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(New) Word Needed: On Analogue-Digital Fluidity » Cyborgology

(New) Word Needed: On Analogue-Digital Fluidity » Cyborgology | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it

When something that is not originally digital is converted to digital form, that thing has been “digitized”—but what do you call it when something that is digital is converted to analogue or material form? There was a discussion to this effect in my Twitter feed a few months ago, but I don’t recall that we ever came to consensus about a) whether there is a term for this, and if not, b) what that term should be.

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New World Notes: Why is Second Life Starting to Add Private Sims ...

New World Notes: Why is Second Life Starting to Add Private Sims ... | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it
Could be nothing, could be something, but in the last month, according to Grid Survey, Second Life has gained about 50 private sims: This is after many years of steady private sim loss, which has been the most worrying thing, ...

Via Dulcie Mills
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Learning in virtual environments: international conference at the University of Manchester

Dimensions of situated learning Prof. Liz Falconer's presentation at an international conference at the University of Manchester 14 March 2014


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Dr. Doris Molero's curator insight, March 25, 4:26 AM

Dimensions of situated learning 
Prof. Liz Falconer's presentation at an international conference at the University of Manchester 14 March 2014

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Minecraft Looks Better Than Ever

Minecraft Looks Better Than Ever | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it
"Sonic Ether's Unbelievable Shaders" is probably the most aptly-named mod I've ever seen.
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Needy robotic toaster sells itself if neglected (Wired UK)

Needy robotic toaster sells itself if neglected (Wired UK) | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it
A glimpse into a bizarro near-future, one where the internet of things leads not to harmoniously interconnected gadgets but rather a house full of junkies
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The New Rules of Robot/Human Society

As technology speeds forward, humans are beginning to imagine the day when robots will fill the roles promised to us in science fiction. But what should we be thinking about today, as robots like military and delivery drones become a real part of our society? How should robots be programmed to interact with us? How should we treat robots? And who is responsible for a robot's actions? As we look at the unexpected impact of new technologies, we are obligated as a society to consider the moral and ethical implications of robotics.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Why The Future Of Technology Is All Too Human

Why The Future Of Technology Is All Too Human | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it

While the past favored those who could retain and process information efficiently, the future belongs to those who can imagine a better world and work with others to make it happen.


Via Guillaume Decugis
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internetdoctor's curator insight, March 4, 5:53 AM

While I understand some people wish everything was a computer.  The vast majority of humans need a physical and emotional connection...something "artificial intelligence" cannot give you.

Francisco Restivo's curator insight, March 7, 4:07 AM

I believe that we have to recenter the human machine relationship, and this must be done from school, letting young kids learn that they control the machine, and not the other way round.

Computational thinking and critical thinking are for humans.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 10, 8:50 AM

Why The Future Of Technology Is All Too Human

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Singularity 1 on 1: It’s a shift in humanity, not in technology!

Singularity 1 on 1: It’s a shift in humanity, not in technology! | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it

Socrates of Singularity 1 on 1 interviews Alexander Hayes about drones, wearable technology, surveillance and human interatactions with modern and future technology, published on Feb 21 of 2014.


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Pierre Tran's curator insight, February 26, 5:08 AM

Pour Alexandre Hayes, la singularité n'est pas un changement dans la technologie, mais dans l'humanité

Rescooped by Amy Cross from 3D Virtual Worlds: Educational Technology
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Gamestar Mechanic

Gamestar Mechanic | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it

Gamestar Mechanic is a game and online game community designed to teach the guiding principles of game design and systems thinking. 


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David W. Deeds's curator insight, February 25, 8:26 AM

OK, it´s settled...gonna use Gamestar Mechanic next in the Computer Workshops.

