Teaching Stage 2 About Contributions in the Community
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Firefighters (2012) By Brendan Gallagher & Debbie Gallagher

Firefighters (2012) By Brendan Gallagher & Debbie Gallagher | Teaching Stage 2 About Contributions in the Community | Scoop.it

"This book explores the roles and responsibilities, daily activities, equipment, training and important personal qualities that a firefighter requires to do their job. It is part of a series inspired by people who demonstrate amazing contributions and commitment to our communities and aims to foster respect and understanding for those that help and protect us. Young students are encouraged to think about their own rights and responsibilities, and how they can be an 'everyday hero'."

Amber Gavalas's insight:

Although this children's book (aimed at years 5-8) may be an easier read for children in a stage 2 classroom, it does effectively portray the life of a firefighter as well as building up respect for the men and women who do this brave job. The reason for including this book is that it give a great introduction into firefighters and the contributions they make in the community.

 

Teaching Idea: Teachers can have a guided reading session with their class using this book. During this reading teachers are to ask the class questions  about the book and about what prior knowledge students have about firefighters already. After, the class can together discuss why they believe firefighters are a valuable asset to the community (how do they help?). Teachers should facilitate the discussion by imputing new ideas, as some students may not know the other roles firefighters play in the community like rescuing people in floods, etc. Make it explicit that firefighters are a "paid workers" that positively contribute to the community in many ways. Ask students if they can think of any other paid workers that help the community like firefighters do (don't forget to talk about unpaid workers too!). They are then to compose a short PowerPoint presentation at home about three different 'paid' occupations that contribute to society and one 'unpaid' (e.g. surf lifesavers) to be assessed by the teacher.

 

Link to relevant theory: The reasoning behind having a guided reading session specifically is because "it "enable[s] the teacher to support and guide the students as they work to read the text, to solve any words they don't know, and to focus on the text's meaning" (Winch, 2010, p. 152);. Also, the teacher's questioning of students throughout the reading of the book will enhance students' reading and literacy skills while they gain an understanding of the message of the text; as Winch (2010) states " questioning helps students draw on what they already know" (p. 152). 

 

References:

Gallagher, B., & Gallagher, D. (2012). Firefighters. South Yarra, Vic: Macmillan Education Australia.

 

Winch, G. (2010). Literacy: Reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University.

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Development programs | Australian Red Cross

Development programs | Australian Red Cross | Teaching Stage 2 About Contributions in the Community | Scoop.it

"Australian Red Cross is committed to building healthier and safer communities. Placing people at the heart of our work, we help to create resilient communities and build strong regional Red Cross partners."

Amber Gavalas's insight:

This webpage is from the Red Cross Australia official website. It presents the many areas in the Asia-Pacific region, and Kenya, in which the Australian Red Cross has developmental programs in place to help those in need. These programs range from providing safe drinking water to providing education services and many more in between. There are a list of the different countries where the Red Cross helps that can be clicked on in order to view more information about each one.

 

Teaching Idea: In the classroom this page would be a very valuable resource as is demonstrates a global perspective about how contributions from an organisation and its workers can affect a community in an interactive manner. Teachers could have students research the ways in which the Red Cross aids people in at least three places listed on the site (Kenya, one country in Asia listed, and one country in the Pacific listed). This information could then be used to start group mind maps about the different ways workers and organisations can positively contribute to the global community; these mind maps could be presented to the class.

 

Link to relevant theory: Winch (2010) states “resources available or learning in the digital age are making [teaching] more interactive and more interesting and more relevant for students....Computers present teachers with many opportunities to teach students the skills and knowledge of modern literacy” (p.23); thus this online webpage allows for students to interact with what they are learning in a way that they feel more connected to in this modern technology context, resulting in more engagement and more learning.

 

References:

Australian Red Cross (n.d.). Development programs | Australian Red Cross. Retrieved April 1, 2014, from http://www.redcross.org.au/development-programs.aspx

 

Winch, G. (2010). Literacy: Reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University.

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The Salvation Army - Australia

The Salvation Army - Australia | Teaching Stage 2 About Contributions in the Community | Scoop.it

The official Salvation Army Australia website - "How your donation helps" webpage

Amber Gavalas's insight:

The Salvation Army Australia is a non government organisation that includes both paid and unpaid workers as well as volunteers in order to provide the many services and goods needed for their cause. They aim to supply food, shelter, health services, clothing, and many other services to people in need in Australia.

This webpage taken from their official website highlights some of the contributions the Salvation Army provides to the community. It shows clear facts and figures which demonstrate the major impact they have had throughout Australia.

 

Teaching Idea: In pairs students are to use the Salvation Army website (the page linked above to be used to find majority of information) to gather information about what contributions this organisation has made to the community and why they believe this organisation is beneficial/important. Students are to then go through the information and decide which information they view as most important (student discretion is to be used) to then create a short PowerPoint in pairs also (no more than five slides). This PowerPoint will be handed into the teacher for assessment.

