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The Evolution of Society

The Evolution of Society | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
It is reasonable to hypothesize that at some point in the evolution of cells that there were non-symbiotic, parasitic cells that merged into other cells and destroyed both sets of life.  While non-...
Eli Levine's insight:

It's evolution.

 

And it's needed, before this society crumbles under the influence of the parasitic elites who currently govern it.

 

Will anyone learn that there is a better solution to the boom/bust cycle of societies?

Or is this the way that it is going to be done in general, from now, until the end of time and beyond?

Think about it.

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First comprehensive atlas of human gene activity released

First comprehensive atlas of human gene activity released | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it

A large international consortium of researchers has produced the first comprehensive, detailed map of the way genes work across the major cells and tissues of the human body. The findings describe the complex networks that govern gene activity, and the new information could play a crucial role in identifying the genes involved with disease.


“Now, for the first time, we are able to pinpoint the regions of the genome that can be active in a disease and in normal activity, whether it’s in a brain cell, the skin, in blood stem cells or in hair follicles,” said Winston Hide, associate professor of bioinformatics and computational biology at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and one of the core authors of the main paper in Nature.


“This is a major advance that will greatly increase our ability to understand the causes of disease across the body.”


The research is outlined in a series of papers published March 27, 2014, two in the journal Nature and 16 in other scholarly journals. The work is the result of years of concerted effort among 250 experts from more than 20 countries as part of FANTOM 5 (Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome). The FANTOM project, led by the Japanese institution RIKEN, is aimed at building a complete library of human genes.


Researchers studied human and mouse cells using a new technology called Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE), developed at RIKEN, to discover how 95% of all human genes are switched on and off. These “switches” — called “promoters” and “enhancers” — are the regions of DNA that manage gene activity. The researchers mapped the activity of 180,000 promoters and 44,000 enhancers across a wide range of human cell types and tissues and, in most cases, found they were linked with specific cell types.


“We now have the ability to narrow down the genes involved in particular diseases based on the tissue cell or organ in which they work,” said Hide. “This new atlas points us to the exact locations to look for the key genetic variants that might map to a disease.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Eli Levine's insight:
There it is. As it is in our genes, so too is it in our individual psyches and societies. Check it out!
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Climate change shifts the earth in Alaska

Climate change shifts the earth in Alaska | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Melting permafrost is destroying buildings in far north Alaska, worrying residents and scientists.
Eli Levine's insight:

It's adapt or die, people.

 

You STILL think that the profits of the oil companies and the economic sectors that they employ is worth risking our death?

 

Think about it.

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These Charts Reveal How To Negotiate With People Around The World

These Charts Reveal How To Negotiate With People Around The World | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Key insights for international business. 

British linguist Richard D. Lewis charted communication patterns as well as leadership styles and cultural identities in his book, "When Cultures Collide," now in a 2005 third edition. His organization offers classes in cross-cultural communication for big clients ranging from Unilever to BMW.

In support of cross-cultural studies, he writes: "By focusing on the cultural roots of national behavior, both in society and business, we can foresee and calculate with a surprising degree of accuracy how others will react to our plans for them, and we can make certain assumptions as to how they will approach us. A working knowledge of the basic traits of other cultures (as well as our own) will minimize unpleasant surprises (culture shock), give us insights in advance, and enable us to interact successfully with nationalities with whom we previously had difficulty.


Via Bonnie Hohhof
Eli Levine's insight:

This is FASCINATING!!

Love this stuff!

 

Think about it!

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As coal fades in West Virginia, drugs fill void | Al Jazeera America

As coal fades in West Virginia, drugs fill void | Al Jazeera America | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
McDowell County, once the top producer of coal in the nation, now leads state in overdose deaths
Eli Levine's insight:

And these are the same people who vote for conservative, anti-government and anti-care politicians.



You'd think they'd follow their own line to "pick themselves up by their bootstraps."  Apparently, no one looked at economic reality to notice that you can't pick yourself up by your bootstraps if you don't have boots.  You need someone to provide you with the boots first.  Then you can pick yourself up by the straps.



