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We are close to eating bait fish and jelly fish as big fish numbers in oceans plummet

We are close to eating bait fish and jelly fish as big fish numbers in oceans plummet | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it

"When you're young, you look at the world and think what you see has been that way for a long time. When you're 5, everything feels "normal." When things change in your lifetime, you may regret what has changed, but for your children, born 30 years later into a more diminished world, what they see at 5 becomes their new "normal," and so, over time, "normal" is constantly being redefined to mean "less." And people who don't believe that the past was so different from the present might have what could be called "change blindness blindness." Because these changes happen slowly, over a human lifetime, they never startle. They just tiptoe silently along, helping us all adjust to a smaller, shrunken world."


Since 1950, one in four of the world’s fisheries has collapsed due to overfishing. 77 percent of the world's marine fish stocks are fully exploited, over-exploited, depleted or slowly recovering. The cod fishery off Newfoundland, Canada collapsed in 1992, leading to the loss of some 40,000 jobs in the industry. Twenty years later, the fishery has yet to recover.


Scientists estimate that 90% of the world’s large fish have been removed from our oceans, including many tuna, sharks, halibut, grouper, and other top level predators which help maintain an ecological balance. Of the 3.5 million fishing vessels worldwide, only 1.7 percent are classified as large-scale, industrial vessels, yet these vessels take almost 60 percent of the global fish catch.


Tuna purse seine vessels using Fish Aggregating Devices entangle and kill a million sharks a year in the Indian Ocean alone. Every year, the world's fishing fleet receives roughly $30 billion in government subsidies. Most of the subsidies are given to the large-scale, industrial sector of the fishing industry.


Industrial fishing fleets kill and discard about 27 million tons of fish on average each year. That means that one-quarter of the annual marine fish catch is thrown overboard dead. For every kilo of shrimp landed, over 10 kilos of tropical marine life is caught and dies.

 

Bottom trawling, a fishing method which involves dragging giant nets and chains across the seafloor, damages fragile corals and sponges which provide habitat for fish and creates scars on the ocean bottom which can even be visible from space.

 

Globally more than US$20 billion is lost to pirate fishing each year, much of which involves European or Asian vessels. The United Nations estimates that Somalia loses US $300 million a year to the pirates; Guinea loses US $100 million.

 

The Patagonian toothfish (often sold as Chilean sea bass) fisheries around Crozet, Prince Edward and Marion Islands were fished to commercial extinction in just two years.

 

Commercial fishing boats also kill tens of thousands of albatrosses and hundreds of thousands of other seabirds, mostly by longline fishing.  Considering that albatrosses can live 50+ years, and take over 5 years to reach breeding age, this is an unsustainable loss of a truly impressive species.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Eli Levine's insight:

Indeed, there are likely to be big consequences for this mass die off that we haven't even begun to realize.

 

Animals have an effect on the environment, very much like us.  They play a role in sustaining and shaping the environment.  When we kill off a species, we break a piece of the delicate web of the environment in which we evolved and adapted to, such that our lives could be put at risk as a result of the extinction or die off of a species.  It's the tiny changes which have the largest impact on our world, yet we are having a tremendously large impact on the world for the sake of economic activity and money that, ideally, should come second or third to our collective health.  Goodness knows what this is going to yield for us as we wipe out top predators and prey alike, whose natural cycles of birth and death lead to the sustenance of .the environment in which we evolved and adapted into.

 

Why do we care about money, if we're not able  to spend it in our lifetime?  Why do we care about it if its accumulation leads to our death on the individual and collective levels?

 

Think about it.

 

Because this could very well be the final curtain for humanity, because of humanity.  And yet, will anyone listen or care to listen about these things?

Silly maladjusted and dysfunctional brains.

 

Think about it.

