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TEFL & Ed Tech
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Curated by Evdokia Roka
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Rescooped by Evdokia Roka from TEFL Because Teachers Have Issues.
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Why games are good for learning?

Why games are good for learning? | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter, Manos Koutsoukos
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Francesco G. Lamacchia's curator insight, November 21, 2013 8:48 AM

Giocando....s'impara! 

Julio Cirnes's curator insight, November 25, 2013 12:46 PM

Please teacher, more games!

Ryan McDonough's curator insight, July 7, 5:19 AM

Self explanatory visual on the benefits of gaming as a means of learning. Outlined are the rewards, mastery, engagement, intensity, exercise, readiness, and competitiveness. These types of graphics need to be displayed in the classroom. There's always parents who are unsure of how gaming qualifies as teaching. Can't they just sit their kid in front of an iPad all day at home? Well, in the appropriate setting, with the right direction and guidance, games are certainly good for learning. Some people just don't know that from experience yet.

Rescooped by Evdokia Roka from Eclectic Technology
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“Ten Practices To Avoid In A Differentiated Classroom”

“Ten Practices To Avoid In A Differentiated Classroom” | TEFL & Ed Tech | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 28, 2013 7:30 PM

A great find from Larry Ferlazzo but what are the other five? A bit of research led me to a presentation by Rick Wormeli "Fair isn't always Equal: Assessment and Grading an a Differentiated Classroom" and sure enough the other five were located in the presentation. The are listed below:

* Assessing students in ways that do not accurately indicate students’ mastery (student responses are hindered by the assessment format)

* Grading on a curve

* Allowing Extra Credit

* Defining supposedly criterion-based grades in terms of norm-referenced descriptions (“above average,” “average”, etc.)

* Recording zeroes on the 100.0 scale for work not done

To check out the full presentation (and it is a long URL):

http://www.vashonsd.org/mcmurray/science/justin/Resources/Wormeli/Annual_Wormeli_Fair%20Equal.pdf.