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Which game just hit 100 million registered users? (Wired UK)

Which game just hit 100 million registered users? (Wired UK) | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it
The original version of Minecraft now has 100 million registered users
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Second Life Founder Pursues Second Chance

Second Life Founder Pursues Second Chance | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it
Second Life Founder Pursues Second Chance
InformationWeek
Second Life founder Philip Rosedale says he knows why the virtual world failed to achieve mainstream acceptance. He's got a plan to do it again, and do it right this time.

Via David W. Deeds
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, February 4, 4:52 AM

VWers, you've gotta read this! 

CherryNetwork's curator insight, February 4, 6:12 AM

Indeed a "must-read" article.

Chantal Harvey's curator insight, February 6, 11:15 AM

An off-the-shelf webcam captures the user's facial expressions and copies them to the avatar's own face, reproducing movements of the eyes, eyebrows, and mouth. For movement, point where you want to go. Or you can point at what you want to look at inside the virtual world.

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25 of Maine’s most beautiful places

25 of Maine’s most beautiful places | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it
Maine's a beaut. Ain't no doubt about it. She's smart, too, and has quite the personality, but we can't help stopping to stare at her rocky coast, cascading falls, and miles of mountaintops. No matter where you go in this state, there's something unique to gawk at, but we've culled together a list of some of the finest spots to get an eyefull of Maine.
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Rescooped by Amy Cross from Educational Technology - Yeshiva Edition
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7 Global Education Facts & Statistics That Reflect A Changing World

7 Global Education Facts & Statistics That Reflect A Changing World | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it
7 Global Education Facts & Statistics That Reflect A Changing World

Via Rabbi David Etengoff
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Old maps become 3D virtual worlds

Old maps become 3D virtual worlds | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it

The British Library has challenged video game design students to turn old maps and engravings from its collection into virtual worlds.

  


Via Tourism:Collaterals, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Second Life founder creates Glass Brain, a system that lets you explore your brain in real-time

Second Life founder creates Glass Brain, a system that lets you explore your brain in real-time | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it
Researchers have developed a new way to explore the human brain in virtual reality. The system, called Glass Brain, which is developed by Philip Rosedale, creator ...

Via Fernando José Cassola Marques
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Henrik Safegaard - Cloneartist's curator insight, April 13, 4:27 AM

Researchers have developed a new way to explore the human brain in virtual reality. The system, called Glass Brain, which is developed by Philip Rosedale, creator of the famous game Second Life, and Adam Gazzaley, a neuroscientist at the University of California San Francisco, combines brain scanning, brain recording and virtual reality to allow a user to journey through a person’s brain in real-time.


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Nacho Vega's curator insight, April 14, 12:22 PM

Gazzaley: “We have never been able to step inside the structures of the #brain and see it in this way. It is biofeedback on the next level..."

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King's College London develops skinsuit to prevent muscle and bone loss in space | GizMag.com

King's College London develops skinsuit to prevent muscle and bone loss in space | GizMag.com | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it

Researchers from King's College London, working with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), have produced a skinsuit which, if worn by astronauts in outer space, could counteract the degradation of bone and muscle mass during long term exposure to microgravity.

 

The gravity loading countermeasure skinsuit is a collaborative project with researchers from King's College London (KCL), working on a design provided by MIT with help from the European Space Agency (ESA). The goal of the project is to provide a more efficient method of maintaining bone and muscle mass during long term missions in space, aboard for example the International Space Station (ISS).

 

Having evolved under the pressure of Earth's gravity, human beings are not naturally suited to life in space, therefore upon reaching the ISS an astronaut's body attempts to adapt to the weightlessness of its new environment. There is no longer any need for the added strength required to move about on the Earth's surface and so the muscle and bone in the body begin to degrade due to atrophy, with the average astronaut losing roughly one to two per cent of bone mass per month in orbit.

