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There’s No "I" in Teacher: 8 Rules of Thumb for Collaborative Planning

There’s No "I" in Teacher: 8 Rules of Thumb for Collaborative Planning | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Teachers become learning designers when given the space to collaborate by (among other things) cultivating trust, keeping it simple, and ensuring that it's student relevant.
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8 Pathways to Every Student's Success

8 Pathways to Every Student's Success | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Welcome to our blog series on how to apply the principles of positive youth development: curiosity, sociability, resilience, self-awareness, integrity, resourcefulness, creativity, and empathy.
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Collecting the evidence

Collecting the evidence | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
“Too many teachers are totally absorbed in the process of teaching, by which is meant the ‘delivery of information,’ and are barely concerned with the proc
Cindy Riley Klages's insight:
It's not "taught" unless it's "learned."
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The Question Game: A Playful Way To Teach Critical Thinking

The Question Game: A Playful Way To Teach Critical Thinking | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
The Question Game: A Playful Way To Teach Critical Thinking
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8 Cool Mobile Apps Created by High School Students - EmergingEdTech

8 Cool Mobile Apps Created by High School Students - EmergingEdTech | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
One of my very favorite uses of technology in education is when it used by students to create things. There are so many ways to be creative with technology – writing, creating art work, composing music, creating web sites, developing presentations, and so on.

One of the most intense and potentially rewarding creative undertaking students can tackle is coding – developing their own programs! The resources available to help interested individuals learn how to code have never been better or more plentiful. Schools and teachers have embraced this as an opportunity, setting students up to learn coding (and some highly motivated students take it on themselves).

Via John Evans
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25 Common Core-Aligned Math Apps for Middle School Students From edshelf

25 Common Core-Aligned Math Apps for Middle School Students From edshelf | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
A collection of teacher-approved Common Core-aligned math apps for middle school students, such as Geoboard, Graphs, DragonBox, BrainPOP, and others.
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How to Take Notes, Ask Questions, and Share Them While Watching Video Lessons: Free Technology for Teachers

How to Take Notes, Ask Questions, and Share Them While Watching Video Lessons: Free Technology for Teachers | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
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Top 100 Free Education Sites

Top 100 Free Education Sites | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Last year, Help Teaching brought you our Top 100 Free Education Sites. Since technology and new websites are always being discovered we decided to update our list with some awesome new websites and new...
Cindy Riley Klages's insight:
Fabulous resources--all in one place!
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Best Education-Related Videos of 2014

Best Education-Related Videos of 2014 | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
I love end of year “best of” lists.  My own list is what I found to be the most powerful education related videos of 2014. They all, in some way, address the mind, heart, and spirit of education.  ...

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, December 18, 2014 9:44 PM

Finding great educational videos takes time...so I am always excited when I find a list of suggested video. Jackie Gerstein shares her top 11. They range from just over three minutes to about seventeen minutes. Below is  a list of the videos.

* Malala Yousuf Nobel Prize Speech

* Carol Dweck: The Power of Believing You Can Improve

* Sir Ken Robinson: Can Creativity Be Taught

* President Obama on the Whitehouse Maker Faire

* Toxic Culture of Education: Joshua Katz

* The necessity of the student voice | Catherine Zhang

* Rethinking Learning in the Digital Age – Mitchel Resnick

* If I Knew Then: A Letter to Me on My First Day Teaching

* Kid President Throws a Surprise Party for a Retiring Teacher

* Erzah French: Sportskid of the Year

* Malcolm Mitchell Book Club

You will find brief descriptions for most of these videos and I suspect that many will choose to watch all of them over a period of time. You may find one or two that would be great to share at a faculty meeting.

Meg Swecker's curator insight, December 19, 2014 1:03 PM

A 'must view' list of educationally related videos.

Simon Awuyo's curator insight, December 21, 2014 12:06 PM

The will to die for the child right is hyper-determination. It is not easy to pass through the valley of shadow of death but it is possible.

