Continuing and changing roles, traditions, practices and customs in the local community
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NRW | Resources

NRW | Resources | Continuing and changing roles, traditions, practices and customs in the local community | Scoop.it
Joycelyn Lee's insight:

 

This resource is great for teachers and the whole school to use to celebrate and discuss the continuing practice of ‘National Reconciliation Week’. This website can be seen as an Indigenous perspective because it allows teachers to look at the many different views on how people throughout the community celebrate this week, with diverse fact-sheets involving how this week came to be a practice within our communities. This link below gives teachers and schools stage appropriate activities to do within the classroom and throughout the whole school community.

http://www.reconciliation.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/NRW-Teaching-and-Learning-Ideas.pdf

 

Teaching Idea: Teachers are to have a class discussion on what they think reconciliation means to the whole class. They are to create a class book about NRW. Every student must write (about 2 paragraphs depending on class) on an A4 page (folded in half horizontally) about what reconciliation means to them. They will have to write on one side of the folded paper and leave the other side to paste their drawing or painting. Scaffolding for the students is great way to help students who may get stuck about the topic or question or may be an EALD student. Help students by scaffolding the sentences out for them. Students will receive another A5 sheet where they will draw or paint, in a landscape view, what they think ‘National Reconciliation Week’ looks like to them. When their interpretation is done they are to stick it on their writing page on the other half of the folded paper. Once students have finished their work and each piece of their work has their name on it, the teacher gathers it together. Use a hole puncher to create a place to tie a ribbon through. You can use representing colours of the Aboriginal flag or the Torres Strait Islander flag. The title can be named “What does reconciliation mean to (insert class name)”. This can be placed within their classroom and so students can have a look at their work and their class’s work.

 

This teaching idea is great to use with students in stage 2 because of the literacy strategy that is involved. Students must use their understanding of the topic and refer it back to what they think reconciliation means to them. According to Ljungdahl and March (2010) “Writing… can collect and store ideas that arise form reflection and talk” (p. 263). This is appropriate to the activity because students are reflecting on the information they have just learnt by creating a book relevant to the topic.

 

Reference:

 

Ljungdahl, L and March, P. (2010). The importance of Writing in our Society. In G. Winch et al (4th Ed.), Literacy: reading, writing and children’s literature (pp. 257-270). Victoria, Australia: Oxford University Press.

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Australia Day History - Australia Day

Australia Day History - Australia Day | Continuing and changing roles, traditions, practices and customs in the local community | Scoop.it

Australia is a natural wonderland of beautiful beaches, crystal blue waters, amazing ancient rock formations and pristine rainforests. Occupying an entire continent of some 7.6 million square kilometres, Australia is the sixth largest country in the world. Our ocean territory is the world’s third largest, spanning three oceans and covering around 12 million square kilometres.

Joycelyn Lee's insight:

 

This resource is great for teachers to teach stage 2 students about the continuing and changing customs and practices of one of Australia Day in the local communities. This site gives teachers an insight of the history behind Australia Day with information dating back to the 1700s when settlers from Britain arrived on the shores of Australia. It not only gives insight through the British settler’s perspective but also acknowledges the mourning of a day where Indigenous Australians lives changed dramatically.

 

Teaching Idea: This task can be done through a UOW of 3 weeks. After researching, investigating, and having long class discussions using the IWB, students are to create a timeline collage of how Australia Day was celebrated or mourned throughout the history of Australia. This can be achieved by teachers having a class discussion about how Australians celebrate Australia Day now to how they celebrated it in the past. This can be saved via the IWB when discussions are done throughout the weeks. On the last week of the UOW, students are given numbers 1 to 4. Students with number 1 will receive 1788-1888; students with number 2 will receive 1889-1938 and so forth with the other students receiving the last two sections of the timeline. Students who are number 4s have to get a piece of butcher paper (large enough for 4 people). They are then to create a group where there must be a student from every number. Each student must draw their own interpretation of how Australia day looked like in their history timeline and describe in two sentences how their drawing relates back to how Australians and Indigenous Australians celebrated Australia Day throughout their history and how they themselves celebrate Australia Day. Students then represent their work to the class, to which the other students must give appropriate constructive feedback via a scaffolding sheet given from the teacher.

 

This teaching idea is a great way for students to understand the importance of comparing and contrasting history to a ‘then and now’ perspective. This activity can help them to reflect on their work and helps them to understand the importance of giving constructive feedback to other peers. According to Gilbert (2011), allowing students to participate in “assessment practice gives students a positive and guided way of showing how important their work and other students work are (p. 135). If students have that responsibility of giving other students feedback on their work, it will give them a sense of importance to their own work and presentation.

 

Reference:

 

Gilbert, R. (2011). Assessment for student learning. In R. Gilbert and B. Hoepper (4th Ed.), Teaching Society and Environment (pp. 122-140). Victoria, Australia: Cengage Learning Australia Pty Limited.

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The Anzac Day tradition | Australian War Memorial

The Anzac Day tradition | Australian War Memorial | Continuing and changing roles, traditions, practices and customs in the local community | Scoop.it
Joycelyn Lee's insight:

 

This resource allows teachers to teach students in stage 2 to learn the history and long tradition of commemorations to the fallen soldiers of WWI. Within this resource teachers can gather information about ‘What is ANZAC Day?’, ‘What does ANZAC stand for?’, ‘Why is this day special to Australians?’, ‘The Dawn Service’ and ‘What does it mean today?’ just to name a few. These points give insightful information about the way Australians and other nationalities in Australia honour and celebrate this day.

 

Teaching idea: Teachers can use this site to start a discussion on why we as Australian’s and other nationalities, who were involved in WWI, honour and celebrate this day. This can be done in the lead up to ANZAC Day. Students will, with the information given, make a paper poppy flower to honour and celebrate this day. This poppy flower will have a message that the students will write for the fallen soldiers of WWI. These poppy flowers can be made by having black laminate paper as the base, while using black, green and red coloured crepe paper to represent the poppy. Students are then to make the stem 3D, by folding or rolling the green crepe paper. Using PVA glue to stick on the crepe paper will suffice. Students will receive a template of the flower petals from the teacher and they will have to cut out appropriate sizes for the petals. Once they have cut around 10 flower petals they can stick them on accordingly. Teachers, make sure to make one before you do the activity with you students, so they can see a finished example of what it needs to look like (be creative). To create the black inside the poppy get students to scrunch up an appropriate sized crepe paper then glue in the middle of their poppy flower. Once dried, give students a white permanent marker so they can write their message to the fallen soldiers of WWI. Their message could be ‘Lest We Forget’ or ‘Thank you to all the fallen Soldiers of ANZAC for representing our country’. This can then be taken with them when they either go to an ANZAC Day ceremony or a Dawn Service which is held at an RSL or at a war memorial.

Teachers can also use this resource in use with the other poppy making activity:

http://www.kidspot.com.au/kids-activities-and-games/Paper-craft+39/Make-a-red-poppy+12865.htm

 

Reference:

 

Kidspot, (2013). Make a Red Poppy. