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Cool New Tech
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Photo-Taking Contact Lenses, Giant Crab Robots and Radiation-Blocking Underwear

Photo-Taking Contact Lenses, Giant Crab Robots and Radiation-Blocking Underwear | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it
A roundup of the 10 most interesting new technologies that make us scratch our heads and say, 'What the heck?
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Meet Glyph, a headset that beams video into your eyes

Meet Glyph, a headset that beams video into your eyes | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it
Forget about the big screen, the small screen and even the second screen. (The #Glyph headset lets you watch movies projected directly to your eyes, and look like a cyborg at the same time!
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Flexible Samsung Galaxy Note Book

Flexible Samsung Galaxy Note Book | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it
Samsung plans to introduce two new Galaxy devices with bendable displays in the foreseeable future, Samsung Galaxy Note Book
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Smartphones becoming the Brain of your Home

Smartphones becoming the Brain of your Home | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it
The smartphone became even smarter with hardware specs that can embarrass laptops and even some desktops: high-speed quad-core processors,
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Sharks outfitted with wearable computers give scientists a better understanding of their movement

Sharks outfitted with wearable computers give scientists a better understanding of their movement | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it
The gadgets have given scientists a true sharks-eye-view of the ocean and how they travel through it.
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Amazing Muscle Made of Fishing Line Is 100 Times Stronger Than Biological Muscle

Amazing Muscle Made of Fishing Line Is 100 Times Stronger Than Biological Muscle | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it

The high cost of powerful, large-stroke, high-stress artificial muscles has combined with performance limitations such as low cycle life, hysteresis, and low efficiency to restrict applications.


A team of material scientists at the University of Texas at Dallas have just discovered a new way to create powerful artificial muscles—synthetic sinew that forcefully expands and contracts on command—from low-cost, everyday fibers such as fishing line and high-tension sewing thread. In a study published today in the journal Science¸ the researchers described how they're doing it: by twisting the materials into springy and energy-dense coils. 

Extreme twisting produces coiled muscles that can contract by 49%, lift loads over 100 times heavier than can human muscle of the same length and weight, and generate 5.3 kilowatts of mechanical work per kilogram of muscle weight, similar to that produced by a jet engine. Woven textiles that change porosity in response to temperature and actuating window shutters that could help conserve energy were also demonstrated. Large-stroke tensile actuation was theoretically and experimentally shown to result from torsional actuation.


The researchers take polyethylene or nylon string, the plastics that can make up fishing line, and twist it under high tension over and over again. Once the plastic can't twist any more, it starts to coil up on itself like a curled telephone cord. This tightly bound coil is then temperature treated so that it's locked into place. 

When this coil is heated, the plastic tries to untwist. But this causes the entire thing to compress. "At first it seems confusing, but you can think of it kind of like a Chinese finger-trap," Baughman says. "Expanding the volume of the finger-trap, or heating the coil, actually makes the device shorten." And this is compounded by the fact that the molecules in polyethylene and nylon string also naturally contract lengthwise ever-so-slightly when they're heated. Together these effects make the plastic coil contract with incredible power—like a muscle. 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Reylinda T. Phillips
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Taylor Godbolt's comment, March 12, 12:54 PM
Amazing Muscle Made of Fishing Line Is 100 Times Stronger Than Biological Muscle<br><br>Author: William Herkewitz<br>Date: Feb. 20, 2014<br><br>Main Idea: Newest material that is stronger than the stuff we have stuck in our body, muscle.<br><br>Summary: This material is artificial muscle that is flexible, dynamic, and can be used many times.<br><br>Importance: It was an experiment in which you have to use many things and test.<br><br>www.populermechanics.com <br>
Austin R Stillwell's comment, March 15, 11:39 PM
{title}-Amazing Muscle Made of Fishing Line Is 100 Times Stronger Than Biological Muscle.{author}-William Herkewitz.{summary}-newest material used to make artificial muscle can lift more than 100 times more than your actual muscles.-material scientists at the University of Texas at Dallas have just discovered a new way to create powerful artificial muscles.-researchers take polyethylene or nylon string, the plastics that can make up fishing line, and twist it under high tension.{opinion}-no it was based on facts.{important}-yes, this can help improve yourself.{source}- http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=1A2LUbJjDQ0 http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/health/breakthroughs/synthetic-muscle-made-of-fishing-line-is-100-times-stronger-than-the-real-thing-16514805
Celest Ybarra's curator insight, March 30, 4:38 PM

