curators and need to make some revenue  to justify it. Like some bloggers do. 

 

As I've outlined before, I think the answer will come from a mix of advertising (which can be promoted posts or sponsoring) and subscription revenue. This is not an original answer but we're starting to see some of our users do that:

- Check out http://hdslrnews.planet5d.com/ for an example of a sponsored topic;

- Some others want to be paid by their clients for their curation work and start to implement our privacy feature for that reason.

 

But maybe this picture needs to be looked at in a bigger way: in itself, blogging isn't either a massive revenue generation opportunity. There aren't that many blogging millionaires who make a fortune purely out of subscribing people to their blogs or selling ads on it. But most of the time, they're able to combine some direct revenue with offline or other services that their blogs help position and thus contribute to sell. 

 

Isn't combining that Content Marketing aspect of Curation with some direct revenue-generation the real winning bundle for Curators? What do you think?


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Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com's comment, October 3, 2012 8:31 AM
Indirectly I've monetized my use of Scoop.it by driving traffic to my websites. I'm working on a whitepaper that will explain how. Right now I'm still gathering analyitic results for it.
Guillaume Decugis's comment, October 3, 2012 9:37 PM
Looking forward to read that Brian! I'm curious what you guys think of a solution like http://linqia.com - we've been exchanging with their founders on whether it could be a good solution for our users or not. Nothing decided yet but as we're discussing monetization, I'd love to have your thoughts (or anybody else's interested in that).
Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com's comment, October 5, 2012 1:16 AM
I've always wondered about the legal part of putting ads with curated content. Say I scoop a New York Times article word for word and there is an ad displayed on Scoop.it with the copied article.
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Curate to change the world: by Beth Kanter

Curate to change the world: by Beth Kanter | Cooperation and collaboration | Scoop.it

Beth Kanter was talking about her new book today with co-author KD Paine at ZeroDivide office in downtown San Francisco. Both were great speakers: very passionate with great stories on how non-profits are changing the world and how measurement and social media help them achieve that.

Of course I had my book signed and I love what Beth came out with. Don't you?

 

PS: buy the book! It looks awesome.


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Beth Kanter's comment, October 18, 2012 12:10 AM
Thank you so much for coming to the book party - loved it ..
Guillaume Decugis's comment, October 18, 2012 11:32 AM
Thank you Beth! It was great seeing you and hearing you and KD speak: you seemed to have had a great time together writing the book and it came through really nice yesterday.
ben bernard's comment, January 9, 2013 11:50 PM
thanks ! http://www.scoop.it/t/direct-marketing-services my newly made scoop.it :)
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Social Collaboration: it’s the people not the technology, stupid! | Communities and Collaboration

Social Collaboration: it’s the people not the technology, stupid! | Communities and Collaboration | Cooperation and collaboration | Scoop.it

Excellent summary from Steve Dale of why tools alone don't make for collaboration. Attitudes, culture and network-building are key - as well as planning for the move to mobile and apps. Based on long experience of developing communities of practice as well as consulting.

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How Curation can scale

How Curation can scale | Cooperation and collaboration | Scoop.it

This is a very interesting piece by Erin Griffith (again!) on the potential scalability issues of content curation. You can pass quickly on her first part where she easily bashes the usual concerns about the curation word being overhyped and over used.

 

She makes a really good point on her second part, building on the experience of Behance, the platform to publish one's creative work: using a mix of algorithms and human curation is a part of the answer to this scale issue. 

 

But another way to scale curation is to add a topic-centric layer. In the problem she describes (which is typically Behance's problem), scaling up is tough because curation is being applied to sort out the best content on a unique dimension: a home page that's the same for everyone. "Behance’s front page could no longer display what algorithms determined was the most popular art within [the] site’s community. Because of boobs. They are universally the most popular thing on the Web, and not even a tasteful, creative site like Behance is safe when the “wisdom of the crowd” is involved. To be clear — boobs are welcome on Behance, but the site skews toward commercially viable work. A porn pit may entice creative directors but not in the way Behance wants to entice them." she funnily writes.

 

If you added topics to that, you can solve the problem by having people follow whichever topics they want. And I'm not talking about the usual 10-20 categories you find on any content sites. I'm talking about long-tail, user-created topics that any user can opt in to follow or unfollow. Boobs fans can then follow dozens of Boobs topics curated by other fellow users without having to pollute the experience for everyone else.

 

By mixing a topic-centric model with curation, you apply it to as many dimensions as your users will decide to curate. That's the model we've been using at Scoop.it and so far, it scales pretty well, doesn't it?


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Co-operation: from soft skill to hard skill | Harold Jarche

Co-operation: from soft skill to hard skill | Harold Jarche | Cooperation and collaboration | Scoop.it

Harold Jarche 2009

Co-operation is not the same as collaboration, though they are complementary. Collaboration requires a common goal while co-operation is sharing without any specific objectives. Teams, groups and markets collaborate. Online social networks and communities of practice co-operate. Working co-operatively requires a different mindset than merely collaborating on a defined project. Being co-operative means being open to others outside your group and casting off business metaphors based on military models (target markets, chain of command, line & staff).

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Reasons not to be cheerful: one, two, three. | Matthew Taylor's blog

Reasons not to be cheerful: one, two, three. | Matthew Taylor's blog | Cooperation and collaboration | Scoop.it

Matthew Taylor, CEO RSA;

In my forthcoming annual lecture I offer an explanation for our apparent inability to make progress on challenges most people would like to see addressed; like providing dignity and decent care for all old people, increasing social mobility or achieving a more sustainable model of economic growth. I argue that there are three basic sources of social power, hierarchical authority most often associated with the state, solidarity most often associated with community, and individualism most often associated with the market.

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Being a Digital Native Isn’t Enough

Being a Digital Native Isn’t Enough | Cooperation and collaboration | Scoop.it

It is our role as teachers to help students develop the skills to problem solve independently and collaboratively use 21st-century skills while not relying on technology to do all of the thinking for them. Just because these students are digital natives, does not mean that they do not need guidance to navigate the digital world–both in terms of learning how to discern important and relevant information from a large swath of data, and also to be able to inquire and solve problems that take time, thought, and energy.


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This Online Group Collaboration Hub Replaces Insecure Listservs

This Online Group Collaboration Hub Replaces Insecure Listservs | Cooperation and collaboration | Scoop.it
Groopt is an online group management platform. Members can chat, create documents, accept calendar invites and manage group payments.
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