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Rescooped by Cindy Riley Klages from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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PBIS & Culture Playbook - School culture tips to produce results

PBIS & Culture Playbook - School culture tips to produce results | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
In a new How-To Guide, Kickboard and 4 school leaders share 8 simple strategies to Increase attendance, Reduce discipline referrals, Reduce suspensions, Improve academic achievement. PBIS. Classroom Management. School Improvement. School Culture.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Rescooped by Cindy Riley Klages from Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Can We Create a Culture That Values Good Teaching?

Can We Create a Culture That Values Good Teaching? | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
We like to talk about the value of pedagogy, but we never seem to get around to rewarding it.

Via Gust MEES, Ivon Prefontaine, PhD
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 27, 2014 11:55 AM

Good teaching is probably happening without us realizing it. I read an article that suggested good teaching is about raising the standards for learning. It is a mindful experience.

Bob Irving's curator insight, May 28, 2014 8:07 AM

Addresses mostly higher ed. A welcome approach from uninformed teacher bashing. Truly great teachers are the most influential people on the planet.

Michel J. Boustani's curator insight, May 28, 2014 8:15 AM

The title says all!

Rescooped by Cindy Riley Klages from Geography Education
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Comparing the five major world religions

"It's perfectly human to grapple with questions, like 'Where do we come from?' and 'How do I live a life of meaning?' These existential questions are central to the five major world religions -- and that's not all that connects these faiths. John Bellaimey explains the intertwined histories and cultures of Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam."


Via Seth Dixon
Cindy Riley Klages's insight:

8th grade World History Teachers in AL - What do you think?

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mary jane james's curator insight, April 7, 2:55 PM
This video relates to my subject on religion by showing the five main religions and how they're changing the world and prospective of how people see themselves on earth.
 My opinion on the video is that is good to see that all of the religions are somewhat related by where and how they were created, and also what is shown in them.
 
Hailey Austin's curator insight, May 11, 9:53 PM
This article relates to are class because it is talking about different religions. It states that we all have different beliefs, but we believe in a higher power. This article was interesting because it shows you how different your beliefs are to other religions. They all have a story they believe is true.
Mr Mac's curator insight, June 13, 10:27 AM
Unit 3 - Religion
Rescooped by Cindy Riley Klages from Geography Education
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Martin Luther King-Then and Today

I Have a Dream Speech Martin Luther King's Address at March on Washington August 28, 1963. Washington, D.C. When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring fro...

Via Seth Dixon
Cindy Riley Klages's insight:

Teachers:  How great would it be to use the actual speech?  Can you say, "primary source?"  Here's an idea:  Print it out and let students close read this important speech, too.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 19, 2013 10:49 AM

There is much to glean from Martin Luther King's famous I Have a Dream speech as a fantastic rhetorical device. This speech has a profound impact on the the psyche of the America culture and it has endured as a pivotal moment in history.  As we celebrate his life and legacy this Monday, it is an appropriate time to contemplate that the ending of segregation (a spatial division of races) has reshaped the United States. 


Many streets in the United States bear the name "Martin Luther King Jr." to memorialize both the man and the Civil Rights movement.  This streets, as this YouTube video suggests, are often in poor, crime-ridden and violent neighborhoods.  This video highlights the irony between the historical memory of Martin Luther King Jr. and places of memorialization that bear his name.  This video echoes much of what the authors of the fantastic book "Civil Rights Memorials and the Geography of Memory" say (in fact one of the authors is shown in this video). 


Questions to ponder: If Martin Luther King Jr. represents non-violence, then why are streets bearing his name often in 'violent' neighborhoods?  Where should Martin Luther King be memorialized in the United States?  Only in the South?  Only in predominantly African-American communities?  What does the geography of the spaces where he is memorialized say something about the United States?    

 

Tags: historical, culture, landscape, place, race, unit 3 culture, USA, urban, poverty, unit 7 cities, book review

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 4:56 PM

Probably they think that martin Luther king is more important to African American, then the rest of the United States population, but I personally feel that martin Luther king, represent a changing America also he is a very important figure in American history, he should be place in a better location so people that come to visit united states could venerate him as a man who fought for not only for African American but also for every minorities living in the United States.

Norman Chan's curator insight, July 12, 2014 7:50 PM

After watching his speech, I feel that he really worked hard fighting for the African Americans. He must have been really brave to step up and fight for the African American. If there was someone like him at this date, I feel that racism would greatly decreased as many would be inspired one his/her words.