Honestly, I wouldn't be so angry about this if it was entirely a group of conservative adults running their own lives into the ground for the sake of drugs and ideology..  It's the fact that children are paying the price for this that gets me angry.



They didn't have a choice to be in these situations, to vote the ways that they did and to follow the beliefs that they believe.



And now, they pay for their parents' ignorance, stupidity and the consequences that follow from supporting lazy-faire economics and governmental non-intervention in the society and the economy.



Think about it.

 

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American Dream breeds worker 'shame'

American Dream breeds worker 'shame' | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Experts tell the BBC Americans feel greater shame for not succeeding in the modern, unstable labour market, even as the odds continue to mount against them.
Eli Levine's insight:

We are a silly people in America.

 

Not able or willing to see the forest through the trees; to realize the context of where we are and how we got to be where we are.

 

If this is the attitude we take when we allow businesses to prosper at everyone elses' expense, then we deserve the treatment that we receive.

 

It's just an abusive relationship, between the elites and the rest of us.

 

Textbook!

 

Think about it.

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The Future of Learning is Stuck in the Past

The Future of Learning is Stuck in the Past | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it

With the rise of social and mobile, technology is now part of our everyday lifestyle. The result however, is that consumer familiarity with technology and how quickly they adopt and incorporate it into all they do has outpaced that of companies and institutions.

 

The impact is profound.

 

People are learning, communicating and collaborating differently in their personal life. Yet elsewhere, they’re expected to follow dated protocol that is at best counter-intuitive. This is causing a revolt which is only going to become increasingly dire as time and technology progress.

Students, employees, are fueling an escalation of expectations and demands to do things differently.

 

At the same time, decision-makers are struggling to figure out why investments don’t pan out according to plan. They still see how people use technology as novelty and even frustrating because it’s always compared to the way the world was and not the world as it’s changing. 

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Amy Melendez
Eli Levine's insight:

Sorry, conservatives.

 

You can't stay still in this world.

 

Not for long, if at all.

 

And that is the only thing that will remain unchanged about this universe.  Whether you're mentally and emotionally able to cope is a different story.

 

Think about it.

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The Use of Haiku to Convey Complex Concepts in Neuroscience

Eli Levine's insight:

Interesting tool.

How very appropriate.

Excellent, well done.

 

Enjoy! :)

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Equality of Opportunity

Equality of Opportunity | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
The equality of opportunity will always fade away with the inevitable inequality of outcomes, all things being equal.  Wealth generates wealth.  Those who have will always be able to have more than...
Eli Levine's insight:

You can't have equality of opportunity without some semblance of equality of outcomes.  A mechanism has to be in place in order to accurately distribute wealth according to the value of the work that is done by the working population.

 

That's just the way the economy really works.

Friedman, Hayeck and von Mises were wrong.

 

Period.

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Exclusive: Recording shows that Army punished soldiers who asked for help | Al Jazeera America

Exclusive: Recording shows that Army punished soldiers who asked for help | Al Jazeera America | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Civilian advocates who work with wounded soldiers when they are being discharged are targeted by the Army
Eli Levine's insight:

Again, this possibly points to a potentially dangerous disconnect between the officer corps and the rest of the military population.  You think these soldiers are going to come to the call when and if it's American civilians who are acting unruly?  What's stopping them from turning against the officers and the civilian leadership who had neglected and treated them so poorly?

 

Potentially powerful allies to those who wish to undermine the civilian US government.  Deadly enemies of the state being brewed.

 

And it's all thanks to this logic that somehow pervades in our political and military circles that there is such a thing as absolute power when dealing with human beings.

 

Think about it.

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French business 'returns to growth'

French business 'returns to growth' | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
France's private sector output grew at its fastest pace in more than two and a half years in March, bucking forecasts for a further contraction, a survey says.
Eli Levine's insight:

Let's hope this continues, for Europe's sake.