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Low wage jobs are dominating the U.S. recovery

Low wage jobs are dominating the U.S. recovery | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
A new report finds that the U.S. job market might be in even worse shape than we thought. Nearly 58 percent of the jobs that have come back since the recession ended are in low-wage industries. In many cases, they're replacing higher-wage jobs that were lost in the first place.
Eli Levine's insight:
Well, this is going to make the overall recovery a trickle, rather than a torrent. Honestly, profits may be high, but what good do profits do if they're just going to be sitting idly in the coffers of the businesses? It's not like they share the wealth out to their shareholders with regular dividends. After all, the usual practice is that you only get your dividends when you sell your stock. Therefore, where's even the shareholders' cut of the profit, let alone the workers' cut for doing the actual money making? What good do those profits do for anyone other than the top executives of the companies? And, why is it that we're accepting these conditions from them? For what purpose? For what reason? Think about it.
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The Democratization of Violence

The Democratization of Violence | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
One of the hallmarks of a fully fledged and functional civilization, is that the legitimate use of violence is limited to one institution, one group of people, rather than being dispersed throughou...
Eli Levine's insight:

Thus, the natural cycle comes into full force.  The abusers eventually get the boot, while society is left to pick up the pieces afterward.

 

A shame, really.

 

And, society will be all the less inclined to submit now, even for its own sake and benefit, due to the abuses of people in power over the rest of the population.

 

Silly cycle.

 

Silly humanity.

 

Think about it.

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Rescooped by Eli Levine from Empathy and Compassion
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NIH VideoCast - His Holiness the Dalai Lama - The Role of Science in Human Flourishing

NIH VideoCast - His Holiness the Dalai Lama - The Role of Science in Human Flourishing | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it

Wednesday Afternoon Lectures 

Friday, March 07, 2014

We are delighted to have His Holiness the Dalai Lama present the annual NIH J. Edward Rall Cultural Lecture in the Ruth L. Kirschstein Auditorium, Natcher Conference Center. The title of his talk will be “The Role of Science in Human Flourishing.”


Via Edwin Rutsch
Eli Levine's insight:

Science: it's just the method we use to test to see whether things are, aren't or are something other than what we had thought of before.

 

I don't get for what reason it becomes so political or regarded with so much hostility by some whose  beliefs are out of line with the common reality in which we are living.

 

Silly brains.

 

Think about it.

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Erdogan criticises Twitter ruling

Erdogan criticises Twitter ruling | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
The Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan criticises a ruling by the constitutional court which lifted a controversial ban on Twitter.
Eli Levine's insight:

I think Mr. Erdogan is failing to accept and appreciate the fact that, while his party is able to command popular support in the local elections, he may not be so successful when it comes to his own election.  Turkey seems to be ok with these kinds of authoritarian behaviors and gestures.  However, one has to wonder how the Turkish polity and society will look upon these attempts to reign in the Internet in order to maintain "control" of the government and the country.

 

It is a sign of weakness, at least in my eyes, when a leader resorts to these kinds of tactics and maneuvers.  I have no idea how Turks in Turkey actually view this situation, unfortunately.

 

Enjoy watching the fur fly.

 

Think about it.

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Want Effective Government? Then You Have to Pay Decent Salaries

Want Effective Government? Then You Have to Pay Decent Salaries | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
The ranks of civil servants face miserable brain drain if Congress persists with pay freezes, benefit cuts, and badmouthing dedicated employees.
Eli Levine's insight:

Again, anyone who thinks they don't need an effective government in place, has likely never experienced life without it.  Somalia, Afghanistan, Pakistan, any instance where government was not around to effectively handle some social, economic, environmental problem that we persistently have around.  We need a cost effective, appropriately sized and managed, and well staffed government in order to support our larger-than-hunter-gatherer sized band societies.

 

The problem of excessive government comes into play when government fails to appreciate the society's ability to have capacity of its own to solve some of its problems partially or fully.  It is a question of having respect and knowledge towards and about the other that is being subjected to the government's actions and policies, which I'm sure, is a culture that can be instilled, replicated and spread throughout the government's agencies, such that we're able to pull off a more effective, more professional government that is motivated to serve society and all of the people who live in it.  The first step is to clear out our elected officials.