Title: Amazing Muscle Made of Fishing Line is 100 Times Stronger Than Biological Muscle

Author: William Herkewitz

Main Idea: A new type of material that is made with a fishing line is used to make artificial muscles

Summary:

1) The material is flexible, dynamic, reusable, and is designed to be better and stronger compared to our biological muscle

2) The 'muscles' are made of inexpensive plastic strings and wires

3) Can be used in many things

Opinion: The text was factual

Question: How was it created? Will it help further advances for humans or technology?

Is this article important to science?: Yes, because it shows how much we are advancing in technology.

Source: http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/health/breakthroughs/synthetic-muscle-made-of-fishing-line-is-100-times-stronger-than-the-real-thing-16514805

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Graphene nanoribbons could be the savior of Moore’s Law

Graphene nanoribbons could be the savior of Moore’s Law | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it

With each new generation of microchips, transistors are being placed closer and closer together. This can only go on so long before there’s no more room to improve, or something revolutionary has to come along to change everything. One of the materials that might be the basis of that revolution is none other than graphene. Researchers at the University of California at Berkeley are hot on the trail of a form of so-called nanoribbon graphene that could increase the density of transistors on a computer chip by as much as 10,000 times.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Thierry Bodhuin's curator insight, February 18, 4:10 AM

Moore's law may continue ... 

 

Yaroslav Writtle's curator insight, February 18, 6:44 AM

Interesting stuff - wonder what could this mean for computing capacity 10 years down the line?

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The Internet of Things: Why Does it Matter?

The Internet of Things: Why Does it Matter? | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it
This is the final installment of a three-part series on the Internet of Things with Atmel’s Tom Vu and Internet of Things Council member Michael Koster. Today's topic: Why the Internet of Things matters.
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WIG Hovertrain: Innovation Takes Time

WIG Hovertrain: Innovation Takes Time | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it
In 2012, I wanted to share my idea for a form of rapid transportation that uses magnets for propulsion and the wing-in-ground-effect (WIG) for suspension above a track. Various “hovertrain” ideas using air suspension have been examined since before...
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Experimental contact lens aims to offer tactile sight for the blind

Experimental contact lens aims to offer tactile sight for the blind | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it
Experimental contact lens aims to offer tactile sight for the blind Gizmag "The more shapes you wish to recognize the longer the training should be, but it is similar to what happens when a blind person learns to recognize Braille writing, it is...
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Skryf sand writer by Gijs van Bon writes poetry on the ground (video)

Skryf sand writer by Gijs van Bon writes poetry on the ground (video) | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it
In this movie filmed at Dutch Design Week in Eindhoven, artist Gijs van Bon shows us his machine called Skryf, which writes words on the ground with sand.

Via Growthobjects
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How the Future of Gaming Looks on Google Glass

How the Future of Gaming Looks on Google Glass | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it
Google launched a series of mini-games for its high-tech Google Glass specs that allows players to use their heads as rackets to play a round of virtual tennis or slice shapes out of thin air like a karate master.
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‘Borophene’ Might Be Joining Graphene in the 2-D Material Club

‘Borophene’ Might Be Joining Graphene in the 2-D Material Club | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it
The world of two-dimensional (2-D) materials has just gotten a little more crowded.
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Artificial hand gives wearers a sense of touch