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The Most Important Skill for Science or Self-Improvement

The Most Important Skill for Science or Self-Improvement | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
If I could ensure that kids come away from science class with one thing only, it wouldn’t be a set of facts. It would be an attitude—something that the late physicist Richard Feynman called “scientific integrity,” the willingness to bend over backward to examine reasons your pet theories about the...

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 3, 7:45 PM

Have you heard about the concept of a paradigm shift? This happens when new information comes in that does not fit what we expected. Unfortunately in many cases we choose not to see this lack of fit, and ignore the information. This post looks at this type of issue but suggests that you have students look it as "surprises" and notes that "we need to actively look for signs that our assumptions are wrong..."

How can we do this? Try creating a "Surprise Journal" with your students. Based on one teacher who has done this consider having your students (and you) look for moments of "surprise." Have them respond to two questions:

* Why was this surprising?

* And what does that tell me about myself?

This teacher has collected over 1,000 moments of surprise and shares a few of them in this post.

Here is his statement about how it changed his classroom culture (quoted from the post):

“In the class culture, acknowledgement that you are mistaken about something has become dubbed a ‘moment of surprise’ (followed by a student scrambling to retrieve their journal to record it),” he wrote to me. “As this is much more value-neutral than ‘I screwed up,’ the atmosphere surrounding the topic is less stressful than in previous years.”

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Socratic Smackdown, a Game from the Institute of Play

Socratic Smackdown, a Game from the Institute of Play | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

"Teacher-tested, student-approved games for difficult-to-learn skills and concepts"

The visual above comes from the materials and there are additional strategies that are not shown.


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 8, 9:28 PM

Here is a print-and-play games from the Institute of Play that you may find helpful in your classroom.

Socratic Smackdown helps students practice "argumentation around any topic or text." You may use it to help students become self-directed learners. There is a great video that quickly walks you though the process and you may download a pdf that provides Game Basics, Game Play, Student Resources and Teacher Resources. This game is geared to students from Grades 6 - 12.

Below are some of the rules of the game (found in the pdf).

* Create teams of four to six players and provide a topic, text or issue that will be discusses as well as a question set

* Share that discussion skill strategies are part of the game

* Set chairs in fishbowl pattern when ready to start

* Choose one student from each team to play

* Have 2 or more students as scorekeepers who will use Socratic Smackdown Scorecards

* Coaching cards will be used by students not keeping score, or by all students after the end of the match (if all are also scoring)

* Students "play" for 6 minutes and Scorecards are collected

Playing Socratic Smackdown with students will help them develop discussion and debate skills, a component of Common Core Speaking and Listening,  and a rubric is also provided.

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, January 9, 5:34 AM

Método de Discusión ... socrático Smackdown, un juego en el Instituto de Reproducción |scoopit travésBethDichter http: //sco.lt / ...

Sue Alexander's curator insight, January 18, 2:10 PM

Thanks again Beth, for sharing your toys. Students learning critical thinking and CC literacy skills while having FUN? Yes!

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How Does a Child With Executive Functioning Issues Think Differently?

How Does a Child With Executive Functioning Issues Think Differently? | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Do kids with executive functioning issues have a "disorganized" mind? Find out if kids with executive functioning problems think differently and what can help.
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WeAreTeachers: 10 Surprising Ways to Use Instagram in the Classroom

Move over, Facebook—if you teach middle or high schoolers, you know that Instagram is one of the most popular social media channels for teens and tweens today.
Cindy Riley Klages's insight:
Make sure you know your system's policy on posting student pictures first!
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How Gratitude Makes Us, and Our Students, Better | Teaching the Core

How Gratitude Makes Us, and Our Students, Better | Teaching the Core | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
In my most personal post to date, I riff on near-death experiences, character strengths, and the successes and difficulties of always striving for growth.
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Top Ten Practices for Principals to Promote Literacy in School

1. Read, Read and Read Principals should not only be reading current research and resources about best practices in education, they should be reading children's books as well as reading for pleasur...
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10 Essential Brain Breaks For Surviving Winter