 

Prima donnas and senseless buffoons who don't understand where their actual interests lie, as public officials, or have the sense in order to do their jobs well, if at all.

 

Think about it.

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Rescooped by Eli Levine from The Great Transition
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There's a Class War Going On and the Poor Are Getting Their Butts Kicked | TIME

There's a Class War Going On and the Poor Are Getting Their Butts Kicked | TIME | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Although they say they're concerned about inequality, economic policymakers continue to pummel low-income families and the jobless, and that’s bad for all of us

Via Willy De Backer
Eli Levine's insight:

When you allow Capitalism to go laissez-faire, it leads to the rich getting richer while everyone else loses in the long term.  Wealth accumulates wealth, just as larger cities are able to attract more people and more stuff than small towns.

 

I do not believe we should tamper with the market itself.  I think we should be more proactive in making sure that people are compensated for the value of their labor, protected from the avarice and greed of a handful of people and that the environment is maintained in such a way that we're able to inhabit it and derive our wealth (in terms of goods and services) sustainably from it.

 

What good is profit if it's not just sitting around?  What good is wealth if it kills you to get it?

The economic policy makers are included in this picture too.  It's not like they're leaving this planet.  Even if they are, wouldn't we technically be better off without them?

 

We started from having zero monetary wealth, after all.

 

Think about it.

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Willy De Backer's curator insight, April 3, 2014 3:34 PM

Time goes Marx...

Rescooped by Eli Levine from The urban.NET
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Return to civilization | #socialchange #urbanism

most people disagree with me about change in urban design — so don't be surprised if you also think i'm an idiot.

Via Claude Emond, luiy
Eli Levine's insight:

Very interesting.

 

I don't get for what reason this is so controversial or political.  There are technical merits to it, there are drawbacks to it.  Ultimately we have to adapt to the environment in which we are, actually, living and produce a world in which we're able to survive and be well, not just one in which a few people can be so rich that they can't spend the amount of money that they have in a lifetime.

 

This has a lot of cool stuff in it, and I suggest checking it out.  The cities on the coasts are likely to be swamped in the course of natural disasters, and the population of Earth is rapidly urbanizing as is, without much planning or provision of resources, in spite of abundance in our global human society.

 

Again, I can see how these things become political and controversial.  I just don't get for what purpose or reason.

 

Think about it.

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A New View of Society, Economy, the Environment and Government

A New View of Society, Economy, the Environment and Government | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it

Food, energy, a desire to improve, human-habitable environmental conditions, raw materials and a population are the root ingredients of an economy.  It's best for the government to not interfere wi...

Eli Levine's insight:
Buddha said "Words have the power to both destroy and heal. When words are both true and kind, they can change our world". I wonder what my words are doing. Think about it.
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Exxon Mobil says climate change unlikely to stop it selling fossil fuels

Exxon Mobil says climate change unlikely to stop it selling fossil fuels | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Oil and gas giant issues report on the risks that climate change policies could pose to the value of its assets and future profitability

Via Willy De Backer
Eli Levine's insight:

Sad, isn't it.


The change will only come when policy makers make a conscientious effort to change the incentives and the outcomes of the present economic and social system.  It is time that we ask ourselves, "what do we value more?"

Business?

Profits?

Or society?

Well being?

And survival?

Think about it.

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Willy De Backer's curator insight, April 1, 2014 3:26 PM

Exxon admits it is f...ing with the climate -  let's bring on the lawyers. Let's organise to start court case against fossil fuel industry.

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Up-to-Date Lessons from Adam Smith

Up-to-Date Lessons from Adam Smith | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Adam Smith has taught me me that government policy has significant consequences for the function and net social/environmental results that are accomplished.  He taught me the importance of maintain...
Eli Levine's insight:

It's a shame how poorly represented Mr. Smith's work is in the world.  We're just now beginning to re-learn the economy as a system; a network of exchanges rather than as a collection of linear, equilibrium models.

