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Rescooped by Cindy Riley Klages from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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7 Fantastic Apps and Websites for Reading at Home - via Monica Burns

7 Fantastic Apps and Websites for Reading at Home - via Monica Burns | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
There are lots of great apps and websites for reading at home during out of school hours. Here are seven of my favorite reading websites and reading apps.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Ten Reading-with-Tech Tips You Don’t Want to Miss via AskaTechTeacher 

Ten Reading-with-Tech Tips You Don’t Want to Miss via AskaTechTeacher  | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Here are ten of the top reading-related articles according to Ask a Tech Teacher readers: How do I create a classroom library checkout system? 5 Tech Tools to Inspire Reading 5 Tech Tools That Moti…

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Teaching Reading to a New Generation of Students - Who's Doing the Work? - Book Review

Teaching Reading to a New Generation of Students - Who's Doing the Work? - Book Review | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
The authors of "Who’s Doing the Work?" ask important questions about how literacy teachers should approach reading instruction for a new generation of students.
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"…And The Truth Behind “We’re All Reading Teachers”" from EricaLeeBeaton.com

... So when school leaders say “We’re all reading teachers,” they’re not say secondary teachers need to teach kids how to decode high-frequency words, nor are they asking teachers to simply add more traditional reading or writing assignments into their curriculum just for the sake of more literacy. Rather, mindful school administrators recognize that those “reading teachers” actually need support revealing the dynamic cognitive processes that make each subject unique and compelling. “Huh?” ...
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Use Word Clouds in eLearning or face to face in your writing classroom.

Use Word Clouds in eLearning or face to face in your writing classroom. | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Encourage learners to use word clouds to revise and edit their assignments.
Ask learners to read over the essays or assignments they just created and pick and choose keywords. Then, encourage them to create a word cloud with these words, so that they can determine if their work is on-topic and relevant, or if it needs to be revised and edited further

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, October 13, 2014 10:54 AM

10 suggestions that will appeal to any writing teacher. Written for online teachers, this article fits any class setting; online, blended, or traditional. 

Mike Dilger's curator insight, December 25, 2014 4:15 PM

Word Clouds are a great tool.  Here's one idea for incorporating into your classroom as a learning tool for students.

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Teaching Students Skills to become Better Online Readers

Teaching Students Skills to become Better Online Readers | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

Soon after Maryanne Wolf published “Proust and the Squid,” a history of the science and the development of the reading brain from antiquity to the twenty-first century, she began to receive letters from readers. Hundreds of them. While the backgrounds of the writers varied, a theme began to emerge: the more reading moved online, the less students seemed to understand."


Via Beth Dichter
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Betty Skeet's curator insight, August 1, 2014 12:08 PM

Reading on line...a good habit? Here to stay?

Dr. Helen Teague's curator insight, August 3, 2014 9:36 AM
Do students retain more information when they read from books rather than from digital devices? Does reading online present challenges due to distractions? Do students need to be taught skills to become better online readers?
Ruby Day's curator insight, August 3, 2014 5:21 PM

Studies show we are not reading as effectively online as we are with hard copies. This highlights the need for tools to help us read deeper online - e.g annotation type tools. This links to an interesting stuy of year 5 students using collaborative annotation software demonstrating higher performance than the control group's' paper based annotation.

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iPad Apps for Dyslexia/Reading Writing Support

iPad Apps for Dyslexia/Reading Writing Support | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Staff at CALL Scotland have produced a helpful Wheel of Apps guide for iPad that may be useful for students with dyslexia or who just need some additional support with reading and/or writing diffic...

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Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, April 1, 2014 12:40 PM

iPad Apps for students with Dyslexia.

Heidi Hutchison's curator insight, April 27, 2014 7:44 AM

Great resources!

Erin Schettler's curator insight, August 14, 2014 6:47 AM

This is an AMAZING compilation of apps to aid struggling readers!

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10 Good Apps to Enhance Language Learning, Reading and Writing | Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

10 Good Apps to Enhance Language Learning, Reading and Writing | Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

Today, I am sharing with you a set of some great iPad apps that are really good for language learning. The two basic skills emphasized here are reading and writing. I invite you to check them out and share with us if you have other titles to add to the list


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David W. Deeds's curator insight, January 12, 2014 9:47 AM

Yep, downloaded the Rosetta Stone TOTALe app this morning.

