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Quotes about Questioning from Well-Known People

Quotes about Questioning from Well-Known People | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Wonderful quotes about questioning, curiosity, and inquiry from well-known people. Send us any YOU know about, too.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 17, 6:47 PM

Teaching students how to ask good questions is important. Great quotes about questions may help them learn. This page provides quotes about questioning, quotes from a diverse group, including George Carlin, Frank Llyod Wright, Anne Frank, Oprah Winfrey, Albert Einstein and many more.

The images may be saved and you could print them out and use them as small posters in your classroom. Challenge your students to come up with a quote about questioning, curiousity and inquiry and consider making an infographic to share.

Jan MacWatters's curator insight, July 20, 1:58 PM

Great quote

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5 Assessment Strategies Every Teacher Should Know

5 Assessment Strategies Every Teacher Should Know | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

"Most teachers and current textbooks offer varied approaches to the material to be learned so the teaching can be brain-compatible with the varied student learning styles. It is only logical that respect for these individual learning styles be incorporated into assessment forms."


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Christopher Resetar's curator insight, February 13, 12:00 PM

Like other comments on this scoop, I really like this article, especially items #1 and #2.  I really like those options because they are unconventional options that I still think would provide an appropriate level of challenge for the students as well as provide an alternative form of just a simple pencil and paper exam.  I think option #1 is more feasible for elementary school because it would allow students to work on skills that are more age appropriate like consolidation of information and looking for quality source material.

Ruby Day's curator insight, February 14, 3:45 PM

Sounds like some great ideas to stimulate critical thinking

Audrey's curator insight, March 5, 6:51 PM

All 5 assessment methods involves  students leading the learning. Asking the students questions based on their reading of the topic helps their analytical  skills and allows them to be in charge of their learning. 

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The Inquiry Process - A Great Visual

The Inquiry Process - A Great Visual | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

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Peg Gillard's curator insight, October 27, 2013 9:51 PM

We are so far removed from inquiry based classrooms that curiosity is but a shadow. Students wait to be fed the learning, which isn't true learning if it is fed. True learning comes from asking our own questions and setting out on a quest to unravel the riddle we have created. 

Drora Arussy's curator insight, October 28, 2013 4:10 PM

wonderful visual for the inquiry process - for educators and to share with students.

OCM BOCES SLS's curator insight, November 7, 2013 1:24 PM

Great graphic for inquiry learning

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Why It's Time To Start Teaching Students How To Think - Edudemic

Why It's Time To Start Teaching Students How To Think - Edudemic | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
As an elementary teacher, I can’t help but notice that children today want quick answers and do not take the time to think things through.

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Carolyn Williams's curator insight, August 26, 2013 4:57 AM

Making it Fun!

Kymberley Pelky's curator insight, August 26, 2013 3:12 PM

In an age where children expect everything to be instant, their responses become the same without taking time to process the information first.

Becky Mowat's comment, August 26, 2013 9:48 PM
Analysis and synthesis take time...and are critical to problem solving, as we all know. How to teach these higher level thinking processes is key to helping students become successful independent learners.
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Student-Driven Learning: 50 challenging questions to ask your students

Student-Driven Learning: 50 challenging questions to ask your students | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

"Using the right questions creates powerful, sometimes multiple answers and discussions. Aristotle said that he asked questions in response to other people’s views, while Socrates focused on disciplined questioning to get to the truth of the matter."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, May 26, 6:34 PM

Learning to ask good questions is a topic that is often discussed today..but how do we teach students to ask questions, questions that will help them use their higher order thinking skills. This post provides questions you may use with your students to help challenge their thinking. It is split into categories, but many of the questions could be across curriculum areas. The categories listed are:

* Logical questions that focus on mathematics and are split into two categories: collaborative questions for the class and self-reliance questions for individual students.

* Reasoning questions

* Analysis questions

* Connections questions

* Literary questions

* Science and social studies questions.

Below are three of the fifty questions. Click through to the post to find which may work with your students.

* An analysis question - What patterns might lead you to an alternative answer?
* A science and social studies question - What are some of the complexities we should consider?

* A reasoning question  - Why do you think this works? Does it always, why?

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So? So What? What Now? How To Keep The Learning Going

So? So What? What Now? How To Keep The Learning Going | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

"...in practice, curriculum maps are almost always not the “living, breathing” documents experts like Heidi Jacobs Hayes promote. They are instead very dead things—lifeless prisons of content to be covered, and boxes to be highlighted...For a curriculum map—or any planned learning experiences—to be vital—and vitally useful—they must be adaptive and circular rather than rigid and linear. ...they must encourage students to continue their pursuit of understanding and self-knowledge."


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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, November 24, 2013 8:53 AM

Awesome!  Awesome!  Awesome!!  Heidi Hayes work is so creditable.  these ideas extended her thinking!

Sue J Wilson's curator insight, November 25, 2013 10:32 AM

"...in practice, curriculum maps are almost always not the “living, breathing” documents experts like Heidi Jacobs Hayes promote. They are instead very dead things—lifeless prisons of content to be covered, and boxes to be highlighted...For a curriculum map—or any planned learning experiences—to be vital—and vitally useful—they must be adaptive and circular rather than rigid and linear. ...they must encourage students to continue their pursuit of understanding and self-knowledge."

Roberta Orlando's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:01 AM

Interesting food for thought...worth reading ;)

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4 Phases of Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guide For Teachers

4 Phases of Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guide For Teachers | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

"According to Indiana University Bloomington, Inquiry-based learning is an “instructional model that centers learning on a solving a particular problem or answering a central question. There are several different inquiry-based learning models, but most have several general elements in common..."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:20 PM

This indepth post explores inquiry-based learning. The four phases are:

1. Interaction - Big Idea: Dive into engaging, relevant, and credible media forms to identify a “need” or opportunity for inquiry

2. Clarification - Big Idea: Summarizing, paraphrasing, and categorizing learning with teacher or expert support

3. Questioning - Big Idea: Asking questions to drive continued, self-directed inquiry

4. Design - Big Idea: Designing an accessible, relevant, and curiosity-driven action or product to culminate and justify inquiry

Each of the four phases also includes information on tones, student indicators, teacher indicators, appropriate questions and apps.

There are also 4 questions for student-based reflection and ten adjustments you may make as a teacher to adjust to teaching inquiry-based learning.

There are many forms of teaching that incorporate inquiry-based learning including project-based learning, blended learning, and challenge-based learning. You may find your students more engaged in the learning process if you include some components of inquiry-based learning in your classroom.

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The Socratic Process - 6 Steps of Questioning (Infographic)

The Socratic Process - 6 Steps of Questioning (Infographic) | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Hola: Una infografía sobre el proceso socrático. Un saludo

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Audrey's comment, August 9, 2013 7:31 AM
I agree Teri. It encourages reading and encourages students to be in charge of their learning.
Audrey's curator insight, August 9, 2013 7:39 AM

Using the Socratic process the educator is a tutor.  The process  encourages evaluative and analytical thinking.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 9, 2013 12:55 PM

This is an easy and yet thorough infographic.