 

Furthermore, it's a shame that Mr. Smith's work has come to justify some of the most egregious behavior that even he would consider damaging to the economy and, indeed, damaging to the environment and the society whose people he clearly loved and cared for.

 

More work is needed to re-learn the economy in terms of this dynamic, non-linear, non-equilibrium and empirically based systemic logic.  Until that time, the theory that's behind it needs to be rehashed. 

 

Adam Smith needs to come back from the dead in order to expunge the lies that have been written about his work, along with Darwin, Jesus and Buddha, to re-teach humanity how to be in this universe sustainably and happily, rather than unsustainably and unhappily.

 

Think about it.

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The Strange New Science of Chaos - YouTube

A 1989 program, with Lorenz


Via Bernard Ryefield
Eli Levine's insight:

I <3 Science.

It just keeps learning more and more about the universe, ourselves and ourselves within the universe.

It doesn't stop, until we stop.

 

The lessons that are discussed here are applicable to our social sciences and questions of governance, especially the non-linear nature of society, economy and social psychology and the importance of initial conditions.

 

It's not a stable universe.

 

And we're living and apart of the instability!

 

Think about it.

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Vasileios Basios's curator insight, April 1, 2014 9:43 AM

Wow! such a rare delightful material .... Ralph Abraham and Lorenz who could imagine!

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, April 16, 2014 8:31 AM

to be watched by the new generations!  old certitudes and new doubts?

Liz Rykert's curator insight, April 19, 2014 9:56 PM

Great to hear Lorenz

Rescooped by Eli Levine from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
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The Neuroscience Of Imagination

The Neuroscience Of Imagination | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Understanding how imagination works could be the key to daydreaming yourself into a sharper, more creative person. 

"Use your imagination." You've probably heard this phrase since before you can remember.

It was your imagination you were using to create your first finger painting; your imagination that let you visualize what it might be like to make out with your high school crush; your imagination that helped you dream up the idea for your business or book or the house you'll one day build.

But when you use your imagination, what exactly is at work?

Try this: Close your eyes and imagine a bowl of fruit. This is pretty simple. You might see some apples and oranges, bananas, maybe a bunch of grapes. Probably, you've seen enough bowls of fruit in your life to call a stored-up image to mind with little effort.


Via Sandeep Gautam, Alessandro Cerboni
Eli Levine's insight:

On one hand, the imagination is a world of hallucinations and opinions that have no grounding in reality and no basis in facts.

 

On the other hand, it is the design space in our minds to create a much wider array of stuff than is in the actual universe, such that we can figure out new ways of operating on and in this plane of existence.

 

It must always be checked out against the long and short term effects of those actions in the real world.  It is useful to have this portable design space in order to problem solve and bring about new innovations for our world.  The trouble comes when people live in their imaginations rather than try to be aware of how their imaginative thoughts are only just thoughts until they are proven (or disproven) to be otherwise.

 

Think about it.

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Why People Secretly Fear Creative Ideas — PsyBlog

Why People Secretly Fear Creative Ideas — PsyBlog | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it

Why creative ideas are often rejected in favour of conformity and uniformity.

Does society really value creativity? People say they want more creative people, more creative ideas and solutions, but do they really?

For one thing teachers don’t generally like creative students. Primary school teachers in one study liked the most creative kids the least (Westby & Dawson, 1995). This isn’t an isolated finding in education and probably a result of the fact that creative kids are generally more disruptive; naturally they don’t like to follow the rules.

For all the talk of creativity in business, industry and academia, there’s evidence that it’s implicitly discouraged in these areas as well. Although leaders of organisations say they want creative ideas, the evidence suggests creativity gets rejected in favour of conformity and uniformity (Staw, 1995 cited in Mueller et al., 2011).