Would love to get a look at the French government's bureaucracy to see what it is that they're doing that's helping/potentially hindering this growth.

 

Is this long term growth, or is this a short term blip?

 

Does anyone know or care to know what's going on in the French and, indeed, larger European and global economy?

 

Very interesting.

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RSA - Transforming behaviour change

 

 

Transforming behaviour change

The Government is taking behavioural science very seriously, but existing nudge-based approaches to behaviour change tend to represent what Aditya Chakraborty called "Cute technocratic solutions to mostly minor problems". The major adaptive challenges of our time, including debt, climate change, public health and mental health, require a deeper and more ambitious approach.
 
Transforming Behaviour Change argues for  a more sophisticated understanding of the relationship between our social challenges, our behaviours and our brains, based on a considered response to two major cultural developments. The first is the growing ascendancy of neuroscientific interpretations of human behaviour, leading to fears of reductionism and pharmaceutical control. The second is behaviour change becoming an explicit goal of government policy, leading to fears of Government manipulation and coercion. 

The report critically engages with these two developments, and proposes an alternative approach to behaviour change that builds on existing public and professional interest in brains and behaviour. We set out to shift attention away from the threatening idea of ‘science as authority’, justifying moral judgements, medical interventions and policy positions, and focus instead on the more productive notion of ‘science as provocation’, helping people foster the kinds of self-awareness and behaviour change they are seeking to develop. 

 


Via Alessandro Cerboni
Eli Levine's insight:

We are social beings.

 

We need each other and our environment to survive.

 

And we need to be cognizant of these facts about ourselves and our world if we're going to survive in it.

 

Profit needs to come second to well being and health.

 

And I don't know how to bring about those changes, other than to define and treat greed as a mental illness akin to suicidal thoughts.

 

As usual, it's probably more complicated than that.

 

But that's my Gordian knot solution to the problems that we're facing.

 

Think about it.

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The city as network - Social Physics | #dataviz #UrbanFlows

The city as network - Social Physics | #dataviz #UrbanFlows | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Traditionally, cities have been viewed as the sum of their locations – the buildings, monuments, squares and parks that spring to mind when we think of ‘New York’, ‘London’ or ‘Paris’. In The new science of cities (Amazon US| Amazon UK), Michael Batty argues that a more productive approach is to think of cities in terms of …

Via luiy
Eli Levine's insight:

And there you have it.

 

The blue prints for understanding empirically a city, a society, a nation.

Think about it.

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luiy's curator insight, March 23, 2014 8:16 AM

Cities and network analysis.

 

Viewing cities as networks allows us to use the toolbox of network analysis on them, employing concepts such as ‘cores’ and ‘peripheries’, ‘centrality’, and ‘modules’. Batty says that an understanding of how different types of network intersect will be the key that really unlocks our understanding of cities.

 

Cities, like many other types of network, also seem to be modular, hierarchical, and scale-free – in other words, they show similar patterns at different scales. It’s often said that London is a series of villages, with their own centres and peripheries. but the pattern also repeats when you zoom out and look at the relationships between cities. One can see this in the way that London’s influence really extends across Europe, and in the way that linked series of cities, or ‘megalopolises‘, are growing in places such as the eastern seaboard of the US, Japan’s ‘Taiheiyō Belt‘, or the Pearl River Delta in China.

sandra alvaro's curator insight, March 24, 2014 8:48 AM

Flows are not just the connectors between these important locations. Rather, the locations become important because – at least in part – they’re at the intersections.

Pierre Levy's curator insight, March 24, 2014 9:24 AM

By the way, geographs knew this a long time ago.

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Snoopy drone sniffs public's data

Snoopy drone sniffs public's data | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Security firm SensePost reveals its Snoopy drone, which can steal data from unsuspecting smartphone users, at the Black Hat security conference in Singapore.
Eli Levine's insight:

Why humans, why?

 

Honestly, you can ban the construction of these drones.  Odds are, however, that our government members would like to use these themselves for various nefarious purposes.

