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Εκπαιδευτικές Κοινότητες & Ιστολόγια ΠΣΔ | internet-safety | Activity

Εκπαιδευτικές Κοινότητες & Ιστολόγια ΠΣΔ | internet-safety | Activity | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it

Δικογραφία σχηματίσθηκε από τη Δίωξη Ηλεκτρονικού Εγκλήματος σε βάρος διαχειριστών ιστοσελίδας, για απάτη μέσω διαδικτύου: Ειδικότερα, η διερεύνηση της υπόθεσης ξεκίνησε από τη Δίωξη Ηλεκτρονικού Εγκλήματος, ύστερα από καταγγελίες πολιτών, οι οποίοι αν και είχαν παραγγείλει ηλεκτρονικές συσκευές, μέσω της συγκεκριμένης ιστοσελίδας, δεν τις παρέλαβαν ποτέ, ενώ σε επικοινωνίες που είχαν με τους υπευθύνους διαχειριστές, αυτοί προφασίζονταν διάφορους λόγους για τη μη παράδοση των προϊόντων. Η δικογραφία που σχηματίστηκε θα υποβληθεί στον κ. Εισαγγελέα Πλημμελειοδικών Αθηνών. Το Αρχηγείο της Ελληνικής Αστυνομίας, στο πλαίσιο της κοινωνικής ευθύνης, συνιστά και προτρέπει τους χρήστες του διαδικτύου: ...


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The History of the English Language: Infographic

The History of the English Language: Infographic | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
The English Language is icreasingly the language of Education and Business | The Brighton School of Business and Management
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Paula Silva's comment, March 4, 2014 6:51 AM
Will you check this scoop? Thank you so much. http://sco.lt/5okJ17
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How do you pronounce 'in excelsis'?

How do you pronounce 'in excelsis'? | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
Official site of The Week Magazine, offering commentary and analysis of the day's breaking news and current events as well as arts, entertainment, people and gossip, and political cartoons.

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6 Basic Activities Every Teacher Should Be Able to Do in Microsoft Classroom

6 Basic Activities Every Teacher Should Be Able to Do in Microsoft Classroom | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

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7 collaboration tools for the modern classroom

7 collaboration tools for the modern classroom | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
Technology and interactive tools can help support students as they develop expand their collaboration skills.

Via Grant Montgomery, Dean J. Fusto, Bhushan THAPLIYAL
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The Ultimate LinkedIn Cheat Sheet [Infographic]

The Ultimate LinkedIn Cheat Sheet [Infographic] | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
LinkedIn does much more than merely store your job profile. You can use the platform to make more connections, keep track of your relationships, build your career credibility, an
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How to Quickly Access Ten Google Sheets Templates for Teachers

How to Quickly Access Ten Google Sheets Templates for Teachers | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
Flippity is a great resource for G Suite users that I have been sharing with readers for a couple of years now. Flippity provide

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Why the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is the best thing ever

Why the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is the best thing ever | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
In this post, I'm going to explain why knowing the International Phonetic
Alphabet is like seeing the matrix.

A common misconception that linguists often have to deal with, be it from
students in Intro to Linguistics or from family members at holiday
gatherings, is that Language (capital L) is basically written language.
This has all kinds of ramifications, from people thinking that stylistic
conventions for writing are somehow "rules" that languages follow, to
thinking that people whose pronunciation differs significantly from what we
think of as being "how it's spelled" are somehow dumb.

But linguists know a secret: writing is a secondary technology, and spoken
language (as opposed to signed language) is all about sounds.

There are tons of different writing systems, and languages can be
represented --- well or poorly --- by many different systems. For instance,
Turkish was historically written using the Arabic abjad (basically an
alphabet that only has consonants), but is now written with roman letters.
Tajik is the same language as Farsi, but one's written in Cyrillic and one
in a modified abjad. Hell, people get tattoos in English that are written
in Tengwar (Tolkien's Elvish script). All these different scripts represent
sounds in ways that are sometimes more and sometimes less faithful to the
(abstract) sound units that a given language uses. For instance, standard
varieties of English have two sounds that we totally suck at writing, so we
just slap two letters together. For both of them. When you blow air between
your tongue and front teeth, whether your vocal chords are moving or not,
we just write it in English and call it a day, even though refers
to one sound and refers to another and this combination makes no damn
sense.