 

Links to relevant theory: Olssen (2004) conveys the notion that ICT changes the dynamic of a classroom in a positive manner, making it more interactive and engaging if used professionally (p. 165). This means that by utilising the internet/websites, such as this one, in an educational manner in the classroom teachers can attempt to bridge the gap between what is relevant to students and what needs to be learnt; resulting in more interested students and, hopefully, better information retention rates

 

References:

Olssen, M. (2004). Culture and learning: Access and opportunity in the classroom. Greenwich, USA: IAP.

 

The Salvation Army (n.d.). How Your Donation Helps » Donate » salvos.org.au. Retrieved March 31, 2014, from http://salvos.org.au/donate/how-your-donation-helps/

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Australian Red Cross - YouTube

Everyday we work with the most vulnerable people and communities here in Australia and further afield. For more information, visit http://bit.ly/15koi9k.
Amber Gavalas's insight:

This short video found on YouTube made by the Australian Red Cross briefly introduces the many areas of work and aid the organisation and both its paid and unpaid workers provides. We can see that the Australian Red Cross has eight main areas of concern: International aid and development, International humanitarian law, Emergency services, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander programs, Social inclusion, Community strengthening programs, Blood donation, and Migration Support.

 

Teaching Idea: Using this video alongside the website of the Australian Red Cross the class can do research into what services the Australian Red Cross provides. After watching the video and having a brief class discussion about each of the eight areas of work mentioned in the video, getting students prior knowledge about these issues, students can then do further research individually into one of these eight areas they desire using the Australian Red Cross' website (found at: http://www.redcross.org.au/how-we-help.aspx). They are to answer questions regarding the positive effects the Red Cross has had in their chosen area of concern as well as discuss why they feel the organisation is has made positive contributions in the wider community.

 

Link to relevant theory: It can be said that "the effectiveness or quality of direct instruction can be greatly improved by the use of technology" (Moore & Hansen, 2012, p. 183); thus this resource allows for the teacher's more direct teaching strategies highlighting the Australian Red Cross' contributions to become more engaging for students and in turn generate deeper learning.

 

References:

Australian Red Cross (2012, July 14). Australian Red Cross [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47LzVLzvJdY

 

Australian Red Cross (n.d.). How we help | Australian Red Cross. Retrieved April 2, 2014, from http://www.redcross.org.au/how-we-help.aspx

 

Moore, K. D., & Hansen, J. R. (2012). Effective strategies for teaching in K-8 classrooms. Thousand Oaks: SAGE Publications.

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Salvation Army Newsletter

2007 newsletter written and published by the Salvation Army Australia. Page 3 is the specific page needed from this resource

Amber Gavalas's insight:

This newsletter (p. 3)  includes an article about 13 year old Jess from the predominantly Indigenous town of Moree in NSW. Moree is one of the areas in Australia that the Salvation Army targets in their Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander program. They provide donations from volunteers and providing many health/education services from paid and unpaid workers to those in need. The article shows the perspective of one of these people (Jess) on how the Salvation Army has positively contributed towards her personal life aspirations as well as her community.


Teaching Idea: This article could be used in a classroom to effectively integrate and present an Indigenous perspective on this topic. Students would be able to utilise this article in order to answer comprehension and short answer questions the teacher has given about the article itself. These questions should reflect the nature of the article and topic and aid students' understanding of how unpaid and paid workers and voluntary organisations can contribute to the community, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous.

 

Link to relevant theory: It is known that teachers are responsible for trying to utilise both new technologies and more traditional methods in their teaching strategies in order to try and give their student's the best, all-rounded, learning experiences possible. Thus Winch (2010) states that “the teacher needs to look at ways in which the emerging technologies can blend with traditional methods to enhance students’...learning” (p.400).  Online articles/newsletters like this one are a perfect example of just that; merging new digital resources with traditional common texts. The use of this specific page/article is best supported by Steven's (2005) model of ways in which we can embed Indigenous perspectives in education. It demonstrates that one of the ways is on a curriculum level, "where resources reflecting Indigenous perspectives are evident" (as cited in Gilbert & Hoepper, 2010, p. 388). By having this article showing the experience of an Indigenous child, using her direct quotes and opinions, the teacher will be able to present an Indigenous perspective to their students in an integrated and seamless manner.

 

References:

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2010). Teaching society and environment. South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.

 

Stevens, V. (2005). Embedding Indigenous perspectives model framework. Unpublished Model Framework , Indigenous Intellectual Property [PowerPoint].

 

The Salvation Army (2007). On the scene. Retrieved from http://salvos.org.au/about-us/news-and-resources/documents/991-SAL-OTSS0762web.pdf

 

Winch, G. (2010). Literacy: Reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University.

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