 

Click headline to read more and view pix gallery--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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How Virtual Gaming Worlds Are Revealing the Nature of Human Hierarchies | MIT Technology Review

How Virtual Gaming Worlds Are Revealing the Nature of Human Hierarchies | MIT Technology Review | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it
The way players form into groups in online games reveals that hierarchies are an inevitable product of the human condition, say complexity scientists.
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Microsoft 'developing' virtual reality hardware for Xbox (Wired UK)

Microsoft 'developing' virtual reality hardware for Xbox (Wired UK) | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it
Xbox is thought to be developing virtual reality hardware of its own according to a source of the Wall Street Journal
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Doctors use Google Glass in a cancer surgery

Doctors use Google Glass in a cancer surgery | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it

Google Glass, the futuristic marvel developed by Google X released in February last year is apparently suited to the need of specialized users such as surgeons. Two physicians at Indiana University Health

Methodist Hospital Dr. Szotek and Dr. Jeff Browne have become the first to use Google’s wearable technology during their four-hour abdominal surgery procedure. Both the doctors used this miniature head-mounted computer to access the patient’s medical records and more as they removed out a tumor. Glass is controlled over voice activated menus and neither had to worry about any chances of infection


Via Alex Butler
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Virtual world of avatars replaced by a fresh reality on campus - FT.com

Virtual world of avatars replaced by a fresh reality on campus - FT.com | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it

Overall Second Life is widely viewed as having lost momentum since its early days. An article in The Atlantic magazine late last year said references to the virtual world on TV programmes and even the occasional Disney show “make the site seem like a refuge for creepers and only the dweebiest of dweebs”.

That is a little harsh, says Steve Mahaley, global practice lead in Duke Corporate Education’s design group, although he notes that “most of the academic institutions and other businesses [that used to have a presence on the site] have fled”. Duke CE, based in North Carolina, still has its island but has not used it for any work with clients for the past two years, he adds.

“Second Life is, in my view, a great place for individual role-playing and the arts, where there are a lot of cool things happening,” he says. “But it is not completely appropriate for business education.”

 


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Rescooped by Amy Cross from Educational Technology News
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Online and There Is No Choice

Online and There Is No Choice | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it

"In a recent consultant’s report, in a section where the discussion focused on online degree programs, the report noted that 34% of the master’s degrees in education are earned through online education.  I’m not surprised and I fully expect that this number will exceed 50% within the next five years.  What is surprising to me is that there is still so much resistance to this inevitable trend."


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What will life be like when digital brains outnumber humans?

What will life be like when digital brains outnumber humans? | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it
These days, people worry about robots stealing our jobs. But maybe we should be more concerned about massive populations of computerized human brains. Called "ems," these infinitely-reproducible brains could change the world. Here's what will happen when digital brains vastly outnumber biological ones.

Via Randy LaVigne
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Brain powered quadcopter | Science Nation

Brain powered quadcopter | Science Nation | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it

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The Robot Launch Pad's curator insight, February 11, 10:01 AM

More great drone news today! Hopefully, this project will enter the Drone Social Innovation Award!

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New website would create virtual avatar after death

New website would create virtual avatar after death | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it
One group is working on a concept that would let loved ones virtually interact with you after you die. From an old school chalkboard comes a futuristic idea, using technology to become immortal.
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Reading the web in virtual reality

Reading the web in virtual reality | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it

Via Miguel Mimoso Correia, Dulcie Mills
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Experimental contact lens aims to offer tactile sight for the blind

Experimental contact lens aims to offer tactile sight for the blind | cool stuff from research | Scoop.it

Researchers from the Faculty of Engineering at Israel's Bar Ilan University have developed a prototype contact lens that could enable the visually impaired to see the world in a whole new light. Developed by Professor Zeev Zalevsky, the contact lens processes digital images and translates them into tactile sensations which can then be felt on the user's cornea, allowing them to form a picture of their physical surroundings.

 

The system uses a smartphone or mounted camera to capture images that are then transformed into a form of electronic Braille. The lens, fitted with electrodes, then mechanically stimulates the cornea, enabling the perception of objects around the wearer.

 

 


Via Ray and Terry's
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