Abstract

People often reject creative ideas, even when espousing creativity as a desired goal. To explain this paradox, we propose that people can hold a bias against creativity that is not necessarily overt and that is activated when people experience a motivation to reduce uncertainty. In two experiments, we manipulated uncertainty using different methods, including an uncertainty-reduction prime. The results of both experiments demonstrated the existence of a negative bias against creativity (relative to practicality) when participants experienced uncertainty. Furthermore, this bias against creativity interfered with participants’ ability to recognize a creative idea. These results reveal a concealed barrier that creative actors may face as they attempt to gain acceptance for their novel ideas.
http://pss.sagepub.com/content/23/1/13.full.pdf+html


Via Alessandro Cerboni
Eli Levine's insight:

I'll be one of the first people to say that creativity has its limits.  There are only so many functional designs in the design space of our universe, that you can't have all of the cool, but unworkable ideas put into place or accepted.

 

However, you need people who look at things in a variety of different ways, in order to land at something which we can approximately call objective truth.

 

Take the definition of "wealth" for example.  There are several academic definitions of what constitutes wealth, each one sort of adding a new layer of complexity and richness to the others.  You cannot just have a nebulous and ethereal definition, but at the same time, you can't have one definitive definition that truly will be above falsification, editing and revision (especially if you attempt to get at the real nitty gritty definitions of what constitutes wealth).

 

This anti-creative thinking is something that I've faced since I was a small child.  Humans are basically a conservative species.  We like rules, order, certainty and consistency from our environment.  The ability to change on the individual level is severely limited by our biology, and the social pressure to conform and maintain a definition of normalcy simply adds to the conservatism of the species.  We don't seek innovation, unless we want something out of it, and we don't change anything unless or until it causes catastrophic failure for the individual or the collective society and even that change is debatable after looking at the fall out from the French, Russian, Chinese and Iranian revolutions.  The only change that is possible are those changes we have the capacity within ourselves to make.  That is limited, again, by individual biology and environmental factors.

 

I do not doubt that humanity will find clever ways that work to solve its problems.  What is in doubt, as far as I'm concerned, is our willingness to entertain and experiment with those ideas in time for us to make any use of them.  Change and uncertainty are the only constants that are going to be with us.  Might as well learn to live with them.

 

Silly conservative humans.

 

Think about it.

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Behavioral and Network Origins of Wealth Inequality: Insights from a Virtual World

Almost universally, wealth is not distributed uniformly within societies or economies. Even though wealth data have been collected in various forms for centuries, the origins for the observed wealth-disparity and social inequality are not yet fully understood. Especially the impact and connections of human behavior on wealth could so far not be inferred from data. Here we study wealth data from the virtual economy of the massive multiplayer online game (MMOG) Pardus. This data not only contains every player's wealth at every point in time, but also all actions of every player over a timespan of almost a decade. We find that wealth distributions in the virtual world are very similar to those in western countries. In particular we find an approximate exponential for low wealth and a power-law tail. The Gini index is found to be 0.65, which is close to the indices of many Western countries. We find that wealth-increase rates depend on the time when players entered the game. Players that entered the game early on tend to have remarkably higher wealth-increase rates than those who joined later. Studying the players' positions within their social networks, we find that the local position in the trade network is most relevant for wealth. Wealthy people have high in- and out-degree in the trade network, relatively low nearest-neighbor degree and a low clustering coefficient. Wealthy players have many mutual friendships and are socially well respected by others, but spend more time on business than on socializing. We find that players that are not organized within social groups with at least three members are significantly poorer on average. We observe that high `political' status and high wealth go hand in hand. Wealthy players have few personal enemies, but show animosity towards players that behave as public enemies.


Via Bernard Ryefield
Eli Levine's insight:

When you let laissez-faire take its course, only a few individuals really end up on top.  That's not to say that markets shouldn't be allowed and enabled to exist, for the sake of the free exchange of goods, services, knowledge, wealth, etc.  It is saying that we need non-intrusive mechanisms to help make sure that the wealth that is produced is enjoyed by everyone who produced it.

