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The Democratic Party's Future Is Awash in Dark Money | VICE United States

The Democratic Party's Future Is Awash in Dark Money | VICE United States | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Amid talk of a left-wing revival inspired by populists like NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio and US Senator Elizabeth Warren, corporate titans from finance to natural gas to big retail to telecom are trying t…
Eli Levine's insight:

Oh, Democrats.

 

You can't have your money and your seats at the same time.

 

One has to be sacrificed in order to save the United States from imploding.

 

The other will only hasten the economic, environmental, social and, more to the point, political implosion of the US.

 

Twits....

 

Think about it.

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Hanseatic League - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hanseatic League - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Hanseatic League (also known as the Hanse or Hansa ; Low German: , Latin: or Liga Hanseatica ) was a commercial and defensive confederation of merchant guilds and their market towns that dominated trade along the coast of Northern Europe.

Eli Levine's insight:

I'm posting about the Hanseatic League (an obscure topic for most Americans, I'm sure), because it is one of these interesting little social, political and economic dynamics that sprung up out of a necessity for order, peace and stability needed for the exchange of goods, services and capital, rose to prominence over the course of several centuries, and then dissipated due to external and internal conditions, ultimately stemming from a lack of adaptability, respect for common order and the rise of external powers (ie, changes in the social environment around them that made it not conducive for them to be around as they were).

 

Geography, both physical and social, played a key role in developing the origins of the Hansa's trade ports, routes and members.  That's probably how VIsby on Gotland (an island in the Baltic Sea, now part of Sweden) started as the league's center.  Lubeck and Hamburg formed a cooperative alliance, due to the rise of the merchant class on the heals of the German imperial aristocracy, and the rest is history.  These natural conditions on the ground then gave rise to a common economic interest, which then lead to a banding together for common defense in light of the falling Holy Roman Empire.  From there, you watch as other cities join in, and the League grows due to the economic benefits that are being realized by the merchants and also by the decline of the agricultural aristocracy under the city merchants.  The League wins a few battles, defeats the challengers, and continues to grow in influence, fighting off the governments of nobles to secure economic wealth for themselves.  However, due to what appears to be a lack of awareness of any checks on the League's leaders' power, probably led to the infighting, which then did not help with the new discoveries and advancements that were being made outside of the Hansa's jurisdiction.  National governments toppled aristocratic, and visages of popular democracy and nationalism overruled the less than effectual city-state oligarchies.  Continued reliance on old traditions, coupled with enhanced political and economic competition from outside, ended the League after a long period of time, until it was first neutered, and then put to sleep after a long period of impotency.

 

The point of this very simple walkthrough is to demonstrate how things work in our larger social world over extended periods of time. 

 

It also shows that we can predict how the lower level units are going to self-organize, based on common geographic, cultural, linguistic, social, historical, economic and political interests, should any of the present higher level social organizations (ie, the present nation-states or the super-state organizations) should collapse due to one thing or another happening in our social, economic, or environmental worlds.  This is useful for making plans for the future as it gives us some degree of understanding as to how things could play out should an x-event happen that topples the entire global order that is eroding slowly as we speak, as of May, 2014 CE. 

 

Finally, it hopefully should shine a light on the possibility of outside encounters from other planets and aspects of our universe outside of our own planet.  We cannot afford to continue thinking in terms of there only being us in the universe, especially when we already know how large it is and how probable it is that there is other intelligent life, capable of making advanced tools and gaining advanced insights into the universes' order that might make our latest works into mere ancient child's play by comparison.  If we are truly going to mitigate against all hazards, we should have a kind of Prime Directive ready to use for if we're weaker, equal or stronger than the other, such that we don't get hurt in the encounter in the myriad of ways that we can get hurt, and so that the other does not get hurt out of concern for that one day, negatively effecting us.  We live in a potentially large neighborhood of other worlds that are inhabitable by sentient life beyond our present abilities to imagine.  We already are starting to find that animals on our own planet are also more intelligent and aware of how things work than we've previously thought.  What's there to stop similar phenomenon from happening in relation to other worlds and planets?

 

Think about it.

 

Because these historical cases should be studied more in depth, using background in Complex Adaptive Systems theory.  They should shine light on how things actually work in our social, economic, political and environmental worlds and reveal to us the physics that are behind it all, such that we can program computers to give us read outs of likely and unlikely situations that might occur given our actions at present.  We can take charge of our own destiny now, as a species, through preparing and mitigating for all hazards that actually could be out there while factoring the unknown and unknowable variables and values that are at stake.  There is only so much that is new or novel in this place, and so much repetition of the same conditions and the same events over and over and over again.

 

Perhaps there is a pattern here that we should be observing, and through observation, we change the pattern?

 

Think about it.

