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Fulgurites

Fulgurites | Cool Science Stuff | Scoop.it

Fulgurites are the rocks that form when lightning strikes sand (there are other types as well) and forms a hollow tube.  Super cool! 


Via Seth Dixon
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Kimberly Hordern's comment, April 28, 2013 8:46 PM
I have never heard of these before. I thought it was really interesting how they a made. It is confusing however how the article talks about lighting being able to create these almost every time it strikes then how come they are not more common?
Seth Dixon's comment, April 28, 2013 9:02 PM
If you want to see how to coax nature into producing these things while watching a rom-com, see "Sweet Home Alabama" w/Reese Witherspoon.
Thomas D's comment, April 29, 2013 4:53 PM
I find this article very interesting, I have never heard about or seen this in my life. I had no idea that these types of things could be formed from a lightning strike. The article is a little confusing however saying that these can happen all the time. Maybe it’s because I’ve never seen a lightning bolt directly hit the ground in front of me and see the reaction of the earth. I just find it hard to see as this being the first time I would come across something like this.

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Nanoscale neuronal implant developed that accesses single neurons

Nanoscale neuronal implant developed that accesses single neurons | Cool Science Stuff | Scoop.it

A thin, flexible electrode developed at the University of Michigan is 10 times smaller than the nearest competition and could make long-term measurements of neural activity practical at last.

This kind of technology could eventually be used to send signals to prosthetic limbs, overcoming inflammation larger electrodes cause that damages both the brain and the electrodes.

 

The main problem that neurons have with electrodes is that they make terrible neighbors. In addition to being enormous compared to the neurons, they are stiff and tend to rub nearby cells the wrong way. The resident immune cells spot the foreigner and attack, inflaming the brain tissue and blocking communication between the electrode and the cells.

 

The new electrode developed by the teams of Daryl Kipke, a professor of biomedical engineering, Joerg Lahann, a professor of chemical engineering, and Nicholas Kotov, the Joseph B. and Florence V. Cejka Professor of Engineering, is unobtrusive and even friendly in comparison. It is a thread of highly conductive carbon fiber, coated in plastic to block out signals from other neurons. The conductive gel pad at the end cozies up to soft cell membranes, and that close connection means the signals from brain cells come in much clearer.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by Scott Boylen from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Fulgurites

Fulgurites | Cool Science Stuff | Scoop.it

Fulgurites are the rocks that form when lightning strikes sand (there are other types as well) and forms a hollow tube.  Super cool! 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kimberly Hordern's comment, April 28, 2013 8:46 PM
I have never heard of these before. I thought it was really interesting how they a made. It is confusing however how the article talks about lighting being able to create these almost every time it strikes then how come they are not more common?
Seth Dixon's comment, April 28, 2013 9:02 PM
If you want to see how to coax nature into producing these things while watching a rom-com, see "Sweet Home Alabama" w/Reese Witherspoon.
Thomas D's comment, April 29, 2013 4:53 PM
I find this article very interesting, I have never heard about or seen this in my life. I had no idea that these types of things could be formed from a lightning strike. The article is a little confusing however saying that these can happen all the time. Maybe it’s because I’ve never seen a lightning bolt directly hit the ground in front of me and see the reaction of the earth. I just find it hard to see as this being the first time I would come across something like this.