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The Most Famous Author From Every State

The Most Famous Author From Every State | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
From California's John Steinbeck to Maine's Stephen King, here are the most famous authors from every state.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, November 9, 2013 9:51 AM

I actually debated whether or not to scoop this article. I've long been a bit skeptical about "Best _________" lists of any kind. But, this article doesn't claim these are the best authors, nor does it ignore the possibility that there are other authors of equal or better note. 

 

I was impressed that the article's author actually listed her criteria, giving the reader an opportunity to recognize the "lean" of the evaluative assessment. For example, I suppose "ubiquity, literal acclaim, and financial success" are appropriate criteria for determining fame, though they might not be the most appropriate criteria for evaluating quality. 

 

That's fair.

 

That gives me permission to scoop this article for its interest level. 

 

And it sent me off on a little side trip. As professional literature educators, we have come to recognize that there are titles that are considered the canon of great literature. Most literature taught in schools rely upon an assumption that these are (at least among) the very best of the best and therefore ought to be the at the heart of literary reading's "must teach" books. 

 

Of course there is open debate and continued conversation about the wisdom of sticking (more or less) to the "dead white guys" curriculum. This conversation is perhaps as prevalent in English Department meetings as is the topic of "Kids these days! They just don't read as much as they used to!"

 

And I could not help but wonder...

What if we ignored the fact that this article "picks a winning author" from each state and what if we ignored the fact that this article assigns the "winning authors" by state? Why? Because we all know that each state has many popular and great writers and because we know that it might be spurious reasoning to suggest that we can judge a state's citizens' intellectual level by the author who represents their literary reading choices. For example, Dan Brown is certainly famous. But, we really don't know where his work stands in popularity among the citizens of New Hampshire. We certainly know that Mark Twain and John Steinbeck were often much more popular outside of their home states than inside their home states. 

 

But, what if we simply took this article as a sample data-set of what "average people who DO READ" read?  That's AVERAGE readers, not just the "professional readers" who teach literary reading?

 

Why? Because our "clients" are not all destined to major in English. But they are all destined to make personal decisions about whether or not they will be lifelong readers. 

 

So, what might we cull from this article? Perhaps, we can concentrate on what these authors write about regardless of their reputations among scholars.What do they bring to the conversations about the human condition that is attractive to large portions of the GENERAL population? They are "selling" reading to an impressive cross-section of the population whether it be local, national, or international. 

 

There are those who consider the likes of Stephen King and Dan Brown  "B-List" writers. But, whether or not one is presumptuous enough to offer "better writers than those guys," they are at their essence writing stories containing the very same themes about the nature of the human condition as those on the  assumed "A-List." And, they are reaching millions of people while raising the same esstential questions that we hope all well educated people choose to ponder.

 

What do the most popular writers write about?

 

What do they offer the GENERAL reading populace that many of the "A-list" authors" do not, or perhaps I should say, do not any longer offer to the AVERAGE reading populace? 

 

Perhaps, they are tapping into new forms of engaging contemporary readers as the "A-listers" were able to do in other times and continue to do "less broadly" as the distance between their times and their locations and their proximal relationships grows further from the zones of proximal development grows.

 

Perhaps the order of importance in selecting literature ought to be:

 

Above all else, sell them reading.. 

Then sell them the idea of wanting to read better stories.

Then sell them the idea of wanting to read the best.

 

The concept of The perfect being the enemy of the good, most often attributed to Voltaire, might be worth considering. Certainly the best of the best literature is better than the pretty good. But, let us not forget that the pretty good may be reaching far more people far more successfully than the best of the best does.


 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name of GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit

 

 

 

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Rescooped by Cindy Riley Klages from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
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Developing students' digital literacy

Developing students' digital literacy | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 20, 2:44 PM
Teachers play a signicant role in each student's learning, including digital literacy.
Viljenka Savli (http://www2.arnes.si/~sopvsavl/)'s curator insight, April 21, 2:43 AM
Useful article...
 
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Brains, Brains, Brains! How the Mind of a Middle Schooler Works

Brains, Brains, Brains! How the Mind of a Middle Schooler Works | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Blogger Heather Wolpert-Gawron launches this three-part series by advising middle school teachers to read up on brain research which will give insight on how the 'tween brain works.
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 22, 6:53 PM
Good research can be helpful for teachers to draw on and inform their teaching.
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More Than Dr. Seuss Hats - Why Events Matter

More Than Dr. Seuss Hats - Why Events Matter | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Choice Literacy's Franki Sibberson explains how scheduling big events can do important work in building the reading community
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Free Interactive Guides to Help You Make The Best of Mac and iPad in Teaching - curated via Educators' Technology

Free Interactive Guides to Help You Make The Best of Mac and iPad in Teaching - curated via Educators' Technology | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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OFFREDI Didier's curator insight, April 15, 6:41 AM
Free Interactive Guides to Help You Make The Best of Mac and iPad in Teaching - curat... | @scoopit via @TDOttawa http://sco.lt/...
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NGSS Group Publishes Guide for Districts

NGSS Group Publishes Guide for Districts | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
To successfully implement the Next Generation Science Standards, districts should establish a science leadership team, ensure that teachers and school leaders get high-quality professional learning, and collaborate with other districts, according to new guidelines from Achieve.
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"Loom" - Tool for Recording Educational Video Tutorials via Educators' Technology

"Loom" - Tool for Recording Educational Video Tutorials via Educators' Technology | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Rescooped by Cindy Riley Klages from Educational Technology News
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All Students Can Find Power in Thinking Like Computer Scientists

All Students Can Find Power in Thinking Like Computer Scientists | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

"In recent years there’s been a lot of emphasis on teaching kids computer science both in high school and at much younger ages. Computers are an integral part of schools and workplaces; many educators and parents believe learning to code is now a skill akin to learning to write."


