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WeAreTeachers: 6 Ways to Sneak Vocabulary Instruction Into High School English

WeAreTeachers: 6 Ways to Sneak Vocabulary Instruction Into High School English | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Here are six creative ways to work more vocabulary instruction into your high school English curriculum.
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Overcoming Dyslexia

Overcoming Dyslexia | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Dr. Sally Shaywitz offers new facts — and new hope — about how every young child can become a better reader.
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Four Essential Principles of Blended Learning

Four Essential Principles of Blended Learning | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
As schools become more savvy about blended-learning tactics– the practice of mixing online and in-person instruction -- guidelines and best practices are emerging from lessons learned.
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WeAreTeachers: Menus, Movies, Social Media: 6 Amazing Writing Lessons to Try

WeAreTeachers: Menus, Movies, Social Media: 6 Amazing Writing Lessons to Try | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Six fresh writing and grammar lessons to try in your classroom. Includes reproducibles and printables for students.
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Lead writer responds to common Common Core English gripes - The Hechinger Report

Lead writer responds to common Common Core English gripes - The Hechinger Report | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

Q: As you were crafting the standards, what were the biggest issues in English and Language Arts education?

A: "Our charge was to use evidence from college faculty and employers to find the gap between students graduating from high school and students who were ready for college and the workplace on day one. We found there was about a four-year gap between the level of students graduating from high school and the requirements of college and the workplace. In college and on the job, you are asked a question and you are expected to support your answer with evidence. But we found that in order to answer about 30 to 70 percent of questions in high school textbooks students didn’t have to read the text. Many state assessments have questions like “Who is your hero?”, “Tell us about your summer,” or “What is your favorite place to go?” There is nothing wrong with those questions, but in those situations we ask students to do something we would never want them to do on the job – answer questions without having read anything."


Via Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, February 16, 6:00 PM

We don't often hear from the Common Core authors...and when we do...listening or in this case, reading,  might be in order. 

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31 Sources Of Royalty-Free Images - TeachThought

31 Sources Of Royalty-Free Images - TeachThought | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
In a digital world, images are everything–and that goes for the classroom, too.

Whether students are putting together a graphic design project, you’re starting a classroom blog, or your school needs access to high quality images for any number of teaching and learning needs, Creative Commons provides a useful common language for discussing what to use, when, and how, but it’s not an image library. (You can see a guide to Creative Commons licensing here.)

So where can you get the images themselves? Images that you can use to design, produce, create, and publish for the authentic project-based learning happening in your classroom? The collection below represents a very nice starting point to find the royalty-free image you’re looking for.

Via John Evans
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Karen Bonanno's curator insight, February 17, 3:31 PM

Royalty-free images - Creative Commons provides useful language to discuss what to use, how to use, etc 

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Nurturing the Middle School Mathematical Mind Infographic

Nurturing the Middle School Mathematical Mind Infographic | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

The middle school mind is…different.

As 13-year-old Logan LaPlante described in his Ted Talk Hack Schooling Makes Me Happy, “Neuroscientists say that the teenage brain is pretty weird: our prefrontal cortex is underdeveloped, but we actually have more neurons than adults, which is why we can be so creative, and impulsive, and get bummed out.” Truer words were never spoken around this subject.


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, February 17, 2:11 PM

How different is the mind of a middle school learner? This infographic is divided into the following sections:

* Who are middle school students?

* How do they learn?

* How can you teach to reach them?

* How can we change that statistic?

There is also a white paper that you can receive a copy of (although you will need to provide your contact information). The white paper, Nurturing the Middle School Mathematical Mind, will provide additional information.

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ReadWorks.org | New Paired Texts & Question Sets

ReadWorks.org | New Paired Texts & Question Sets | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
NEW Paired Texts! You’ll love this research-based reading comprehension curriculum. Check out ReadWorks.org!
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Training Volunteers

Training Volunteers | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Recently I’ve been working with some volunteers who wanted to read with students in a first-grade classroom. Though the volunteers had some past educational experiences, they were not familiar with...
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Revealed: the science behind teenage laziness - Telegraph

Revealed: the science behind teenage laziness - Telegraph | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Teenagers really get a bad time,’ says Sarah-Jayne Blakemore. ‘It is amazing how it seems to be totally acceptable – even institutionalised – to parody and demonise them. We laugh at things that mock teenagers, but if you applied those sorts of jokes to any other sector of society, it just wouldn’t be acceptable.’ Blakemore is a professor of cognitive neuroscience and deputy director of the University College London Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. She is sitting in her office behind Russell Square, the heartland of London academia, mounting a strong defence for every teenager in Britain who has slammed a bedroom door, smoked a cigarette, driven a car too fast and even – though she certainly doesn’t condone this – given in to the peer pressure that surrounds drugs such as Ecstasy.
Society’s response to the teenage conviction that ‘nobody understands’ is often lack of patience. Teenagers, we think, are moody, self-absorbed, reckless, defiant creatures who reject our wisdom in favour of a path of personal sabotage. But the rallying cry from Blakemore – an increasingly powerful voice in the world of international neuroscience, who has given policy advice to the British government – is that teenagers are right. Beyond the world of neuroscientific research, for the most part society does not understand them.