 

Some people will always have more than others, for behavioral reasons and for circumstantial reasons.  That is not a problem, in my own view.  The problem comes, for me, when their focus on wealth becomes so great that they lose sight of their human needs on the individual as well as social and environmental levels, such that they choose wealth that they will not use over that which they need for survival and physical/psychological well being.

 

It's a form of being disconnected with the real world, kind of like schizophrenia.  The brain isn't functioning properly when  greed is and has taken over, for one reason or another.  It should be considered a mental illness that we could, potentially in time, treat, such that these individuals who are not aware and do not care to be aware of their actual place in the universe can lead normal, happy, healthy and appropriately placed lives in our societies.

 

So, we're left with the present situation in which work is undervalued, relative to what it produces, while executive management is way overvalued relative to its healthy role in the economy and society.  I'm not saying that pure equality is desirable, because sometimes people do work harder than others and deserve a greater share of wealth than someone who didn't work when they honestly could have.  What I'm saying, is that indulging the elite's fantasy of the ego is detrimental to themselves and to others, and that I don't think it should be accepted or tolerated within our social world.

 

If you want equality of opportunities, you must have more equality of outcomes.  That is yet another fact about our world that conservatives fail to accept and appreciate, if they're attempting to realize a world in which we are all together as one, rather than a world where we are heavily stratified according to an artificial hierarchy.  That is the difference between a conservative and a progressive.  One wants us all to be living together in peace, harmony, stability and, for want of a better word, love, while the other just wants everyone in a specific place according to birth.  One promotes democracy and inclusivity, the other, discourages it.  One works better for humanity on the tangible level, the other, does not.

 

And it's just a difference in brain type/values that makes them be something so antithetical to what Western civilization has stood for.

 

Think about it.

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How 3D Printing Creates On-Demand Swarms of Disposable Drones

How 3D Printing Creates On-Demand Swarms of Disposable Drones | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it

New advances in 3D printing are making it not only possible but also viable to manufacture cheap, print-on-demand, disposable drones designed simply to soar off over the horizon and never come back. Some British engineers did just that, and this is only the beginning. The team hails from the Advanced Manufacturing Research Center (AMRC) at the University of Sheffield, where they're exploring innovative ways to 3D-print complex designs. They built their disposable drone, a five-foot-wide guy made of just nine parts that looks like a tiny stealth bomber, using a technique called fused deposition modeling. This additive manufacturing technique has been around since the 1980s but has recently become faster and cheaper thanks to improved design processes.


The ultimate vision, as sUAS describes it, is for "cheap and potentially disposable UAVs that could be built and deployed in remote situations potentially within as little as 24 hours." Forward-operating teams equipped with 3D printers could thus generate their own semi-autonomous micro air force squadrons or airborne surveillance swarms, a kind of first-strike desktop printing team hurling disposable drones into the sky.


For now, the AMRC team's drone works well as a glider, and they're working on a twin ducted fan propulsion system. It will eventually get an autonomous operation system powered by GPS as well as on-board data logging of flight parameters. Presumably, someone will want to stick a camera on there, too. If they're successful at building these things cheaply enough, it will be a green flag for the rest of the industry to take a hard look at their designs and see if they can make a disposable drone, too.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Eli Levine's insight:

This is going to get ugly.

 

The arms race between the people and the government is just beginning. 

 

Cause, I can think of all sorts of mayhem that can be raised with this technology, all of it spontaneously generated from the conditions in which people are living, caused primarily by our elite factions, public and private alike.

 

You SURE you want to be holding those reigns of "power" when they come for you?

 

Think about it.

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'Shocked' Senate votes on CIA report

'Shocked' Senate votes on CIA report | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
The US Senate Intelligence Committee recommends the publication of part of its report into the "brutal" CIA interrogation of terror suspects.
Eli Levine's insight:

So, it's ok to spy on your constituents and other civilians, but it is not ok to spy on the Senators and their staff....?

And Congress' members wonder how it is that they compose the most unpopular institution of our government.

 

Upper class prima donnas and morons.

 

Think about it.

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The Must-Have Habitudes of Effective 21st Century Leaders | Switch and Shift

The Must-Have Habitudes of Effective 21st Century Leaders | Switch and Shift | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
The conversation around must-have, 21st century leadership skills has been in full swing for years. From business to education; classroom to community, the
Eli Levine's insight:

A far cry from the days of Captain Kirk.  I wonder if this is a passing phase of culture, or a realization of something deeper that has always been with us.

 

Think about it.

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The Key to Happiness: Brainpower or Social Connectedness? — PsyBlog

The Key to Happiness: Brainpower or Social Connectedness? — PsyBlog | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it

Relationships have stronger associations with happiness than academic achievement, according to a recent study.

Whilst strong social relationships in childhood and adolescence were associated with happier adults, the associations with academic achievement were much lower.

The study used data from 804 New Zealanders who had been followed over 32 years to compare the relative importance of social connectedness and academic success (Olsson et al., 2012).

 

 


Via Alessandro Cerboni
Eli Levine's insight:

It makes sense that being social is a more effective path to being happy than being intelligent or smart.

 

Trouble is, folks who are smart yet aren't as social or socially inclined are needed in this world, because without us, the species is more likely to crash itself in a fit of sociability rather than intelligence and sense.

 

We're a funny group of individuals.

 

Think about it.

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Poll: Elizabeth Warren is the ‘hottest’

Poll: Elizabeth Warren is the ‘hottest’ | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
If the 2016 presidential race were a game of “hot or not,” Sen. Elizabeth Warren would be winning with former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton close behind, and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie would be losing ground, according to a new poll. When Americans were asked to give prominent politicians a score, zero to 100, of how “warm,”...
Eli Levine's insight:

It's funny what could happen to you, as a politician, if you simply backed the people over the bankers, the corporate executives and all those private interests who simply have money.

 

Imagine if you simply did the right thing for the sake of the general public, and then reminded the people the value of your work on a constant and regular basis.

 

Think about it.

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From Crystal Ball to Magic Wand: The New World Order in Times of Digital Revolution

From Crystal Ball to Magic Wand: The New World Order in Times of Digital Revolution. Dirk Helbing, ETH Zurich. Talk delivered via skype on March 24, 2014, to the AAAI workshop on THE INTERSECTION OF ROBUST INTELLIGENCE AND TRUST IN AUTONOMOUS SYSTEMS

 

We need another Apollo project, but this time focusing on our Earth. I am ready for this, are you?

Please watch this movie to the end.
The solution to our world's problems is different from what many strategic thinkers believed.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AErRh_yDr-Q


Via Complexity Digest
Eli Levine's insight:

I'm not perfect, but I'd say I've done a reasonably good job at predicting these things happening.

 

You have economic pinches, combined with aspirations towards ideals, of course you're going to have Arab Springs!  Furthermore, you have governments that are not following along according to the newly expressed needs of the people, you're more likely to get unrest, violence and increase the POTENTIAL for overthrow of your whole system of governance and economics (speaking, of course, with regards to Egypt especially).  Better to improve your odds and adapt yourself to the new normal of the society's needs (which are fairly consistent throughout time, space and culture).

 

What on Earth are our current policy-makers doing by persisting with the overly-cozy relationship with the private elite and their philosophies over the actual, presented needs of the general public?  Where is their more accurate view of humanity, themselves and the various needs and functions of humanity?

 

Seriously?

And I'm the one on the outside.

 

Think about it.

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Rescooped by Eli Levine from Non-Equilibrium Social Science
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Joseph E. Stiglitz asks what role government should play as economic restructuring proceeds

Joseph E. Stiglitz asks what role government should play as economic restructuring proceeds | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Many of China’s problems today stem from too much market and too little government. Or, to put it another way, while the government is clearly doing some things that it should not, it is also not doing some things that it should.