Annie Edmonds 's curator insight, February 3, 2014 3:30 PM

Is the next generation learing how to write or rt.

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Getting Your Students to Love Reading (Infographic)

Getting Your Students to Love Reading (Infographic) | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Reading is a huge part of a child's development. In the early stages, it should be a shared experience between parent and child which can impact a love of books

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, December 15, 2013 8:18 PM

Although this infographic was written with the parent in mind the ideas are applicable for teachers. Chances are you have at least a few students in your classroom whom may not be as engaged as you would like. Learn some of the tricks that you might try to help them become more engaged and consider sharing this with parents.

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Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis

Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

www.GoogleLitTrips.com


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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, November 17, 2013 11:37 AM

Happy to announce the publication of our newest Google Lit Trips for Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis. This Lit Trip was developed by Dalena Luis, a graduate student from the College of Education at the University of Central Florida.

 

Bud, Not Buddy is of particular interest as it is one of the English Language Arts Common Core Standards exemplar works for Literary Reading. And, it has won several awards for Literature.

 

Bud, Not Buddy is posted both in the K-5 and the 6-8 sections of the Google Lit Trips website.

 

We have also published a Google Lit Trip for Christopher Paul Curtis' The Watsons Go to Birmingham.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit.

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15 Of The Best Educational Apps For Improved Reading Comprehension

15 Of The Best Educational Apps For Improved Reading Comprehension | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

"Reading comprehension is a matter of decoding, reading speed, and critical thinking about the text, all of which can improve with tiered practice.

So below, in an order of general complexity, are 15 apps for improved reading comprehension, ranging from word and sentence fluency, to recall, to critical thinking skills, to reading speed."


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Karine Thonnard's curator insight, September 5, 2013 7:58 AM

add your insight...

 
Maria Persson's curator insight, September 5, 2013 6:13 PM

Always great to have more than one choice since there isn't one perfect app!

Jodi Griffin's curator insight, June 29, 3:58 PM

Ed. apps for reading comp

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Reading Assignments the #UDL Way: Creating Meaning and Interaction

Reading Assignments the #UDL Way: Creating Meaning and Interaction | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

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Kathleen McClaskey's curator insight, July 31, 2013 10:38 AM

Matt Bergman shares some excellent tools, strategies and steps in creating meaning and interaction in reading assignments. Discover how you can universally design your reading lessons this year. Here are a few highlights of those steps:

 

> Step 1: Have a central location to place all of your supports in one easy-to-find place. LiveBinders is a great way of helping keep everything organized and together!

> Step 2: Provide multiple ways of reading the assignment (aka Multiple Means of Representation). Give students the option of using paper, PDF's, and audio copies of text. Audacity and AudioBoo are great for producing audio!

> Step 3: Provide vocabulary supports! Use Quizlet to pre-teach vocabulary and provide a way for students to review terms when they are confused or need to study. Provide vocabulary supports for words students don't know like using Visuwords or Shahi.

> Step 4: Engage Students Differently to Find Meaning: use Read-Write-Think's Venn Diagram Maker

> Step 5: Show What You Know: use Padlet as a way for students to answer the essential question of the lesson.

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Balancing Readability and Reading Fluency | On Common Core | School Library Journal

Balancing Readability and Reading Fluency | On Common Core | School Library Journal | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

As states from Maine to Montana implemented the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), the readability recommendations shocked those teachers who find that their students already struggle to read classroom material.

 

But, when the crafters of the CCSS came out with “readability” recommendations (Lexile Measures), they did not arbitrarily say, “Kids can’t read. Let’s make it more difficult for them.” Knowing the research behind text complexity is critical to understanding the call for more complexity. The CCSS crafters examined college freshman textbooks and career manuals. These texts typically measure at a Lexile score of 1450. This Lexile measure was used as a benchmark for college and career readiness (CCR). Grade level Lexiles were then scaffolded in reverse, defining grade level Lexile expectations as stated in the Common Core Appendix A.