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IBM discovers new class of ultra-tough, self-healing, recyclable plastics that could redefine almost every industry | ExtremeTech

IBM discovers new class of ultra-tough, self-healing, recyclable plastics that could redefine almost every industry | ExtremeTech | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Stop the press! IBM Research announced this morning that it has discovered a whole new class of... plastics. This might not sound quite as sexy as, say, MIT discovering a whole new state of matter -- but wait until you hear what these new plastics can do. This new class of plastics -- or more accurately, polymers -- are stronger than bone, have the ability to self-heal, are light-weight, and are 100% recyclable. The number of potential uses, spanning industries as disparate as aerospace and semiconductors, is dizzying. A new class of polymers hasn't been discovered in over 20 years -- and, in a rather novel twist, they weren't discovered by chemists: they were discovered by IBM's supercomputers.
Eli Levine's insight:

And thus, a computer takes over the design role of engineers and chemists, to produce something that neither of them would have thought feasible.

 

And then we will make lethal military and policing machines out of this self healing, solvent resistant and stronger than bone material because, you know, we're "smart" like that.

 

Show me that we can think in terms of long term consequences and possibilities, and I will ease up off of this species.

 

Until that time, ya'll can just get used to being called silly by me.

 

Enjoy.

 

Think about it.

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Do We Need Asimov's Laws?

In recent years, roboticists have made rapid advances in the technologies that are bringing closer the kind of advanced robots that Asimov envisaged. Increasingly, robots and humans are working together on factory floors, driving cars, flying aircraft and even helping around the home.
And that raises an interesting question: do we need a set of Asimov-like laws to govern the behaviour of robots as they become more advanced?

 

http://www.technologyreview.com/view/527336/do-we-need-asimovs-laws/


Via Complexity Digest
Eli Levine's insight:

Well, I will say this: robots only are capable of doing what they're programmed or commanded to do.

 

It's not like these laws are actually followed by designers.  Were that the case, there would be no such thing as Predator drones (which are technically a violation of all laws of robotics).  We can destroy ourselves with machines, quite easily.  We can make overly effective instruments of destruction and eliminate the need for our presence in the world through automation.  However, we can also benefit from machines, especially in the worlds of policy making and implants, to make us more intelligent and accurate/effective processors of reality.  I would keep the consequences of ones' actions in mind when designing machines.  However, especially in our current state, there's no guarantee of that happening.

 

So, we've got a Russian roulette thing going on now, until we become more knowledgeable and aware of what works and how things work.  We can kill or hurt ourselves severely with the development of technology, as much as we can help and heal ourselves.

 

Let the experiments begin?  No choice, already begun.

 

Onward to the edge.

 

Think about it.

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Gary Bamford's curator insight, May 17, 4:25 AM

Sign me up for the extra memory chip, current one seems to be struggling to keep up!

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Robobees: Harvard Project Funds The Engineering Of Robotic Bees Soon To Be In Flight

Robobees: Harvard Project Funds The Engineering Of Robotic Bees Soon To Be In Flight | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it

With the alarming decline in the honey bee population sweeping our globe, fear of the multi-billion dollar crop industry collapsing has been on many people’s minds. To tackle this issue, Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences has been working with staff from the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and Northeastern University’s Department of Biology to develop robot bees. And according to a new video just released, these insectoid automatons have already taken flight.


The collaborators envision that the Nature-inspired research could lead to a greater understanding of how to artificially mimic the collective behavior and “intelligence” of a bee colony; foster novel methods for designing and building an electronic surrogate nervous system able to deftly sense and adapt to changing environments; and advance work on the construction of small-scale flying mechanical devices.

 

More broadly, the scientists anticipate the devices will open up a wide range of discoveries and practical innovations, advancing fields ranging from entomology and developmental biology to amorphous computing and electrical engineering.



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Eli Levine's insight:

If we're able to figure out how to artificially mimic bee colonies, imagine what we could do with our human societies to improve effectiveness, efficiency and to clear away our delusions and non-self preservationist behavior (in terms of the larger social self that we're all apart of).

 

Imagine a world where we have coordination and cooperation, rather than competition and violence.  Imagine a world where we work to solve common problems that exist on the various scales of human society, from local to global. 

 

Imagine if we're able to eliminate the petty, chimpish aspects of our brains and psychology, to live happier, healthier lives as a more survivable and adaptable species.

 

Just think of the possibilities that we could then do, to advance both the universe and ourselves safely (because, if we're able to perceive dangers accurately, why should we advance in such dangerous fashions?)

 

I may not be down for the first generation of implants.  But I would be down for the fourth, fifth or sixth generation.

 

That's just me.

 

Think about it.

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Young people 'nothing to live for'

Young people 'nothing to live for' | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
As many as three quarters of a million young people in the UK may feel that they have nothing to live for, a study for the Prince's Trust charity claims.
Eli Levine's insight:

Yep.