Rather than wade into the ridiculous morass of writing systems every time
we want to talk about a language, even if it's just to give one example
before moving on to other data from other languages, linguists have
developed basically the best tool ever: The International Phonetic
Alphabet.

How is it different than other alphabets? First, it's based on all the
different sounds that human mouths and vocal tracts can make, and second,
it's got one (and only one) character for each sound.

The beauty of it is that it is independent of accents, and in fact, you can
represent different accents clearly using the IPA. So every linguist's pet
peeve is reading language learning books that say things like "i as in the
i in kit." Well, that's great, except for different
accents/dialects/varieties of English pronounce the word "kit" differently.

So how does it work? Let's take a brief tour of SOUNDS YOU MAKE WITH YOUR
MOUTH AND STUFF:

Sounds You Make With Your Mouth (and Stuff)!

I'm going to simplify a lot of this discussion, so expect nitpicky comments
from fellow linguists about what really a consonant is, but basically, you
can divide the sound we make into two main classes, if you don't think too
hard about it:

1. Consonants
2. Vowels

Consonants, for our purposes, are basically any sound where the flow of air
out from your lungs is obstructed in some way. Vowels are sounds where air
flows freely.

Notice: I did not say "vowels are [insert list of letters (and sometimes
other letter!)]." I said "vowels are sounds where air flows freely."

The cool thing is that each of these two classes can be completely
described (for our purposes, again), using 3 parameters.

For Consonants:
1. place
2. manner
3. voicing

Let's take these one at a time.

Place is the location of the obstruction of airflow. This can be closure at
the lips, the tongue at the teeth, at the alveolar ridge, at the hard
palate, the back of the tongue at the velum, etcetera.

Manner is the way airflow is obstructed. If it's completely blocked off,
it's a "stop." If it's just partially blocked and creates a turbulent
airflow, it's a "fricative" (think "friction").

Voicing refers whether your vocal chords are vibrating.

Places. In your mouth.

Armed with these three, we can start specifying sounds. For instance, the
in is a unvoiced coronal stop (it's not voiced, it's made with
the "crown" of the tongue -- that is, the tip -- and airflow is completely
stopped for a second. Technically, less than a second, but whatever).

Since we can characterize all the meaningful units of sound that a language
uses in this way (#thatsThePoint), wouldn't it be nice if there were one
and only one symbol for that sound? GOOD NEWS: THERE IS! And, since the IPA
was made up by a bunch of Europeans, it's exactly what we'd expect: . If
it were voiced? . If it was in the same place, unvoiced and a fricative?
. Voiced? . Same manner and voicing (stop, unvoiced), but made at the
lips?

.

What's really amazing about this, and will be the subject of a different
post, is that the way languages work seems to be by reference not to
spelling and stuff, but to these sub-classifications of sound, which we
call distinctive features because (1) they're features that (2)
distinguish sounds from one another. In fact, languages tend to change
based on natural classes of these features. For instance, some sound change
might affect all stops, but not fricatives.

The IPA chart for consonants can be found on Wikipedia here, and you can
click on each symbol and hear the audio. In fact, each sound has its own
wikipedia article.

Similarly, vowels can be classified along three parameters:

For Vowels:
1. Tongue Height
2. Tongue Backness
3. lip rounding

Height refers to how high the body of your tongue is in your mouth.

Backness refers to how far front or back the highest point of your tongue
is (again, a simplification, but basically right).

Rounding refers to whether you round your lips or not.

Vowel chart, and schematic of tongue height for front vowels.

So for instance, linguists interested in dialects of American English may
talk about whether a particular variety, say California English, is
fronting /u/ to [ʉ] or even [y] and this is meaningful -- we're describing
an accent, but doing so in a more precise way than if you were to say "it
sounds like 'kyewl' when they say 'cool'!"

Wikipedia, again, has a super useful chart, where you can hear the sounds.
It's the same as the above chart --- "front" vowels are on the left, "high"
vowels are on the top, and they come in pairs with the unrounded form on
the left and rounded on the right. Add a little tilda on the top of the
vowel (literally it's just a little n above the vowel) and you have a
nasalized vowel --- a vowel where your velum is dropped a bit and you allow
airflow out through your nose. French has a ton of these, so what's
written as is pronounced /ɔ̃/. Without the little squiggly, it's /ɔ/,
the vowel in a New York accent's "coffee" (/kɔfi/), as opposed to a
Canadian or Californian's "coffee" (/kɑfi/).