 

A shame, really.


Think about it.

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How the right sold austerity as the only economic solution

How the right sold austerity as the only economic solution | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Richard Seymour: More than 30 years of neoliberalism and six years of austerity have floored us, yet the left is incapable of mounting a serious challenge to this economic orthodoxy. Why?

Via Willy De Backer
Eli Levine's insight:

There is, perhaps, no other field more political than economics.  Economics is politics, politics is economics.  They go hand in hand, one effecting the other, such that those with wealth have political power and those who don't are stripped of it.

 

It's  a shame that we don't move away from this hoarding behavior on the part of the rich and those who already have wealth and power. to do what actually works for everyone (including the rich, on the grand scale of things).  The environment is going to collapse under our current economic activity and, with it, will go the society, the polity and the economic wealth that went with it.  This will happen, regardless of if the society is able to overcome its malaise, to assert its democratic majority over the rich in the government.

 

Sadly, the official Left is led by a seemingly incompetent group of "yes people" who may secretly support the self-destructive endeavors of the Right.  They will neither let people who are competent at communicating to others rise in their ranks, nor will they necessarily adopt the policies that are NEEDED to preserve our world on the tangible level, not on the imagined level that the conservatives like to keep us at.

 

And so, we're left to die, individually and collectively, because no one with official power would rise to the challenge to get all of these conservatives from either party, public or private, into mental health clinics.  The opinions of conservatives from any party remain, as far as society is concerned, on an equal basis with the actual facts of the world (when they are so clearly not).  This is how civilizations end, because those who learn how to play the socially constructed game win out over those who know what the actual game is always about.  It's not the image of society that matters, but the actual conditions within it and within the environment that do.

 

That's what I've been saying these past 4 years.

 

And I doubt anyone has, or will, listen to what I have to say before it's too late to do anything about it.

 

Think about it.

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Willy De Backer's curator insight, March 28, 2014 12:04 PM

"The political possibilities have been narrowed through serial defeats of the left, the consequent incorporation of social democratic parties into the neoliberal consensus, and the transformation of state apparatus in a less democratic direction. No governing social democratic party offers a serious alternative to the austerity remedy. The diminution of practical solidarity following on from the state-led defeats inflicted on organised labour is far-reaching. Nine out of 10 private sector workplaces have never seen a union rep, let alone a picket line; the number of days lost to strike action in recent years have been, barring a relatively small spike in 2011, at historic lows. The idea of "rank and file" organisation, let alone wildcat strike action, is something seen only on the peripheries of the labour movement. Trade unions have been effectively disciplined. This is an important reason why the labour response to austerity has been so feeble."

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“It’s not the economy, stupid, it’s the narrative!” | Paul Ormerod

“It’s not the economy, stupid, it’s the narrative!” | Paul Ormerod | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it

(...) A narrative in which people believe is the key to electoral success, much more so than the objective economic facts. During the long period of Conservative rule from 1951-64, for example, people genuinely ‘never had it so good’, in Harold Macmillan’s famous phrase. But the Labour leader, Harold Wilson, was able to convince the nation that the Tories were decrepit, and what Britain needed was the ‘white heat of the technological revolution’.


Via NESS
Eli Levine's insight:

The funny part about this, is that the Democrats have the technical "right" ideas about how the government can positively effect the economy, even if they don't have a lot of the specifics down yet, and are too busy lounging in the malevolent embrace of the rich and the well to do.

 

Laissez-faire only creates conditions where wealth gets sucked into the maw of the already wealthy.  This inhibits growth, well being and people's abilities to pursue happiness.  It enables the disintegration of the social fabric and the environment that we all depend on for our well being and our survival.  This is what happened in the 1920's, the 1880's, and now in the 1980's through the 2010's.  The Gilded Age leads primarily an era of its own destruction.  You'd think people would learn.

 

But they don't.

 

Think about it.