 

Whoever called the unemployed life a "hammock" has never had to live in the "hammock" before.

 

It's not fun being disengaged with society.  It's not fun feeling like you're just mooching off of society to the tune of no money.  It's no fun having plans diverted, hopes dashed and dreams deferred.

 

Yet this is the model of growth that conservatives support.  It's nothing but deferential treatment for a handful of already rich and powerful people who can afford to have whatever life they choose while leaving everyone else behind to fight over the scraps.  It's antithetical to liberty, and a grave moral violation of human principles that is far worse than the surface stuff that conservatives complain so loudly about.

 

Yet we still listen to them, when this is what they consistently and constantly have produced?

 

Think about it.

 

Because we, the people, help produce the effects that we actually realize.  And it's insanely sad that we line up for this abuse at all, rather than seek alternatives when the progressives fail at what they should be doing.  Policy is nothing more than a technical field.  There are real consequences to real actions.  Why not marry the two into one?

Think about it.

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Why climb the greasy pole?

"MOST academics would view a post at an elite university like Oxford or Harvard as the crowning achievement of a career—bringing both accolades and access to better wine cellars. But scholars covet such places for reasons beyond glory and gastronomy. They believe perching on one of the topmost branches of the academic tree will also improve the quality of their work, by bringing them together with other geniuses with whom they can collaborate and who may help spark new ideas. This sounds plausible. Unfortunately, as Albert-Laszlo Barabasi of Northeastern University, in Boston (and also, it must be said, of Harvard), shows in a study published in Scientific Reports, it is not true."

 


Via Niklaus Grunwald
Eli Levine's insight:

Yep.

 

The "elites" are only elite because our society has named them as such.  if anything, it can be detrimental to reach an "elite" institution, because it may send you into a field of ego rather than substance.

 

As for myself, I just intend to do good work for other people and see where that takes me in life.  In all honesty, I'm not much of a people pleaser and am not highly motivated by the minor awards that people break themselves over to get (ie, the corner office or the preferred parking space, etc). 

 

Who knows how I'll work with the world of "professionals" when and if I get there.

 

Think about it.

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Oil 'knee-deep' after LA pipe spill

Oil 'knee-deep' after LA pipe spill | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Crude oil is knee-deep in a district of Los Angeles after 50,000 gallons spilled from a broken pipe, the fire department says.
Eli Levine's insight:

Hooray for deregulation and the pursuit of the cheapest costs!

Yay market Capitalism, and all of its wonders!

 

What good is survival, health and well being, when you could be rich instead?

 

Wouldn't money be the thing that makes everything better?

 

Seriously, enjoy your planet and ideology.

 

I wish I could be done here.

 

Think about it.

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Richest 1% Doing Best Out Of Osborne's Recovery

Richest 1% Doing Best Out Of Osborne's Recovery | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
The richest 1% have been the biggest winners out of the UK's economic recovery that has so far come about under George Osborne's chancellorship, according to official figures.

Via britishroses, Jocelyn Stoller
Eli Levine's insight:

Funny how that works.

 

Conservatives come into power, richest people do best, everyone else gets to screw off and pound sand.

 

Honestly, there's nothing mutually exclusive about growth for everyone and the satisfaction of greed.

 

Idiots.....

 

 

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Nonlinear Complexity Analysis of Brain fMRI Signals in Schizophrenia

Nonlinear Complexity Analysis of Brain fMRI Signals in Schizophrenia | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
PLOS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies from all disciplines freely available to the whole world.
Eli Levine's insight:

It seems we are, slowly and surely, working out ways to identify actual mental health conditions based on neurological science and not opinion-based subjectivity or artificial tests.

 

This is probably could be one of the bigger medical breakthroughs of human history; to KNOW how the brain works and how it relates to our behavior, attitude, perceptions, beliefs and conceptions about ourselves and the universe around us.

 

This is where research money should go, in my own humble opinion, both for the sake of studying mental health issues, as well as to understand how we make higher level decisions (for example, with regards to how we make policy decisions or execute actions), such that we're able to improve upon our abilities to perceive and work with the world that is around us.

 

Imagine being liberated from our biological constraints, such that we're able to embrace a more empathetic, understanding, comprehensive and accurate understanding about ourselves and our world.  Without this mind towards reality, we are sure to be killed or get killed by our own actions, thoughts, beliefs and hallucinations.  An ideologue is just as potentially a danger to themselves and a danger to others as an untreated person with schizophrenia.

 

Such is how it is.  Doesn't really matter what you think or how you feel about it.  Test it if you'd like cause, I'm already willing to bet 85-90% of what I've got that I'm right on this front.

 

Have fun kids!