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Deb Gardner's curator insight, March 22, 2013 8:50 AM

Using a direct quote from Appendix A of the ELA CCSS, Ms. Jaeger reminds us that it's essential students also be offered opportunities to read for pleasure to further develop fluency and a love of reading.


Appendix A, (p. 9)

"Students need opportunities to stretch their reading abilities but also to experience the satisfaction and pleasure of easy, fluent reading within them, both of which the Standards allow for. As noted above, such factors as students’ motivation, knowledge, and experiences must also come into play in text selection."



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Some Schools Are Abolishing Homework In Favor Of Reading, And That's A Good Thing

Some Schools Are Abolishing Homework In Favor Of Reading, And That's A Good Thing | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
"The quality of homework assigned is so poor that simply getting kids to read replacing homework with self-selected reading was a more powerful alternative," said Professor Richard Allington. 

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GwynethJones's curator insight, August 6, 4:58 PM

Less Homework & More Reading? Yes, Please!

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ASCD Express 11.19 - Reaching Reluctant Readers

"We learn to do well what we learn to love," writes Pam Allyn in "Taming the Wild Text." For many students, reading is either a source of stress and anxiety or a chore and a bore. What can teachers do to help these students cultivate a love of reading? In this issue, educators redesign learning to draw on student interests, social media, research-based scaffolds, and family supports that make reading engaging and joyful.

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Newsela | Nonfiction Literacy and Current Events

Newsela | Nonfiction Literacy and Current Events | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Unlimited access to hundreds of leveled news articles and Common Core–aligned quizzes, with new articles every day.

Via Nik Peachey
Cindy Riley Klages's insight:

Great free resource for developing reading skills.

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Cecilia Di Felice's curator insight, April 4, 2016 9:55 AM

Great free resource for developing reading skills.

TL Cafe's curator insight, April 4, 2016 10:51 PM

Great free resource for developing reading skills.

Alexandra Koukoumialou's curator insight, April 5, 2016 3:29 AM

Great free resource for developing reading skills.

Rescooped by Cindy Riley Klages from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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5 Anchors For Using Technology To Teach Reading

5 Anchors For Using Technology To Teach Reading | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
5 Anchors For Using Technology To Teach Reading by Paul France, NBCT, InspirED Teaching reading is an art filled with limiting factors: motivation, vocabulary, decoding, and comprehension are only a few of the comprehensive skills or...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Татьяна Фокина's curator insight, March 6, 2015 12:29 AM

добавить ваше понимание ...

Jodi Griffin's curator insight, June 29, 3:57 PM

components in reading and using technology for instruction

 

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Beyond Words: How to Write for Readability

Beyond Words: How to Write for Readability | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

POSTED BY ANDREA AYRES

...If you are a purveyor of online content you have a duty to your reader. How text looks greatly impacts the willingness of your reader to interact with that text.



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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, August 13, 2014 1:15 AM

This article goes into considerable depth about many aspects of web writing and readability.  


Great lessons for anyone who creates web content. (Online instructors... learn these lessons!)

Ulrike Grabe's curator insight, August 22, 2014 7:56 AM

That! That's how online text should look.It's like balm on my frayed nerves and pleasant for the eyes. :-)

 

No wonder retaining information from an online text is so hard if presented in the wrong way.

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A Visual Guide To Slowing Down The Distracted Generation (Infographic)

A Visual Guide To Slowing Down The Distracted Generation (Infographic) | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
I’m guilty. And I’m definitely too old to be considered part of the ‘distracted generation’. I didn’t grow up with a device in hand at all times, hopping from shiny thing to shiny thing on the internet. I use tools to help keep me from being distracted online. Distractions are all around with technology, and connecting …

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Lynnette Van Dyke, Dennis T OConnor
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Learning Literary Terms With Taylor Swift

Learning Literary Terms With Taylor Swift | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
This article was written by teen reporters from The Mash, a weekly publication distributed to Chicagoland high schools.

By Kiley Roache, Nazareth High School

Whether you’re prepping for the AP Literature exam, or trying to crank out that ...