Via NESS
Eli Levine's insight:

Unfortunately, the CCP quashed the Populists under Bo Xilai and put into power a conservative who only seems concerned with tightening things under him while neglecting to effectively tend to the problems within his society and geographical territory.  Lots of sword rattling against Japan, the Philippines, and Vietnam; lots of putting down dissidents and Tibetan/Uigher nationalists.  There are some high profile corruption cases being put out.  However, nothing systemic or far reaching or sustainable seems to be being done for the sake of the people of China.  One would wonder what would indeed happen to the reigns of the CCP if they let market liberalization allocate resources out of the hands of the CCP members, such that new factions take ownership.  China is not a country that has historically done well when a multitude of factions are competing for the centralized control of the government.  One can only shudder at the implications for the rest of the world's economy and geo-political/social-political orders as a result of that kind of collapse.

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US political donation limits quashed

US political donation limits quashed | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
The US Supreme Court strikes down overall contribution limits for individual political donors, in a major ruling on campaign finance.
Eli Levine's insight:

When a democratic government fails to function as a democratic government; responsive and accountable to the rich and powerful, the public will find other means of achieving their ends over and above the small "self" interests of the existing rich and "powerful".  The private empire will fall, just like all the other empires that have existed to date. 

 

In this particular case, it is because they failed to take into account the world beyond profiteering and personal profit making when factoring in all the calculations that are needed in order to produce these effects.  The public is only going to get angrier and angrier, as the government drifts further and further from tending to its needs.  There will either be a new traitor to their class of ilk, from their class of ilk or there will be a kind of social revolution in the United States that will put the individual back on par with the rest of the society and the environment  that the individual depends on.

 

Think about it.

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Rescooped by Eli Levine from The Cultural & Economic Landscapes
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The Fascinating Neuroscience Of Color

The Fascinating Neuroscience Of Color | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
This seemingly simple area of study offers insights into all sorts of behavior--from attention to decision-making.

Via Alison D. Gilbert
Eli Levine's insight:

Wow.....

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, March 31, 2014 9:26 AM

A fascinating article about the study of the 'neuroscience' of color.

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, March 31, 2014 10:35 AM

Fascinating article on the study of color from a scientific perspective. See my replies to the comments and please let me know what you think. 

Rescooped by Eli Levine from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
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Reduce Bias In Analysis: Why Should We Care? (Or: The Effects Of Evidence Weighting On Cognitive Bias And Forecasting Accuracy)

Reduce Bias In Analysis: Why Should We Care? (Or: The Effects Of Evidence Weighting On Cognitive Bias And Forecasting Accuracy) | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it

We have done much work in the past on mitigating the effects of cognitive biases in intelligence analysis, as have others. This post, however, is indicative of where we think cognitive bias research should go (and in our case, is going) in the future.  Bottomline: Reducing bias in intelligence analysis is not enough and may not be important at all. 
What analysts should focus on is forecasting accuracy. In fact, our current research suggests that a less biased forecast is not necessarily a more accurate forecast.  More importantly, if indeed bias does not correlate with forecasting accuracy, why should we care about mitigating its effects? In a recent experiment with 115 intel students, I investigated a mechanism that I think operates at the root of the cognitive bias polemic: Evidence weightin


Via Bonnie Hohhof
Eli Levine's insight:

It makes sense that if you just look at a given set of information from the outside world you should be able to reach some intuitive conclusions about the information.  The question then becomes whether or not the information that is presented is accurately reflecting the reality that is there in the first place.

 

This shows up in politics and government a lot, as people seek out irrelevant information to back up a pre-existing opinion or belief, rather than seek out the technical truths of the matter that are relevant to the situation at hand.  This is, unfortunately, how things get messed up pretty badly in our governing world, which then bleeds over into our social, economic and environmental worlds as well.

 

It's when we behave as lawyers instead of scientists that we run into problems; seeking for non-related facts and spins that support our bias rather than seeking out the technical truths of the matter.  It's not a difficult thing to do, for some.  But it seems that, for many in government, it is incredibly difficult indeed to focus on the reality rather than the opinion of reality.

 

Think about it.

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