 

Think about it.

 

Have fun.

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Could decentralized networks help save democracy? - Phys.Org

Could decentralized networks help save democracy? - Phys.Org | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan disrupted communications between his opponents when he shut down Twitter during the run-up to the country's recent election. But in doing so, he provided yet more proof of how flawed social web activism can be. Whether the lessons in Turkey are heeded could have serious consequences for democracy.

 





Via jean lievens
Eli Levine's insight:

There's got to be a program to help this along.

 

Honestly, it's not like not having control over things is mutually exclusive to maintaining power, authority and influence within a society.  Yes, you can't just force things upon people like you once did.  Technically it's never been easy to force things on people that is not organic to what they're already willing to do, if it's not feasible in the first place.  That's possibly how Attaturk was able to force a whole new alphabet and style of dress on his people and America can't even get themselves on the metric system.

 

But this seems like an easily solvable problem, if some people with coding proficiency got together to come up with a new program or app that can exist on a device without having the central framework that can be shut down. 

 

Something that simply exists on a computer and can communicate with similar chat programs without having to deal with Turkey's centralized Internet or phone companies.

 

I'm sure it can be done.

 

And my willingness to abet in such a program, in spite of someone who has aspirations to be in political power and influence in the future, is just more evidence of how confident I am that it is possible to govern a population through kindness, respect, benevolence, effective action with the ability for the general public to be able to snuff you out in the night.  If you're governing well, then you have nothing really to worry about other than the odd crazy person or incident that will always be there.

 

When the government is more preoccupied with its own survival over the needs of its own people, then it is a sign as to how weak, incompetent and poorly prioritized the government's members are and how desperately they need to change for their own sakes at the very least.  If they cannot or will not change, then it would behoove them to step aside and let someone or something else govern, because that move would save them a lot of time, energy, effort and hassle, not to mention from the anger and wrath of the general public.

 

It's coming.

 

I'm shocked that no one seems to care or notice.

 

And, should one of the main powder kegs blow, the rest of the system will blow too, leaving the world to struggle again from the beginning, as a result of the stupidity and vanity of the current set of inbred elites.

 

Think about it.

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Factories burnt in Vietnam-China row

Factories burnt in Vietnam-China row | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Several factories are set on fire amid anti-China protests at an industrial park in southern Vietnam, amid tensions over the South China Sea.
Eli Levine's insight:

That's one way to fight a war.

 

I don't think China is going to do anything about this other than to press on with the construction of their rig (which may end up being moot, if the Vietnamese are going to keep harassing it and the Chinese factories in Vietnam.

 

Thus we see yet another instance of how a little country is able to successfully repel a significantly larger country, if it makes its priorities good and carries out effective action.  The most effective way to disrupt an occupying country is to hit it in the coin purse.  And, I think the Vietnamese know this very well, owing to their long history of playing cat and mouse with the Chinese (with Vietnam being the mouse and China being the cat).

 

Not the wisest of moves that the Chinese could have done.  Better to abide by international standards and not be excessively greedy.  It's not like they want for resources, and it's not like they can't get the resources they don't have through trade, like everyone else.

 

Foolish leadership.

 

Think about it.

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Democracy at Risk: How Voters in the 2014 Elections in India were Manipulated by Biased Search Rankings

Democracy at Risk: How Voters in the 2014 Elections in India were Manipulated by Biased Search Rankings | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it

Below are data collected between April 2nd and May 12th, 2014, in an experiment conducted by a nonprofit, nonpartisan research institute in Vista, California, USA (see http://AIBRT.org). In the experiment, researchers deliberately manipulated the voting preferences of undecided voters in the national Lok Sabha election in India, the largest democratic election in history, with over 800 million eligible voters.

They did this by randomly assigning undecided voters who had not yet voted (recruited through print advertisements, online advertisements, and online subject pools) to one of three groups in which search rankings favoured either Mr Gandhi, Mr Kejriwal, or Mr Modi. About 2,000 eligible voters from 26 of India's 28 states (age range 18 to 70, mean age 29.5) participated in the study - not enough to affect the election's outcome. People’s preferences were also pushed equally toward all three candidates, so there was no overall bias in the study.

(...)


Via NESS
Eli Levine's insight:

We don't really live in democracies, per se, but simply in oligarchies that may or may not be more or less accountable to the general will of the people.  This goes from dictatorial Russia to liberty "loving" America.

 

Yes, voting patterns can easily be manipulated towards negative ends.  That's not going to change within our species, nor is it likely to alter courses of action that politicians take to get elected to positions of power, consequence and authority.