10 Essential Brain Breaks For Surviving Winter | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Winter as a teacher means many things: rejoicing over snow days, groaning when it's too cold to let students outside for recess, unprecedented classroom wiggles, the long stretch between winter break and spring break.
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I have just three words of advice | The Reflective Educator

The Reflective Educator: I have just three words of advice. Study your teaching.
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The 100 Best Children's Books of All Time

The 100 Best Children's Books of All Time | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
We rank lasting favorites for young readers, from "Madeline" to "The Lorax"
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8 Free Apps and Web Tools for Staying Organized in the New Year

8 Free Apps and Web Tools for Staying Organized in the New Year | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
The human brain can organize only so much data. Tools like 30/30, Pocket, and Sunrise can boost your ability to stay informed, connected, and on time.
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Heat-ometer for differentiated homework

Heat-ometer for differentiated homework | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
Cindy Riley Klages's insight:

Love this practical suggestion!

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:14 PM

Here is a great idea to provide differentiation in homework. The Heat-ometer provides four levels, from mild (not shown in the image above) to medium (also not shown) to hot and extra hot. each level is more complex than the previous level, and 3 options are provided for each level.

The designer of this image also provides links to the original design, which is located at Take Away Homework.

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Learning - How it Works & How to Do it Better

Learning - How it Works & How to Do it Better | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Full Article: http://trainugly.com/portfolio/learning/ Our brains our designed to learn the best when we're operating at the edge of our abilities, stretched...

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, December 21, 2014 8:49 PM

Learn why it is important to stretch your brain, to try new things (and to fail) and to continue to try and improve. Learn about our "Lizard Brain"  (also known as the amygdala),an important component of our brain that impacts how we learn, but the learning is related to the time when humans hunted in the wild. This part of the brain holds us back in many ways, and although it once protected us now it tends to hold us back.

What can we do about this? The video explores this and discusses some of the ways we can "dance" with this "Lizard Brain" and move from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset. For more information take the time to watch this video.

miracletrain 夢想驛站's curator insight, December 22, 2014 6:00 AM
Learning sweet spots!!!
Helen Teague's curator insight, December 23, 2014 9:28 AM

especially good at about 6 minutes in...  see also the trainugly.com website

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A Professional Learning Teacher Toolkit

A Professional Learning Teacher Toolkit | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
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Laura Rosillo's curator insight, December 3, 2014 12:57 PM

añada su visión ...

Betty Skeet's curator insight, December 6, 2014 6:17 AM

Adults toolkit for learning

Randy Bauer's curator insight, January 28, 1:39 PM

If you are providing online courses, or an information product, to adults this is a great reference.

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46 Hidden Tips and Tricks to Use Google Search Like a Boss: Infographic

46 Hidden Tips and Tricks to Use Google Search Like a Boss: Infographic | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

How often do you use Google to find something on the internet?

If like a lot of people you use Google every day you’ll be astounded by the number of hidden tips and tricks their search facility offers.

Find 46 of them featured in this infographic.


Via Lauren Moss
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Sarah McElrath's curator insight, January 9, 9:34 AM

students still need to be taught how to be effective searchers On Google. Here are some helpful tips/tricks to show them--and learn yourself.

Mayra.Loves.Books's curator insight, January 9, 10:38 AM

More Google search tips...

Kelly Coffee's curator insight, January 9, 10:46 AM

Nothing hidden about these "tips & tricks" - just standard every day library functions. This is not new, most these functions have been used since Win95, the days before we see the net as we do now. Nonetheless, whatever it takes for people to finally catch up and educate themselves about easier searching techniques! 

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Predicting Dyslexia — Even Before Children Learn to Read

Predicting Dyslexia — Even Before Children Learn to Read | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
New research shows it’s possible to pick up some of the signs of dyslexia in the brain even before kids learn to read. And this earlier identification may start to substantially influence how parents, educators and clinicians tackle the disorder.
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