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49 Maps That Explain The U.S.

49 Maps That Explain The U.S. | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

"49 Maps That Explain The U.S. For Dumb Foreigners--The United States is mind-boggling. Right?!"


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, April 3, 3:24 PM

Lots of infographic maps for students.

Julie Cidell's curator insight, April 4, 10:18 AM

#10 and #11 are a great comparison to each other.

Gary Harwell's curator insight, April 5, 8:32 AM

For students that are new to the US, these maps could prove very educational..

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Martin Luther King-Then and Today

I Have a Dream Speech Martin Luther King's Address at March on Washington August 28, 1963. Washington, D.C. When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring fro...

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Cindy Riley Klages's insight:

Teachers:  How great would it be to use the actual speech?  Can you say, "primary source?"  Here's an idea:  Print it out and let students close read this important speech, too.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 19, 2013 10:49 AM

There is much to glean from Martin Luther King's famous I Have a Dream speech as a fantastic rhetorical device. This speech has a profound impact on the the psyche of the America culture and it has endured as a pivotal moment in history.  As we celebrate his life and legacy this Monday, it is an appropriate time to contemplate that the ending of segregation (a spatial division of races) has reshaped the United States. 


Many streets in the United States bear the name "Martin Luther King Jr." to memorialize both the man and the Civil Rights movement.  This streets, as this YouTube video suggests, are often in poor, crime-ridden and violent neighborhoods.  This video highlights the irony between the historical memory of Martin Luther King Jr. and places of memorialization that bear his name.  This video echoes much of what the authors of the fantastic book "Civil Rights Memorials and the Geography of Memory" say (in fact one of the authors is shown in this video). 


Questions to ponder: If Martin Luther King Jr. represents non-violence, then why are streets bearing his name often in 'violent' neighborhoods?  Where should Martin Luther King be memorialized in the United States?  Only in the South?  Only in predominantly African-American communities?  What does the geography of the spaces where he is memorialized say something about the United States?    

 

Tags: historical, culture, landscape, place, race, unit 3 culture, USA, urban, poverty, unit 7 cities, book review

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 4:56 PM

Probably they think that martin Luther king is more important to African American, then the rest of the United States population, but I personally feel that martin Luther king, represent a changing America also he is a very important figure in American history, he should be place in a better location so people that come to visit united states could venerate him as a man who fought for not only for African American but also for every minorities living in the United States.

Norman Chan's curator insight, July 12, 2014 7:50 PM

After watching his speech, I feel that he really worked hard fighting for the African Americans. He must have been really brave to step up and fight for the African American. If there was someone like him at this date, I feel that racism would greatly decreased as many would be inspired one his/her words.

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A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     


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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 8:06 AM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 2:15 PM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.    

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Stanford History Education Group

Stanford History Education Group | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 29, 2013 11:38 AM

The Stanford History Education Group has amassed some great resources for social studies teachers.  Their chief resources is a program called Reading Like a Historian.  The program has 71 stand-alone lessons for U.S. History organized within 11 units. These lessons span colonial to Cold War America and cover a range of political, social, economic, and cultural topics. They are continuing to expand the Reading Like a Historian program to World History.  Currently there are 15 lessons from across the world history sequence with more lesson plans under development that will be released in the next few months.


Tags: historical, teacher training.

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, August 30, 2013 6:27 AM

Des plans de cours et des documents sur l'histoire des USA et du monde. 

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Mapping the Nation

Mapping the Nation | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it

This link is a companion site to the book, "Mapping the Nation: History & Cartography in 19th Century America" by Susan Schulten.  The author and publisher have made all of the images available digitally, and they are organized by chapter as well as chronologically.  This a great resource to find some of the important maps that shaped America and help mold the manner in which we conceptualize America.  Geography and history teachers alike will be able to draw on these materials.  The chapters include:

The Graphic Foundations of American History Capturing the Past Through Maps Disease, Expansion & Rise of Environmental Mapping Slavery and the Origin of Statistical Cartography The Cartographic Consolidating of America

 

Tags: book reviews, historical, mapping, USA


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