 

This being said, a government's members cannot hide when they're doing a poorly intended and poorly executed job of governing.  It leaks out and, when there isn't change brought about through democratic (little "d") methods, the population is more likely to turn to violence to get what they need and want.  This is the repeated case thoroughout history, feel free to dbouble check.  Therefore, it is in the government members' interests to either abide by the laws and natural social sentiments o the general public and to forget or eliminate all private entities which may be medling or interfering with thaose democratic processes.  In the long run, it doesn't pay to be a parasitic politician (which means it doesn't pay in the short run as well).  The idea for them is to meld with the public and to learn about them and be actually working for their behalf (which means knowing when to step back and let the "noise" take over, so that you actually get more of the behavior and results that you want, rather then stymying development, growth and well being.)

 

Society, the economy and the environment are  all highly complex systems which we're just beginning to understand and work with.  Better to be humble relative to the other, listen for what's happening amongst all aspects of it and go for your (limited) goals as hard as you can for your own sake as an administrator or as a lowly Federal, State or local emplyee.

 

Think about it.

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Swiss reject highest minimum wage

Swiss reject highest minimum wage | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Swiss voters have rejected a proposal to introduce what would be the highest minimum wage in the world in a referendum, near complete results indicate.
Eli Levine's insight:

Well, I would say to this that perhaps it would be better for the cities who have the highest costs of living introduce a high minimum wage? 

 

At least engage in some sort of profit sharing scheme, such that workers are being paid what they're actually worth in the market.

 

I agree that there should be a baseline for what workers are paid that fluctuates with the wealth that is produced in the economy.  However, I also see where a minimum wage can destroy local businesses who do not produce the kind of revenue that large companies make.  I also agree that profit should be something that can increase, but not without having a certain proportion of that wealth kicked back down to the workers who produced it.

 

Complex economics requires complex policy to make it work effectively, such that we're all benefiting.  Simply having a high minimum wage won't necessarily help the smaller companies and it doesn't take into account how productive the workers actually are at their respective companies.  Policy making requires nuance and factoring in everyone and everything into the equation.  I'm personally not happy that the otherwise sensible Left can be so silly when it comes to making policy decisions without having empirical evidence to back it up.

 

The world needs a Left wing bias, because the empirical function of the economy has a progressive bias.  Trouble is, the current representatives of the Left don't seem to understand the nuances and complexity that has to go into making policy.

 

And that, my friends, is why I would support the introduction of computers and brain implants to make policy decisions over human beings.  They can process or enable us to process more information in faster amounts of time to give us more nuanced plans that actually will more than likely work better than what we've been able to come up with with our analog brains.

 

Down with politicos.  Up with the tech!

 

Think about it.

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The Nature of Us and Our Societies (I Think...)

We are just organic automatons, programmed to seek out happiness, sex, food, water, shelter and air.  The universe functions very much like a computer, of which we are only apart of the algorithm that's constantly working towards self-preservation, survival and well being (just as we are).  There are, technically, a few optimal ways to go about achieving well being, happiness and peace of mind in this universe, much like how there are only a few ways to achieve well being, happiness and peace of ecosystem in the world that is around us.

 

The universe functions on the basis of algorithms which each have benefits, drawbacks and only a few optimal ones to fit with each situation and scenario that we could be faced with.  We fail to follow the algorithms for survival and well being in each situation, scenario and set of conditions that we're in, we'll die or not be very well as an individual member of a collective species or as a collective species as a whole.  We can only do what we're able to do in the technical sense, and we have a very limited knowledge of what those limitations and potentials actually are.

 

We can develop the technology to improve our abilities to act algorithmically in this universe in our given societies and in response and recovery efforts to disaster and general conditions.  The universe could very well be just a computer program running in order to gauge what works, what doesn't work in the grand scheme of things.  The parameters, I think, have been set since the start of this particular universe.  It very well could be that there are more universes that interact with this one.  But the fact of the matter is, is that without the base parameters of mathematics and the laws of physics, there would have been no universe as it appears in this present form.

 

In fact, human societies are very much similar to this multiverse theory of the universe, in that the base elements of these societies are all, essentially, the same, except for a few potential differences in brain software, brought on by a mixture of genetics, epi-genetics, experience and environment (social, cultural and ecological) that leads to the production of unique cultures and social laws and perspectives that differ from one another.  They're all essentially the same, at the root of it, but the tiny changes and differences amongst them bring on some of the tremendous differences in culture, perspective, attitude, action, organization and outlook on the world that is around them.  It should be pointed out that many of these things are actually also, the same as well across cultures.  But the social physics is different in each society, even though each of the ones that has been produced and lasted throughout the ages are each and all fit for our present environment and our present knowledge and understanding about ourselves and the world that is us and around us.