Artificial hand gives wearers a sense of touch | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it
Researchers have created a robotic hand that lets an amputee feel differences between a bottle, a baseball and a mandarin. (Amazing stuff. Now to make it a lttle scary - a bit of the human touch required.
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Researchers Make a Circuit So Flexible, It Can Wrap Around a Vein

Researchers Make a Circuit So Flexible, It Can Wrap Around a Vein | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it
If we really want to get the dream of implantable electronics off the ground, we'll need to figure out how to make circuit boards flexible enough to morph and move with our bodies. Thankfully, a team at The University of Texas at Dallas seems to have solved that, with thin film transistors that are flexible enough to wrap around a nerve or blood vessel.
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Space elevator could be built by 2035

Space elevator could be built by 2035 | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it

Imagine a ribbon roughly one hundred million times as long as it is wide. If it were a meter long, it would be 10 nanometers wide, or just a few times thicker than a DNA double helix. Scaled up to the length of a football field, it would still be less than a micrometer across — smaller than a red blood cell. Would you trust your life to that thread? What about a tether 100,000 kilometers long, one stretching from the surface of the Earth to well past geostationary orbit (GEO, 22,236 miles up), but which was still somehow narrower than your own wingspan?

The idea of climbing such a ribbon with just your body weight sounds precarious enough, but the ribbon predicted by a new report from the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) will be able to carry up to seven 20-ton payloads at once. It will serve as a tether stretching far beyond geostationary (aka geosynchronous) orbit and held taught by an anchor of roughly two million kilograms. Sending payloads up this backbone could fundamentally change the human relationship with space — every climber sent up the tether could match the space shuttle in capacity, allowing up to a “launch” every couple of days.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Szabolcs Kósa
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Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, March 9, 12:49 AM

Think I will pass on this

Linda Liem's curator insight, March 9, 8:06 AM

Science fiction may be coming true.

Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, March 10, 10:41 PM

Hundreds of challenges remain to be solved but as even NASA struggles to maintain an edge, the pay-off of a Space Elevator has never been clearer. The original idea of Konstantin Tsiolkovsky which Arthur C. Clarke turned into a novel could be the revolution space exploration needs.

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The world's largest aircraft can fly for three weeks

The world's largest aircraft can fly for three weeks | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it
The HAV 304 Airlander is green, efficient, a hybrid, and, well, quite bizarre. [Read more]
    
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The Next Generation in Neural Prosthetics

The Next Generation in Neural Prosthetics | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it

Following up on the success of cochlear and retinal prostheses for people who have lost sensory function, neuroscientists see a limitless horizon for related devices that are able to read electrical and chemical signals from the nervous system to stimulate capability and restore quality of life in persons suffering injury and disease.

In the future, according to researchers, the devices – known as neural prosthetics – will help epileptics, persons with treatment-resistant depression and chronic pain, victims of Alzheimer’s disease, wounded war veterans suffering post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury, persons with speech disabilities, and individuals who have sustained spinal cord injury and loss of limbs, among other applications in the research pipeline.

But before neural prosthetics can advance, engineers will be called on to make innovative use of materials to design and fabricate devices that allow sustained electronic functioning in the harsh environment of the human body, without causing tissue infection and other serious adverse conditions. Research efforts have focused on enhancing the performance of various types of materials used in neural prosthetics, in addition to developing interface technologies that enable the micro devices to be safely implanted in human tissue for long periods.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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aanve's curator insight, March 1, 10:05 PM

www.aanve.com

 

Richard Platt's curator insight, March 2, 11:46 AM

Very interesting wearable - on the inside of the body, - their big issue is having to solve the contradiction of stiff and flexible, turns out it is what is known as Physical Contradiction based on time.  Numerous inventive principles for solving that problem. 

