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Quiz Yourself: How Good Are You at Teaching the Art of Learning?

Quiz Yourself: How Good Are You at Teaching the Art of Learning? | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Test how well you know some of these counterintuitive study tips.

Via Beth Dichter
Cindy Riley Klages's insight:

Interesting information about learning - good advice~

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 27, 9:35 PM

Do you know how your brain learns new information. On August 25, 2014 I posted How Does The Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies. This post is a follow-up to that post and has five questions. Below is one of the questions with the answers, but to see if you are correct you will need to click through to the post. 

Quoting from the post:

4) Your students each have an important class presentation to make in the coming days, and they need to memorize some material by heart. How much time should they spend studying and how much time practicing from memory?

A. A third of the time reading, two-thirds practicing from memory.
B. 90 percent studying the text — and 10 percent practicing from memory at the end.
C. 50 percent reading, 50 percent practicing.
D. Just read it a few times and sleep on it.

If learning how to learn is something you would like to learn more about, and if you would be willing to participate in a MOOC, Coursera will be offering the course Learning How To Learn again. It will begin on Oct. 3rd, so head over to Coursera to sign up. The course is free (unless you need documentation that you took it, in which case it will cost $49). I am in the final week of the course and would recommend it to you. At some point I will post my final assignment to share.

Gary Harwell's curator insight, August 29, 3:47 AM

Not only do we have to teach English but we have to teach the students how to Learn.

Rescooped by Cindy Riley Klages from Eclectic Technology
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Five Research-Driven Education Trends At Work in Classrooms

Five Research-Driven Education Trends At Work in Classrooms | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
Increasingly, educators are looking to research about how kids learn to influence teaching practices and tools.

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 15, 2013 8:38 PM

This post looks at five trends that have made their way into the classroom.  Learn more about:

* Brain-based learning

* Game-based learning

* Power of perseverance

* Questioning homework

* Cultivating creativity

In each of the five areas there are links to a number of resources. Gather together some of these great resources and share them with others in your school!

Pamela Perry King's curator insight, October 21, 2013 12:15 PM

Interesting ideas.

Rescooped by Cindy Riley Klages from Eclectic Technology
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5 Assessment Forms That Promote Content Retention

5 Assessment Forms That Promote Content Retention | Cool School Ideas | Scoop.it
If we hope to construct enduring understanding in our students, it's critical that, now more than ever, we know their strengths and interests. By incorporating students' strengths and weakness into a

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 22, 6:24 PM

As teachers today we are told that we must teach our students and help them construct "enduring understanding", providing them with the ability to transfer knowledge from one subject area to another subject area. We are also told that we should personalize education, requiring us to know the strengths and weaknesses and incorporate this into our lessons. And let's not forget that we must also assess our students. How can we make our assessments help students with content retention? This post focuses on this question, and provides five suggestions on ways to do this.

The first three suggestions are:

  • Tests Where Notes or Textbooks are Permitted
  • Take-Home Tests
  • Student-Made Tests

These types of tests may take more time to create but they have the ability to be written so that students have to do more than memorize information. There is more information on this in the post.

The next suggestion is:

  • Projects Pre-Approved by the Teacher

This requires that students demonstrate mastery of the subject. This will require the student to create (a 21st century goal) and additional information is in the post, including a discussion of what this might look like.

The final suggestion is:

    • Revisions and Retests to Build Skillsets

    This section discusses what we may do to help out student build their skillsets through feedback and opportunities to construct accurate information.

    As you read this post you may begin to consider alternative ways to assess your students that help them with content retention.

    Kathy Lynch's curator insight, March 23, 1:25 PM

    Ideas to expand thinking on current assessments, particularly for those who do not test well. Thx Beth Dichter!

    Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, March 24, 1:46 PM

    As teachers today we are told that we must teach our students and help them construct "enduring understanding", providing them with the ability to transfer knowledge from one subject area to another subject area. We are also told that we should personalize education, requiring us to know the strengths and weaknesses and incorporate this into our lessons. And let's not forget that we must also assess our students. How can we make our assessments help students with content retention? This post focuses on this question, and provides five suggestions on ways to do this.

    The first three suggestions are:

    Tests Where Notes or Textbooks are PermittedTake-Home TestsStudent-Made Tests

    These types of tests may take more time to create but they have the ability to be written so that students have to do more than memorize information. There is more information on this in the post.

    The next suggestion is:

    Projects Pre-Approved by the Teacher

    This requires that students demonstrate mastery of the subject. This will require the student to create (a 21st century goal) and additional information is in the post, including a discussion of what this might look like.

    The final suggestion is:

    Revisions and Retests to Build Skillsets

    This section discusses what we may do to help out student build their skillsets through feedback and opportunities to construct accurate information.

    As you read this post you may begin to consider alternative ways to assess your students that help them with content retention.