 

Can all of this change?  Yes, in short, it can.  Technology changes, as does our knowledge and outlook upon ourselves.  The emperors of China were overthrown when Western notions of societies were introduced into Chinese culture and civilization.  Did it change the essential nature of Chinese culture?  Arguably, no (hence the modern differences in Chinese organization, culture, attitude, outlook and perspective).  But economic conditions and social conditions, combined with new perspectives brought on a tremendous social revolution in China, even though it has (for the most part) reverted back to the highly centralized and autocratic formation that existed under the emperors.

 

Again, social physics is one of those things where there are some base rules within humanity and, quite possibly, amongst all life in the universe(s).  But the rules are open to changes and differences at certain levels and in certain ways.  This is how differences arise amongst societies and cultures and within societies and cultures, starting from the micro-levels of environment, experience, and body-content composition of the initial members of that given society (especially inclusive of the brain itself).

 

We are just a manifestation of the base laws and content of the universe.  We are star stuff, brought on by the laws of physics interacting with the material and energetic contents of this universe.  It makes sense that the laws of societies are similar to those of the universe, simply because we are the universe as well (at least, our own little chunk of it).  Remember, the totality of the universe is likely to be larger than our own self and our own species.  It is important to bear that in mind, if we pursue other planets and avenues of exploration, such that we do no end up reproducing the European/Native American dynamic again.

 

So, just as we change the outcomes when we observe things in quantum mechanics, so too can we change things through observation of our social world and how it actually works.  We don't have to live in squalor with a monkey-ish elite on top of us in the form of either a private or public elite, and those who end up making the big decisions for our societies need not fear or be greedy with their power and influence in order to stay in those positions.  It is a different outlook on leadership, authority and elites for our world.  And it's probably how a lot of changes in outlook and action are going to start taking place within our society at the very least, and amongst all societies in our whole universe at the very most.

 

Think about it.

 

 

Eli Levine's insight:

It's just a hypothesis.  Please take it with a grain of salt.

 

Thank you.

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The intimacy of crowds: crowds aren’t really crazed – they are made of highly co-operative individuals driven to shared interests and goals

The intimacy of crowds: crowds aren’t really crazed – they are made of highly co-operative individuals driven to shared interests and goals | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it

Crowds aren’t really crazed – they are made of highly co-operative individuals driven to shared interests and goals


Via NESS
Eli Levine's insight:

Interesting.

 

We're still only a sub-rational species, in my view of it.  Yet perhaps our emotional side can be more together than I had previously thought.

 

The non-confrontational policing tactics makes perfect sense, for example, since people get angry when police get angry.  I'm shocked that places like NYPD has not taken these laws to heart, or that we haven't decided at top levels to effectively integrate minorities into American society rather than reject them.

 

The story of human rationality seems to be more complicated than I had thought.  Yet we are still far from perfect for the sake of being able to survive and operate effectively in the long term of evolution, as evidenced by our inability to even accept and work with the fact that the climate is changing against our favor and that we need to slow it down and prepare to adapt to it (as one example).

 

Think about it.

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Hamburger-making machine churns out custom burgers at industrial speeds

Hamburger-making machine churns out custom burgers at industrial speeds | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Momentum Machines is developing a hamburger-making machine that churns out made-to-order burgers at industrial speeds.
Eli Levine's insight:
There goes a lot of the jobs that were made in the recovery efforts, following the 2007-08 Financial Crash. Even top level investment and public sector jobs are likely to be taken over by machines in the coming decades and centuries, if nothing deviates from the present course that we're on (bearing in mind, that the slightest changes in deviation in the present second will likely lead to monumental changes in the future. McDonalds is already putting in kiosks to cashier at some of their restaurants in Europe. Don't know how the economy will react to that loss of jobs and income, however little it may be for the individuals earning it. My guess would be that profits will rise, while economic growth and well being stagnates and declines for the sake of a few people's profits. But anyway, the universe is essentially an algorithmic thing that runs on math. The best possible solutions in any category will likely be the same throughout this universe, especially when we think of things in terms of higher level social functions within our species. Welcome to the future of us, unless anything happens to change in the present along the way. Think about it.
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Network of Mayors and local elected officials provide policy recommendations for White House climate efforts

Network of Mayors and local elected officials provide policy recommendations for White House climate efforts | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
The report calls for modernizing federal emergency management and infrastructure programs to help communities better prepare for extreme weather and other

Via june holley
Eli Levine's insight:

Indeed, it would be more effective if these local communities spent time modernizing their own resiliency and response networks, rather than just relying on the Federal government to do everything.  The Feds, for their part, could help coordinate and oversee the locals' efforts.  However, true resiliency is when the little pieces are able to support themselves in their overlapping network clusters, rather than have a top-down command and control system that's inflexible and not aware of local conditions and needs.

 

Think about it.

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India opposition heads for landslide

India opposition heads for landslide | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
The opposition BJP's predicted landslide win in the Indian election is a "people's victory" that will "start a new era" the party's president says.
Eli Levine's insight:

And thus it happens.