So how many vowels does English have? Well, most accents have 20, not 5.
And you can discuss them all using the IPA: bead = /bid/, bed = /bɛd/, bad
= /bæd/, and so on. If I boo someone, I /bu/ them, but someone from
California might /bʉ/ them, and we have a precise way of telling, and
discussing, the difference.

Some helpful observations

The IPA was designed to be intuitive, and useful. So most of the symbols
are exactly what you would expect. The vowels are a little more
complicated, but think about what would make sense for Europeans: /i/ is
the vowel in 'beat', and we have a special character for the sound in 'bid'
(it's /bɪd/). Consonants are basically what you'd expect, except is /j/
(like in German Ja!). That shitty combination in English of for a
voiced velar nasal is just one symbol, an with the tail of a ,
called engma: /ŋ/.

Brackets and slashes: Linguists use slashes to indicate a more abstract
level, and brackets to deal with the sounds that are actually made. So In
English /t/ can have a bunch of different realizations in speech:

* [t] in 'stop' [stɑp]
* [tʰ] in 'tap' [tʰæp]
* [ɾ] in American English 'butter' [bʌɾəɹ]
* [ʔ] (a glottal stop, the sound in the middle of 'uh-oh!') in Cockney
'butter' [bʌʔə]

and so on. Most normal people are just not aware of these differences, at
all (especially the first two, but put your hand directly in front of your
mouth an see how different the airflow is!).

Notice, too, that you can clearly represent accents using this tool.
'butter' is [bʌɾəɹ] in General American, but [bʌʔə] in Cockney, and
[bəˈtœʁ] in a bad French accent. With the slashes, we can just talk about
things that happen to (abstract) segments (of sound) in a language without
having to specify all the different little things that happen in specific
environments, and with the brackets we can get as specific as we want to,
so I might say 'specific' /spəsɪfɪk/ as [spəsiɪfɪˀ]. And once you know the
IPA, you can tell from that HOW I SOUND WHEN I SAY IT.

YOU CAN FREAKING SPELL ACCENTS.

With the IPA, we don't have to resort to all kinds of weird ways of talking
about things ("the vowel in a New York accent when they say 'coffee'" or
"the ü sound in German, if you know German," or "That thing that some
French people do when they say 'oui' in a nonstandard way.") We can just
use the IPA and talk about place, manner, and voicing, or height, backness,
and rounding (/ɔ/, /y/, and /ɕ/, for the previous long-winded and confusing
examples).

While it takes a little (let's be real, very little) effort to learn the
IPA, the payoff is immense for anyone who wants to learn another language,
learn another accent, or understand any discussion of sounds that humans
make in a clear and concise way. It's basically seeing the matrix.

 

-----

 

©Taylor Jones 2016

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Learning in the digital age - theory and practice

Learning technology is just about everywhere in education. Universities are replete with lecture capture tools, interactive media, web based content and person…

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Francisco Restivo's curator insight, December 8, 2015 5:33 PM

Great presentation by Steve Wheeler.

Arthur Correia's curator insight, December 8, 2015 6:47 PM

#edtech #digitaleducation #elearning #blendedlearning #flippedclasses

Nancy Jones's curator insight, December 31, 2016 11:39 AM
while this presentation is really quite in depth (74 slides) it covers some important points. Semms like something that would be interesting to share with colleagues as it really covers a number of topics that apply to modern learners.
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How To Use The Youtube Video Editor

How To Use The Youtube Video Editor If you have never been able to figure out how to splice a video using the youtube video editor, this video is for you

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GwynethJones's curator insight, January 8, 9:10 AM

Learn how to use the tools already built into YouTube!

Using with the kiddos would be a little more tricky - just depending on your school filter & policies

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Grammar Girl #550: Enormity or Enormousness? Badminton.

Now you can listen to the Grammar Girl podcast on YouTube! In this week's show, we talk about the difference between enormity an
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Here is a great Web tool for recording video lessons

Here is a great Web tool for recording video lessons | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it

"heLearnia is a virtual whiteboard that allows you to record video lessons using your voice while interacting with the whiteboard (write, draw, insert images). It even allows you to import your PPT presentation and convert it to a video lesson. theLearnia is free and. above all very simple to use ..."