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, February 17, 2014 12:53 PM

17 February 2014

 

I can't say that I'm an expert on Taylor Swift lyrics. But, I have taken some teasing because I've found the lyrics to the few songs I've listened to, to be quite touching and poetic. 

 

In that limited experience, I was attracted to the storytelling aspect of her lyrics. They struck me as being as personal as quite thoughtful journal entries taken seriously by someone who cared and paid the price for doing so. Very touching.

 

And, now, thanks to Kiley Roache, of Nazareth High School, we have this article sharing several examples of the way Taylor Swift has used several literary devices in her lyrics.

 

If literary devices are intended to enhance the relationship between a writer's intent and the receptiveness of that writer's audience, then perhaps it might be significantly more effective to introduce  those literary devices via examples that really exist in the world of our students rather than only in the world of literary scholarship. That is, the power of literary devices may be more effectively "learned" when the focus is upon bringing the story to the reader rather than focusing upon bringing the reader to the device. 

 

Would I use this article in class. "Absolutely except..."

 

One lesson I learned long ago, is that too many students' have extremely rigid pre-established opinions about music types, genres, and performers to assume that sharing any musician's lyrics will be a welcome endeavor by all.

 

Seems obvious doesn't it? Different students have different tastes in music and more typically than not, for the most part they have yet to develop a breadth of musical appreciation that allows them to be receptive to music beyond the breadth of "their favorite" kinds of music. 

 

As an aside, it might be worth considering how far beyond their established interest in storytelling and beyond their Vygotskian Zone of Proximal Development we ask them to be receptive to when we assign all of them to study the same work of literature. 

 

Perhaps if we took every opportunity to wrap literary reading learning experiences around the question every students asks, "What does this have to do with anything I care about?" we might find more of them receptive to the lessons we design in our attempt to address the question every professional educator asks, "How can I use literature to encourage students to contemplate  not only what they care about but what they ought to consider caring more about?"

 

Bait the hook! 

 

Fans of Taylor Swift will "bite" a lesson on literary devices built around this article because it begins with  an established appetite. They'll feel a closer and deeper attachment via their "fandomness" to her work and probably rush out to other fans to clue them into the depths of Swift's lyrics that they've discovered.

 

If this is true for Taylor Swift fans then a parallel experience is probably true for students who happen be fans of other musicians.

 

Building upon this premise, I might ask students to email me a phrase from a lyric that they are particularly fond of.

 

I would print each one on a single sheet of 8.5x11 white paper using Helvetica font in the largest point size that I could so that the phrase would still fit on the single sheet of paper. 

 

I wouldn't identify the source. (student or musician).

 

Before class the next day, I would hang them around the room with as much space between them as possible on walls where there was ample space to walk.

 

I would immediately invite students to walk around and read the phrases with one intent. What do you suppose it was about each phrase that "someone" in this class thought was particularly meaningful? 


I would emphasize that it isn't important whether or not they find the phrase particularly meaningful. The focus being simply what did the writer of the lyric do with words that caused at least one of his or her fans to really connect with the phrase.

 

Then, I'd introduce this article assuring students who do not "care for Taylor Swift" that they don't have to watch the videos if they can't bring themselves to do so. They need only concentrate upon the term and the example.

 

The subsequent task being, "Did you see examples of 'any' of these terms in the phrases the class brought in?

 

It wouldn't surprise me if the students discovered that the use of literary devices is fairly common and that regardless of musical taste, many of these devices find themselves being used across many musical genres.

 

If there is merit in this thesis, then perhaps letting non-Swift fans  start with their favorite lines from their favorite musicians regardless of the teacher's opinions (informed or otherwise) about those musicians and then letting them discover what it was about those lines that they found particularly interesting would serve as an equally engaging and more successful approach than say, teaching cliché, oops, I mean simile by telling them  about someone being "as hungry as a bear;" or, explaining the allusion being made in one story they are not enjoying to another story they never heard of.