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Brain interface lets one monkey control the movements of another

Brain interface lets one monkey control the movements of another | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it
Neuroscientists have taken us one step closer to an Avatar-like world after demonstrating a brain-to-spinal-cord interface that allowed a "master" monkey to remotely control the hand movement of an "avatar" monkey who was completely unconscious.
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NASA is working on Star Trek healing devices—'it's not sci-fi anymore'

NASA and Houston-based company GRoK Technologies will work on the development of new "breakthrough products," noninvasive medical technologies designed to "regenerate bone and muscle tissues." It really sounds like something out of Star Trek, but...
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Giant Solar-Powered UAVs Are Atmospheric Satellites

Giant Solar-Powered UAVs Are Atmospheric Satellites | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it
Why go to orbit when you can spend five years in the upper atmosphere with a solar-powered UAV instead?
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Beyond Moore's Law: Nanocomputing using nanowire tiles

Beyond Moore's Law: Nanocomputing using nanowire tiles | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it

An interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers from The MITRE Corporation and Harvard University have taken key steps toward ultra-small electronic computer systems that push beyond the imminent end of Moore's Law, which states that the device density and overall processing power for computers will double every two to three years.

The ultra-small, ultra-low-power control processor—termed a nanoelectronic finite-state machine or "nanoFSM"—is smaller than a human nerve cell. It is composed of hundreds of nanowire transistors, each of which is a switch about ten-thousand times thinner than a human hair. The nanowire transistors use very little power because they are "nonvolatile." That is, the switches remember whether they are on or off, even when no power is supplied to them.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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James Jandebeur's curator insight, February 1, 12:57 PM

It mentions that the processors can now be made smaller than a neuron, I wonder how its power compares. Still, quite a breakthrough if it works out.

aanve's curator insight, February 1, 11:09 PM
www.aanve.com
Christian Verstraete's curator insight, February 3, 1:29 AM

Will this address our needs when we reach the physical limits of our current chip technology?

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Glass that bends but doesn't break

Glass that bends but doesn't break | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it

Normally when you drop a drinking glass on the floor it shatters. But, in future, thanks to a technique developed in McGill’s Department of Mechanical Engineering, when the same thing happens the glass is likely to simply bend and become slightly deformed. That’s because Prof. François Barthelat and his team have successfully taken inspiration from the mechanics of natural structures like seashells in order to significantly increase the toughness of glass. 

Normally when you drop a drinking glass on the floor it shatters. But, in future, thanks to a technique developed in McGill’s Department of Mechanical Engineering, when the same thing happens the glass is likely to simply bend and become slightly deformed. That’s because Prof. François Barthelat and his team have successfully taken inspiration from the mechanics of natural structures like seashells in order to significantly increase the toughness of glass. 

“Mollusk shells are made up of about 95 per cent chalk, which is very brittle in its pure form,” says Barthelat. “But nacre, or mother-of-pearl, which coats the inner shells, is made up of microscopic tablets that are a bit like miniature Lego building blocks, is known to be extremely strong and tough, which is why people have been studying its structure for the past twenty years.”

Previous attempts to recreate the structures of nacre have proved to be challenging, according to Barthelat. “Imagine trying to build a Lego wall with microscopic building blocks. It’s not the easiest thing in the world.” Instead, what he and his team chose to do was to study the internal ‘weak’ boundaries or edges to be found in natural materials like nacre and then use lasers to engrave networks of 3D micro-cracks in glass slides in order to create similar weak boundaries. The results were dramatic.


Via Proto3000
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AMD unveils its first ARM CPU, the 64-bit 8-core Opteron A1100

AMD unveils its first ARM CPU, the 64-bit 8-core Opteron A1100 | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it
AMD has finally taken the wraps off its upcoming 8-core ARM SoC, codenamed Seattle. Seattle (officially designated Opteron A1100) is a server-class clip, with four or eight 64-bit ARM Cortex-A57 cores.
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Scribd Launches App for Kindle Fire, Nipping at Amazon

Scribd Launches App for Kindle Fire, Nipping at Amazon | Cool New Tech | Scoop.it
E-book subscription service Scribd is looking to take on Amazon from within.
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