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Won Ho's curator insight, January 7, 7:15 PM
It is simple way to create video. But I am using more complicated tool!
간단하게 동영상 저작에 이용할 수 있는 도구네요.... 저는 좀 더 복잡한 도구를 사용합니다~^^
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Why You Should Use Google Keep for Voice Notes

Why You Should Use Google Keep for Voice Notes | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
Most note-taking apps support voice memos as a way to dictate notes, but there's a good reason why you should prefer to use Google Keep.

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How To Add a Watermark to a Google Doc - BetterCloud Monitor

How To Add a Watermark to a Google Doc - BetterCloud Monitor | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
Marking Google Docs "confidential" may be easier than you think. Whatever your reason for watermarking, this step-by-step lesson shows you how it's done in Google Docs.

Via Skip Zalneraitis, Bonnie Bracey Sutton, Suvi Salo
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Lee Hall's curator insight, January 5, 10:41 AM
You can watermark your document with these step-by-step instructions.
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8 Great Google Extensions You Probably Didn't Know Existed

8 Great Google Extensions You Probably Didn't Know Existed | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
Google extensions

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Like correcting people? Then take up Latin. Why grammar Nazis aren't just annoying — they're often wrong

Like correcting people? Then take up Latin. Why grammar Nazis aren't just annoying — they're often wrong | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
Your devotion to unchanging grammar and spelling can be a very good and holy thing — just not in English
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Google Released A New 3D Digital Story Telling Tool

Google Released A New 3D Digital Story Telling Tool | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
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15 Excellent YouTube Channels for Language Teachers and ESL Learners

15 Excellent YouTube Channels for Language Teachers and ESL Learners | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

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English news and easy articles for students of English

English news and easy articles for students of English | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
We write news in three different levels of English. We want to help you understand English more. Now all students can enjoy reading and listening to news.

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5 New EdTech Tools for Teachers

5 New EdTech Tools for Teachers | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
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Dickie Wada Thomas's curator insight, January 9, 7:23 PM
Story Wars looks awesome for collaborative writing and engaging students. 
 
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An Excellent Infographic Featuring Basic Chromebook Tips for Teachers

An Excellent Infographic Featuring Basic Chromebook Tips for Teachers | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

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5 Education Pinterest Boards for Teachers via Lee Watanabe-Crockett

5 Education Pinterest Boards for Teachers via Lee Watanabe-Crockett | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
by Lee Watanabe-Crockett

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Bookmarking Librarian, GwynethJones
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GwynethJones's curator insight, January 8, 9:04 AM

Pinterest is  a very addictive.....but useful curation tool! 

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A Short History of the word "Tomboy" | English

A Short History of the word "Tomboy" | English | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
With roots in race and gender discord, has the “tomboy” label worn out its welcome? An Object Lesson.

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2 Ways to Publish eBooks from G Suite - via  EdTechTeacher

2 Ways to Publish eBooks from G Suite - via  EdTechTeacher | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
In this post EdTechTeacher Instructor Greg Kulowiec demonstrates how to publish eBooks from G Suite like Google Docs using ePub and Issuu.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Patrice Bucci's curator insight, January 6, 8:45 AM
I have to get more proficient at this stuff....
MFaculty's curator insight, January 7, 8:34 AM
Give your students the opportunity to publish their work to a larger audience, and ignight their interest in writing well! Particularly in genre such as fiction, poetry, and areas of self expression, students need more than their audience of one (you). 
Here is a simple means for sharing beyond you; and if they solicit feedback, they can improve their writing and perhaps find an untapped outlet for self expression!
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Classroom Deliberations - Lesson Plans on Current Issues in U.S. Politics

Classroom Deliberations - Lesson Plans on Current Issues in U.S. Politics | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
C-SPAN Classroom Deliberations is a good resource for teachers of U.S. history or civics. On the site you will find 34 lesson plan

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Student-Centered Classrooms with Google Classroom - Teacher Tech

Student-Centered Classrooms with Google Classroom - Teacher Tech | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
Google Classroom student centered tips: hear from students in the private comments and expect students to submit things that are different!

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A Handy Chart Featuring 9 Popular Latin Phrases for Research Students

A Handy Chart Featuring 9 Popular Latin Phrases for Research Students | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it
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