Via John Evans
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40 Apps for the Classroom | Teacher's Lounge Blog | Really Good Stuff®

40 Apps for the Classroom | Teacher's Lounge Blog | Really Good Stuff® | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Make the most of the iPads and iPods in your classroom with educational apps that enhance learning and make life in the classroom easier. The following 40
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Free Technology for Teachers: Save Kahoot Quiz Results In Your Google Drive Account

Free Technology for Teachers: Save Kahoot Quiz Results In Your Google Drive Account | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
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Top 10 eLearning Resources You May Not Have Thought Of - e-Learning Feeds

Top 10 eLearning Resources You May Not Have Thought Of - e-Learning Feeds | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Guest post by Robert Morris. The upswing of the eLearning industry is showing no signs of slowing down. An increased number of educators, organizations, institutions, …
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Formative Assessment Is Transformational!

Formative Assessment Is Transformational! | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
More than just numbers in a grade book, formative assessment practices can change how you teach, how your students learn, and how your classroom functions.
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Why Sleeping May Be More Important Than Studying

Why Sleeping May Be More Important Than Studying | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Getty Getting enough sleep is an under-valued but crucial part of learning. Contrary to students' belief that staying up all night to cram for an exam wi
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DIY Human Body for Science Activities - ClassTechTips.com

DIY Human Body for Science Activities - ClassTechTips.com | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Last year I shared a fantastic free app DIY Sun Science that gives students access to lots of content to explore.  The Lawrence Hall of Science has a new app for iPads called DIY Human Body that includes informational text, activities and videos.

Via John Evans
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SMARTERTEACHER's curator insight, February 18, 4:06 PM

Great app, lots of valuable information and student based activities.

Alfredo Calderon's curator insight, February 19, 5:43 AM

App IOS para el estudio del Cuerpo HUmano. ¡Libre de costo!

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5 Effective Ways for Developing Problem Solving Skills ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

5 Effective Ways for Developing Problem Solving Skills ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

Via Educatorstechnology
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, February 17, 1:47 PM

Problem-solving and Idea Generation infographic: Handy! 

Sharon Berman's curator insight, April 6, 6:42 PM

Although these activities seem to be targetting Middle school, they can easily be adapted to target Higher Education, Undergraduate courses.  Some can even easily translate to to online virtual classroom situations, such as the brainstorming with a twist and the word association activities.

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It's Time to Make Learning Fun Again . . . Even for Adults

It's Time to Make Learning Fun Again . . . Even for Adults | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Bring professional development events to life with Interactive Learning Challenges, which merge collaboration, interactivity, and problem solving in a hands-on environment for learning technology.
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5 Tips for Teaching the Tough Kids

5 Tips for Teaching the Tough Kids | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Guest blogger Josh Work shares five techniques for dealing with middle school students who present ongoing discipline issues. His underlying theme is recognizing these kids as adolescents seeking ways to cope with stress or complicated lives.
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Four Questions You Should Ask to Help You Think Like a Learner

Four Questions You Should Ask to Help You Think Like a Learner | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Here’s a quick list of questions your learners will be asking, ask them yourself when designing your eLearning course.

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, February 14, 10:38 PM

Many schools are asking teachers to consider using online learning management systems, providing students with access to course material online. Creating an online course requires teachers to learn new skills. This post from SH!FT suggests that you think like the learner when you design a course and provides four questions you should consider in this process. The four questions are below. Additional information is found in the post.

1. Why would they want to see and read through a screen?

2. Does the course look good?

3. Can they control the course and find their way around it?

4. Was the learning experience worthwhile?

Additional resources are also provided in the post.

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21st Century Icebreakers: 11 Ways To Get To Know Your Students with Technology

21st Century Icebreakers: 11 Ways To Get To Know Your Students with Technology | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
On Monday I will begin my new job. As I've mentioned before, I will be working as a Technology Resource Specialist as well as teaching a couple of classes.

 

In an effort to bring my own classroom to the present, I’ve put together a list of 10 icebreakers that use technology and fit with 21st century students:


Via Dennis T OConnor, Naomi Monson, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Naomi Monson's curator insight, June 7, 2013 10:08 AM

Ways to interact and reate community with your leaners.

Monica Goddard's comment, June 12, 2013 4:38 PM
Congratulations on your new position! Thanks for the great icebreakers ideas and all of the fantastic comments.
Naomi Monson's comment, June 13, 2013 3:17 PM
Thanks and good luck with your endeavors
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What Kids Should Know About Their Own Brains

What Kids Should Know About Their Own Brains | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Getty Neuroscience may seem like an advanced subject of study, perhaps best reserved for college or even graduate school. Two researchers from Temple
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Differentiation Is Just Too Difficult: Myth-Busting DI Part 3

Differentiation Is Just Too Difficult: Myth-Busting DI Part 3 | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Most teachers differentiate their instruction intuitively because not all students are the same. For those willing to commit to DI, the next step is intentional differentiation.
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