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The Heretical Economist: THE “DEPOLITIZATION” OF THE ECONOMICS

The Heretical Economist: THE “DEPOLITIZATION” OF THE ECONOMICS | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it

In its beginning as social discipline, the economic theory did not begin calling itself simply “Economy”, but “Political Economy”. This is something that comes from the mercantilist tradition in the year 1615, when Antonio de Montchretien coined this term with the publication of hisTreatise on Political Economy, wanting to imply thereby that the economics and politics are intrinsically linked. In that sense, this article aims to explain and make a critical analysis of the historical and epistemological process through which it has been tried “depoliticize” the economics which still happens today. 


Via Alessandro Cerboni
Eli Levine's insight:

All economics is political, just as all politics is economical.

 

This "subjectivity" of the no-classicicists and the marginalists clearly threw itself off base with the realities of the economy and the function of markets in general.  Yet this is what "modern" economics is based off of, largely as a political means for those who already have wealth and control of real capital (money, goods and services) to have a system with which they can justify their taking without producing value to the rest of the economy and, more importantly, to the society and the environment from which the economy grows.

 

The politics then becomes focused on the fostering of this weed of an economy that leeches everything out into the inner core of the plant, such that the plant dies and no one gets wealth, rather than pruning, shaping and tending to it in such a way that the economy becomes a bountiful tree for us all to sustainably enjoy.  It's just a question as to what the focus of the government is, through its ability to legitimately make and enforce laws in our society, that we get either the self-destructive social-economic situation or the sustaining and resilient one that can enable us to thrive at some points in our history (depending upon environment, economic and inter/intra social and political conditions).

 

It's a great big beautiful web, not a series of linear equilibrium equations that don't match to what's going on under everyone's noses.

 

Rescind Milton Friedman's Nobel Prize!

 

Think about it.

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BP refinery leaks oil into US lake

BP refinery leaks oil into US lake | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
BP's biggest refinery in the US spills crude oil into Lake Michigan after a malfunction but regulators say the leak has been contained.
Eli Levine's insight:

They haven't learned.

 

How is it that we're letting them continue to do business in our territories?

Living proof that the free market does not actually yield the most optimal conditions for the rest of society and the environment.  You need the society, acting through the government, to defend its interests from those who would simply exploit and destroy themselves for the sake of mere monetary profit.

 

It's just money, after all.

 

And oil is something that we need to get off of anyway.

 

For the sake of all of our survival, let alone, for the sake of our well being.

 

Think about it.

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▶ On the Nature of Causality in Complex Systems, George F.R. Ellis - YouTube

Big Bang cosmology, chemical and biological evolutionary theory, and associated sciences have been extraordinarily successful in revealing and enabling us to understand the development of the universe from the Planck era to the present, as well as the emergence of complexity, life, and consciousness here on Earth. After briefly sketching this amazing story, and the key characteristics of nature, this paper will reflect on the different types and levels of causality involved -- stressing the important and pervasive role of highly differentiated and dynamic relationships and networks of relationships. Philosophical considerations build on and enrich scientific ones to probe these relationships. They also take us beyond the limits of strictly scientific methodology to consider and model -- however inadequately -- the ultimate sources of existence and order. This is the issue of creation, which introduces another very different -- and transcendent -- level of causality. We show that this is compatible with the -- and even essential to -- the causalities operative in nature, including those of quantum cosmology, if we acknowledge the limits of physics.

This lecture was delivered by George Ellis during the 16th Kraków Methodological Conference "The Causal Universe", May 17-18, 2012.


Via Bernard Ryefield, Complexity Institute
Eli Levine's insight:

I've said it several times before.

 

It's going to take a change in the logic of politics, a different program, as it were, to operate and produce a new base level of hardware.  We are bound by some of the lower levels of physics, biology and psychology and the realities of the economic market.  These are the lower level, mechanistic laws that have to be obeyed first, in order to realize what ought to be a common goal of leading relatively happy, prosperous, sustainable and resilient lives.