 

And, I would also suspect that once they've had some experience noticing the use of literary devices in stories they already have a personal engagement with, that they would have enough "lock on the concept" to begin noticing them in the works on the official course reading list.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

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25 Reading Strategies That Work In Every Content Area

25 Reading Strategies That Work In Every Content Area | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

"Reading is reading. By understanding that letters make sounds, we can blend those sounds together to make whole sounds that symbolize meaning we can all exchange with one another.

Without getting too Platonic about it all, reading doesn’t change simply because you’re reading a text from another content area. Only sometimes it does.

Science content can often by full of jargon, research citations, and odd text features.

Social Studies content can be an interesting mix of itemized information, and traditional paragraphs/imagery..."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, December 27, 2013 11:40 PM

Along with the visual that provides 12 reading strategies this post provides an additional 13 strategies and links to 4 additional resources. The strategies suggested go across curriculum areas.

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, December 28, 2013 3:07 PM

Great one

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25 Great Ways Schools Can Support Reading

25 Great Ways Schools Can Support Reading | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
In the age of the Common Core and its emphasis upon having students take on more challenging text, independent reading and student choice can easily take a back seat to the demands of increased rigor.

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, November 30, 2013 3:01 PM

How many ways can you come up with to support reading in school? This post provides 25 ways to support independent reading. Chances are you already know some of these but you will probably find one or two new ideas in the lengthy list. Below are five. Click view to read the complete list.

* Create a “Caught Reading” Campaign that features Teachers as Readers.

* Host Book Clubs for Students and Parents.

* Sponsor a Young Author Conference.

* Encourage Students & Teachers to Write Book Reviews.

* Host a Mystery Check-Out Day.

FutureITouch's curator insight, November 30, 2013 10:27 PM
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Audrey's curator insight, December 2, 2013 6:12 PM

In addition schools can encourage story writing.  Have a look at storgy featured on www.hotmoodle.com

 

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Common Core State Standards, Rules and Art

Common Core State Standards, Rules and Art | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

Policies, laws and now the Common Core State Standards are all sets of rules designed to guide and shape human behavior. These rules are implemented through institutions. How does an individual find one's way through all these rules, regulations, and institutions to become an informed, self-reliant, productive citizen? Since I write for children, I try to answer questions and reduce BIG ideas to something that is easy to conceptualize. So at the risk of being taken as simplistic, I will make an attempt here.


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Deb Gardner's curator insight, October 13, 2013 6:40 AM

My takeaway: "The standards are not in the books but in the way the books are used."

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15 Apps to Help Students with Dyslexia & Reading Difficulties - NCLD

15 Apps to Help Students with Dyslexia & Reading Difficulties - NCLD | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

Reading is the area in which students with dyslexia struggle the most. Luckily, there are mobile apps that can help with functions like text-to-speech and translation.


Via Kathleen McClaskey
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Luis Vargas's curator insight, August 6, 2013 4:28 PM

Lo que hubiera dado yo por una de estas apps cuando era niño; lástima que en ese entonces sólo daban coscorrones en estos casos

Beth Panitz, Ed.D.'s curator insight, August 7, 2013 4:28 PM

An easy-to-read table of apps. Includes links and descriptions.

Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, August 8, 2013 10:45 PM

Great appps to help!

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Awesome Stories: Primary Source Docs for Common Core

Awesome Stories: Primary Source Docs for Common Core | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

AwesomeStories is a gathering place of primary-source information. Its purpose - since the site was first launched in 1999 - is to help educators and individuals find original sources, located at national archives, libraries, universities, museums, historical societies and government-created web sites.

Sources held in archives, which document so much important first-hand information, are often not searchable by popular search engines. One needs to search within those institutional sites directly, using specific search phrases not readily discernible to non-scholars. The experience can be frustrating, resulting in researchers leaving key sites without finding needed information.

AwesomeStories is about primary sources. The stories exist as a way to place original materials in context and to hold those links together in an interesting, cohesive way (thereby encouraging people to look at them). It is a totally different kind of web site in that its purpose is to place primary sources at the forefront - not the opinions of a writer. Its objective is to take the site's users to places where those primary sources are located. 


Via Deb Gardner, Mel Riddile
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Deb Gardner's curator insight, March 27, 2013 6:23 PM

Excellent digital resource when teaching with CCSS, particularly in science and social studies!