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Set of Flipped Classroom Tools & Tips for Educators

Set of Flipped Classroom Tools & Tips for Educators | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
In this post I have mentioned the commonly used tools by educators to flip their classroom and some tips that they will find helpful.
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Behavior Expectations and How to Teach Them

Behavior Expectations and How to Teach Them | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Instead of assigning disciplinary consequences when students don't meet behavior expectations, why not deal them as we would deal with academic failures and missteps?
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Independent Reading for Drop Everything and Read Month

Independent Reading for Drop Everything and Read Month | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Literacy Daily—the blog of the International Literacy Association (ILA)—features education stories, teaching tips, book reviews, and more.
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3 Methods To Motivate the Unmotivated

3 Methods To Motivate the Unmotivated | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
We share evidence and practitioner-based learning strategies that empower you to improve K-12 education.
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Here Is How to Access and Edit Google Drive Files Offline via Educators' Technology 

Here Is How to Access and Edit Google Drive Files Offline via Educators' Technology  | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Words Matter: The Repercussions of What We Say - And Don't Say - About Students

Words Matter: The Repercussions of What We Say - And Don't Say - About Students | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
The way we communicate with and about students can have major equity implications. A new book explains how educators can match their speech to their values.
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Teaching a Class With Big Ability Differences

Teaching a Class With Big Ability Differences | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Techniques for meeting the needs of students with diverse abilities and interests.
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 22, 6:51 PM
Providing choice can be great for students. They begin to take responsiblity for their learning. What works for each of them. "Differences make a difference." Good teachers understand this and still teach
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Lesson Plan: K-2 Poetry Portfolios: Using Poetry to Teach Reading - ReadWriteThink

Lesson Plan: K-2 Poetry Portfolios: Using Poetry to Teach Reading - ReadWriteThink | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Teach your students about sentence structure, rhyming words, sight words, vocabulary, and print concepts using a weekly poem.
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Print Custom Sticky Notes with Google Slides

Print Custom Sticky Notes with Google Slides | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Google Slides is a handy design tool, and you can copy my template to print
your own design on sticky notes. I've got directions, a video, and loads of
examples for you.
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Digital Storytelling Wheel for Teachers

Digital Storytelling Wheel for Teachers | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
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The Literacy–Movie-Making Connection

The Literacy–Movie-Making Connection | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Literacy Daily—the blog of the International Literacy Association (ILA)—features education stories, teaching tips, book reviews, and more.
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Growing from Peer Feedback via The Teaching Channel

Growing from Peer Feedback via The Teaching Channel | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
How to use peer feedback to develop growth mindsets in young students. With positive and constructive feedback from peers, students can develop resiliency in trying things that are challenging to them.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Anna Mclean's curator insight, April 12, 8:18 PM
feedback strategies worth introducing to your classroom
 
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Some Very Good  Social Studies Apps for Teachers and Students

Some Very Good  Social Studies Apps for Teachers and Students | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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No Grade Is Too Early for Flexible Seating

No Grade Is Too Early for Flexible Seating | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
These students work while standing, kneeling—some of them even sit in chairs.
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Show, Don’t Tell: Revealing Revision Through Modeled Instruction

Show, Don’t Tell: Revealing Revision Through Modeled Instruction | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Literacy Daily—the blog of the International Literacy Association (ILA)—features education stories, teaching tips, book reviews, and more.
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Engage Kids With 7 Times the Effect

Engage Kids With 7 Times the Effect | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
The way to engage students is to make sure that they care about the material and know how much you care about them.
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6 Apps for Virtual Reality Field Trips Including Google Expeditions - AvatarGeneration

6 Apps for Virtual Reality Field Trips Including Google Expeditions - AvatarGeneration | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Virtual reality field trips, like Google Expeditions, have transformed how we see the world. Students can visit far flung places, explore how our body works, be transported into the past, and even travel through space using affordable virtual reality apps and headsets. Starting with no more than a piece of cardboard and a phone or tablet, any student can now experience amazing virtual field trips in the classroom or home. Virtual reality headsets like the Samsung Gear VR, Oculus RIFT and HTC Vive also offer a more detailed experience. Liven up your classroom or playtime, and get students excited about learning geography, history, and science with virtual reality.

Here are 6 of the newest and more popular apps for taking kids on virtual field trips.

Via John Evans
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Evaluation Within Project-Based Learning

Evaluation Within Project-Based Learning | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Because PBL is about more than learning content, PBL teachers should investigate and experiment with multi-model strategies for assessing their students' learning skills.

Via Sarantis Chelmis
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 1, 6:09 PM
I used rubrics and continuously edited them. I shared them with students so they could learn how to assess their progress and give me feedback about their learning and the rubrics. Rubrics are an opportunity for continuous conversations about teaching and learning.
Chris Carter's curator insight, April 2, 8:00 PM
Evaluating the steps and processes, as well as the final product, allows rigor and guidance for students. An important reality is that rigor need not be for high-stakes grades. Frequent, low- or no-stakes formative assessment can tap into the power of retrieval-based learning while PBL creates the opportunity for Design Thinking implementation. These two concepts can be realized in the evaluation of PBL.
Kathy Lynch's curator insight, April 2, 9:48 PM
Thx Chris Carter! This is the piece I have always struggled with, the overall project grade...how do you grade a creative product like a painting? This confirms my feelings that you grade the skills and processes that went into the creation.