 

You neglect the people in favor of corporations and elite interests, you eventually get thrown out.  Doesn't always matter what the other people are offering.  All that seems to matter to the public is that they're well known and different from your own side.

 

If I were Congress, I'd so some serious soul searching.  It was the party that nationalized the banks of India, and yet, it's become this money grubbing entity that favors the rich over its many millions of poor people.  A rising tide clearly does not raise all boats when there is no connection made between the growth that is realized and the compensation that workers receive.  That's just a law of economics that bleeds into the people's perception and willing to work with the present government.

 

Fortunately, the BJP might not govern effectively either on the national scale.  That would be Congress's opportunity to come into power.  But bear in mind, that there are other alternatives to these two parties in India and, indeed, in any society that has an apparent knack for democracy at its rawest form.  A billion people is a hard thing to counter, regardless of how many troops you may have.

 

Think about it.

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A Fool to Do Your Dirty Work?

Anytime complexity increases through evolution, one must ask how selection at the lower level of organization (i.e., the individual cell) doesn't disrupt the integration at higher levels of organization (i.e., a multicellular organism) by favoring selfishness. There are some general evolutionary hypotheses that have been offered to explain why and how multicellularity and the division of labor between somatic and germline cells evolved, as well as the conditions under which these developments would be expected. Clearly, organisms with differentiated cells can experience many fitness advantages, such as the ability to grow larger and exploit novel resources. And along with these advantages come costs, such as the energy and materials that must be allocated towards growth and maintenance, rather than reproduction. However, there are more subtle, but no less important, constraints on an organism's ability to acquire resources, grow, metabolize, and reproduce that might also influence the evolution of cellular differentiation. (...)

 

Chase JM (2014) A Fool to Do Your Dirty Work? PLoS Biol 12(5): e1001859. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1001859


Via Complexity Digest
Eli Levine's insight:

As an organism gets more complex, it seems that the cells become more simple, in and of themselves, and more interconnected to form the vibrant pattern of cells that form a multi-cellular organism.

 

Kind of like how, in a society where the division of labor took root, to eventually form the assembly line concept.  As society became more complex and diversified, it stands to reason that some larger, all guiding logic needs to pervade the social order, such that behavior is corrected according to thes social standards that are set within the given society (enter religion and/or government) to maintain the integrity of the overall whole that is the social organism.

 

Now, perhaps, it is time that all of these social superstructures: religion, government and business leaders, submit to the larger nature that is our natural world, such that we're actually living in harmony with the constantly evolving and dynamic nature, rather than next to or "over" it.  Survival is the name of the game and adaptability with an accurate sensor of reality is how you win it (bearing in mind, that we've all lost against the race against time and will only leave memory imprints behind when we're gone).  No sense in trying to achieve that which canont be achieved without killiing yourself and your population.

 

Think about it.

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Nigeria troops 'fire at commander'

Nigeria troops 'fire at commander' | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Soldiers open fire on their commander in the north-eastern Nigeria, witnesses say, as anger grows over failure to tackle Islamist insurgency.
Eli Levine's insight:

What the Hell is going on in the Nigerian Army?

Who do they hire for commanders?  How does their system of promotion actually work?

 

Seriously, this is going to rock the legitimacy of the State deeper than anything Boko Haram could have done.  A government who can't even protect its own citizens from violent extremists in its home territory who target civilians is not much of a government at all.

 

Should we invest in Nigeria?

I'm not sure.

 

Think about it.

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Climate Change Deemed Growing Security Threat by Military Researchers

Climate Change Deemed Growing Security Threat by Military Researchers | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
The accelerating rate of climate change poses a severe risk to national security and acts as a catalyst for global political conflict, a report published Tuesday said.

Via Willy De Backer
Eli Levine's insight:

If you don't believe the hippies, believe your own people in the military industrial complex. 

 

Sorry conservatives, but, in the grand scheme of the universe, in spite of all the power and control you've managed to accumulate, you're still an inferior grade of organism for survival on this planet, and you all belong in mental institutions for diagnosis and treatment.

 

You're otherwise a danger to yourselves and a danger to others.

 

Think about it.

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Willy De Backer's curator insight, May 14, 3:10 PM

This is not new - the military have been warning for years but who is listening, and more importantly what will be their recommendations? A change of lifestyle? Very unlikely; more likely, more military to secure the rich and powerful.

Larry Glover's curator insight, May 15, 12:35 PM

Climate destabilization has been on the military's radar for years as a growing security threat...still political inaction remains. Question becomes, whose short term interests are served by supporting denial and inaction? 

