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Ask Ray | Thoughts on the consequences of the elimination of aging | KurzweilAI

Ask Ray | Thoughts on the consequences of the elimination of aging | KurzweilAI | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it

What if humans were to completely eliminate the process of aging in, say, the next ten or twenty years (probably before the technological singularity)?

What would be the worldwide consequences of such a development? Would the elimination of aging, and thereby the elimination of death, ultimately, have good or bad consequences?

 

 


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Scott Baldwin's comment, April 10, 2013 12:25 AM
Well, I hate to suggest such horrible expectations, but I fear that the following would occur, over time: Overpopulation, insurmountable taxing of natural resources, mounting tensions leading to unbridled war, and more death than what happened naturally prior to the elimination of aging. I suspect that the only thing that could prevent these inevitabilities would be the development of space travel sufficient to reduce earth's bio-load, and the massive reduction of our collective carbon footprint by emerging green technology.
Scott Baldwin's comment, April 10, 2013 1:33 AM
Holy smokes, I did not click through to the actual article and the other responses, but it seems there are some similar thoughts.
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Scientists transplant neural stem cells from a monkey’s skin into its brain | KurzweilAI

Scientists transplant neural stem cells from a monkey’s skin into its brain | KurzweilAI | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it

University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists have transplanted neural cells derived from stem cells from a monkey’s skin into its brain and watched the cells develop into several types of mature brain cells.

After six months, the cells looked entirely normal, and were only detectable because they initially were tagged with a fluorescent protein.

 

 


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