 

But the politics, by engaging in a different logic that's not meant to benefit only the well to do, will ultimately save itself from collapse and destruction (ironically, the big goal for conservatives, who are so keen on implementing these boot-licking, elite worshipping and poor-punishing programs and policies) and produce a new effect from the established lower level laws that could, potentially, mitigate against major economic and social collapses that, ultimately, ruins the politics as well.

 

Way cool stuff here.  Very relevant for government and governing policy.

 

Think about it.

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Andrew Glynn's curator insight, January 14, 2014 8:37 AM

As I keep repeating ad nauseum, bottom up causality doesn't work when you go from things of a lower genera (subsystems) to things of a higher genera (system, which may themselves be subsystems of even higher genera).

António F Fonseca's curator insight, January 25, 2014 5:57 AM

Very interesting from the philosophical point of view.

Zaphod Beeblebrox's curator insight, January 30, 2014 1:39 PM

This really brings up the question - what is the nature of choice inherent in the universe?  If causality defines itself as the operation of a cause onto a single, definable effect, then how does it relate to the POSSIBILITES that exist as a consequence of probability and human limitation?  In other words, can physics be the perpatrator of - and therefore the potential predictor of - what can be viewed as choice as an inexorable consequence of the surrounding conditions?

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Overseeing and Managing Complex Adaptive Systems

Overseeing and Managing Complex Adaptive Systems | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
To govern a complex system, you must first have knowledge of the system in the strictest of senses.  You must recognize that you are intrinsically apart of that system as a node in the network, whi...
Eli Levine's insight:

It's layers and layers of interconnected and inter-related stuff.


Think about it.

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SA mine strike damage 'irreparable'

SA mine strike damage 'irreparable' | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Leaders of South Africa's platinum mines have said the nine-week long strike by workers has caused 'irreparable' damage and cost the sector nearly $1bn.
Eli Levine's insight:

What are the profits that are being realized?

 

Because if they can take almost a billion American dollars in dents due to the worker's strike, than they can take a 50% increase in worker's pay.

 

You start laying people off for this, you're going to get civil war on your hands as people begin to starve for the mining company's greed.

 

And it's all thanks to Capitalism and the leadership of the ANC that this has fallen into such disarray, because if the ANC had been governing for the sake of workers and not for the sake of mining businesses' profits, this whole dispute would probably have played out differently.

 

Silly brains.

 

It's just money at a certain point!

 

Let the workers have some when you clearly can afford to spend it.


Think about it!

 

 

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Art of listening: Build relationships by fine-tuning your listening skills

Art of listening: Build relationships by fine-tuning your listening skills | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it

“Listening is an attitude of the heart, a genuine desire to be with another which both attracts and heals.” — Anonymous


“We do this when we listen,” she said. “ It’s also incredibly important that we listen to ourselves so we can understand and meet our own needs for self-care. That way we are better able to care for others. These acts of listening and caring for ourselves first is the realm of self-compassion.”

So what makes a good listener?

================================

Good listeners show genuine interest in

what’s being said and show empathy

to the speaker by caring.

==============


Via Edwin Rutsch
Eli Levine's insight:

More than anything, a lack of listening, understanding and probing for the truth is what leads to the biggest failures in policy and decision making.

 

Just look at the mess that the US and Russia have created out of the Ukrainian situation.  Look what the Ukrainian government could have done in order to stave off Russian intervention and aggression.  It may not have worked in keeping the Russians out.  However, by embracing the Russian-speaking Ukrainians in government and in society, the Ukrainian-speaking population may have been able to give themselves a stronger point of argumentation against the Russian incursion into Crimea.  The failure to acknowledge both Russia's concerns about NATO taking over in Ukraine, plus the legitimate economic and social concerns of the ethnic Russians in Eastern and Southern Ukraine is probably what at least partially led to the current state of affairs in Ukraine.

 

And the US, for our part, failed to acknowledge, listen and abide by the other peoples' interests as well, choosing instead to small-selfishly pursue our own ends regardless of the costs and consequences of that pursuit in the grand scheme of things.