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Low-wage workers are often trapped, unable to advance

Low-wage workers are often trapped, unable to advance | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it
Low-wage workers know they have to enhance their skills to escape low-wage jobs, but long hours and multiple jobs make skill-building and education nearly impossible, according to a new policy brief released by the Center for Poverty Research at the University of California, Davis.
Eli Levine's insight:

Yep.

 

Such is the life of drudgery that conservative politicians and members of the elite "liberals" condemn people to live for the sake of ideology and ineptness.

 

Why do we listen to such people?  At all?  They've never served our interests, as the general public.  They've mistaken their own self interests as being linked to their personal "selves" at the expense of their larger "self" that includes the rest of human society and the environment.

 

What do these "people" know or care to know about the general public?  What do these people know or care about their actual selves relative to the public and the environment?  Just a bunch of clueless, inbred, upper crust monkeys, barely even aware of their own humanity relative to the rest of humanity.

 

This is nothing more than the Dixie logic of slavery, where you're actually giving less than what people need to survive, let alone, thrive.

 

And I defy ANY politician, supporter or activist to challenge that claim and to challenge the unethical and immoral nature of that slave-holding system.

 

Enjoy.

 

Think about it.

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Mckinsey CEO: Africa Needs $2.6tr Investment in Infrastructure

Mckinsey CEO: Africa Needs $2.6tr Investment in Infrastructure | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it

Via homestrings, Jocelyn Stoller
Eli Levine's insight:

Imagine if a group of private, public and not for profit forces combined to raise this money for INVESTMENT (not aid) in the whole continent of Africa?

 

Imagine if the governments of Africa streamlined their regulations, stamped out the corruption within their systems and generally functioned to produce these infrastructure improvements?

 

Imagine if they hired local workers, compensated them decently by INTERNATIONAL standards and put them to work with training and educational opportunities for afterward?

Imagine what a home grown miracle could happen if this project were to go ahead, thanks to a combination of competant legislation and government function, the accumulation and investment of public and private funds and the training of tens or hundreds of millions of unemployed or underemployed people.

 

That would be helpful for the African economy, African autonomy, African well being and African quality of life.  No more aid, no more hand outs, no more struggling beyond what they ordinarily would have to deal with.

 

Heck, why not improve our own infrastructure here and make it into a 21st century infrastructure set with emphasis on mass transit?  It needs to be maintained and upgraded every once and awhile, after all.  No sense in letting it rot.

 

Yet goodness forbid the government do anything to encourage independent living and empower people, just for the sake of some people's ideological preferences.

 

Think about it.

Imagine if a group of private, public and not for profit forces combined to raise this money for INVESTMENT (not aid) for the whole continent of Africa?

Imagine if the governments of Africa streamlined their regulations, stamped out the corruption within their systems and generally functioned to produce these infrastructure improvements?

 

Imagine if they hired local workers, compensated them decently by INTERNATIONAL standards and put them to work with training and educational opportunities for afterward?

 

Imagine what a home grown miracle could happen if this project were to go ahead, thanks to a combination of competant legislation and government function, the accumulation and investment of public and private funds and the training of tens or hundreds of millions of unemployed or underemployed people.

 

That would be helpful for the African economy, African autonomy, African well being and African quality of life.  No more aid, no more hand outs, no more struggling beyond what they ordinarily would have to deal with.

 

Heck, why not improve our own infrastructure here and make it into a 21st century infrastructure set with emphasis on mass transit?  It needs to be maintained and upgraded every once and awhile, after all.  No sense in letting it rot.

 

Yet goodness forbid the government do anything to encourage independent living and empower people.

 

Think about it.

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homestrings's curator insight, May 14, 10:09 AM

Global Chief Executive Officer, Mckinsey & Company, Dominic Barton, has disclosed that about $2.6 trillion investment was required to bridge Africa’s infrastructure gap, and noted that investors who needed to be relevant should be in Nigeria and other African countries.

Barton’s remarks came just as President of the Dangote Group, Alhaji Aliko Dangote said experience had proven that Nigeria’s business environment is conducive for investment, admonishing Nigerians who prefer investing outside to have a rethink.

Speaking on the theme “Unlocking Job Creating Growth” at the 24th World Economic Forum on Africa (WEFA) in Abuja Thursday, Barton said Africa’s major challenge was infrastructure which would require about $2.6 trillion investment to address.

Barton said addressing the infrastructure problem was driver required for development and inclusive growth, noting that the continent’s resources were far beyond the abundant natural resources.

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Margaret J. Wheatley: Using Emergence to Take Social Innovations to Scale

Margaret J. Wheatley: Using Emergence to Take Social Innovations to Scale | It Comes Undone-Think About It | Scoop.it

Via june holley
Eli Levine's insight:

Very cool.

 

It's not how many you reach, but who you reach.

 

Very cool indeed.

 

Think about it.

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