 

Think about it.

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Betty Skeet's curator insight, March 26, 2014 4:07 AM

This applies to all of us in any of our roles in children's lives: parents, grandparents, carers, teachers, early years workers, you name it...

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Team examines city life on the urban continuum

Over the past few centuries, human societies have changed dramatically. We travel, make things, treat illnesses and communicate in ways our ancestors could have never imagined.

All this has led some to conclude that human societies are fundamentally different today than they were in the past, but I’m not so sure. Some research I’ve been doing lately suggests just the opposite: Our technologies might have changed in amazing ways, but our societies still follow some of the same basic rules that shaped ancient civilizations.


Via NESS
Eli Levine's insight:

"History doesn't repeat itself, but it does rhyme." -Mark Twain

 

It's all organic to us, as a species.  It makes sense that it gets replicated across time and space, culture and nation.

 

This is indeed a more mathematical universe than we could ever have expected.

 

Let's hope that we're able to use this knowledge and technology and put it to good use, before the psychopaths of our current elite and the idiot cattle of our masses destroy our world through their actions and lack of action.

 

Think about it.

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RSA - Beyond boom and bust

RSA - Beyond boom and bust | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it

Swinging between the regulations of government and the excesses of the market has proven flaws, says Michael Thompson. Here he outlines how cultural theory can offer a new economic paradigm

"It’s déja vu all over again," Yogi Berra once declared, and many of those who have now experienced the credit crunch and its subsequent financial and economic turmoil will be inclined to agree with him.

In the 1980s, Arthur Seldon, the founder of Britain’s staunchly (some might say rabidly) pro-market Institute of Economic Affairs, conceded that there was one worthwhile task to which its rival and newly opened think tank - the left-of-centre Institute for Public Policy Research - should address itself. Privatisation, he said (in a letter to The Independent), had been the great and unqualified triumph of the preceding decade but even he had to admit that, when everything that could successfully be privatised had been privatised, a limit would have been reached. If the new think tank could determine where that limit lay, then that, he conceded, would be something well worth knowing.

Arthur Seldon died in 2005 and so did not live to see the enormous wave of collapses and nationalisations that has swept away so much of the privatisation he had championed (and, indeed, the demise of a fair few outfits that were firmly in the ‘private goods’ category before he even set out on his crusade).

 


Via Alessandro Cerboni
Eli Levine's insight:

That would be nice.  I'm not sure about his modeling, but it makes sense that a combination of various actors and factors working collaboratively together towards a compromised interest with a shared end in mind could work out.  The root of everything is survival, everything else is just cream.

 

Why not start there?

Think about it.

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Hillary Clinton has begun laying out foreign-policy positions that sound more hard-line than Obama's

Hillary Clinton has begun laying out foreign-policy positions that sound  more hard-line than Obama's | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Hillary Clinton has begun laying out foreign-policy positions that sound a more hard-line note on Iran, Russia and other global trouble spots than is coming from President Barack Obama.
Eli Levine's insight:

This is making me more concerned that Hillary will not so much be an effective leader of our society, but rather a follower of those who have the worst track record of making decisions for our country and with regards to all other societies on planet Earth.  Because of this ineffectiveness from what will seem to be all sectors of our government, the society itself will begin, slowly at first and most assuredly, begin to move around the government with the conscious or unconscious intention to destroy it in its present incarnation.

 

I've said this from her first run back in the 2008 primaries: she's too conservative of a person to really be an effective leader.  Too ingrained with the present system to really be of value to it and the larger social systems that are around it.

 

This is just a confirmation to me that, she will play the traditional politically bumbling role of neither really addressing the problems effectively.  Therefore she, and the entire political system that she's going to likely be representing, is going to collapse, if not under her watch, than other someone else's watch.

 

All of this was and is brought on by the private elites and conservatives who wish to keep society in this seriously defunct method of functioning and the inability of the American people to get out of the paper bag that was placed over their heads.

 

Silly people, all around.

 

Think about it.

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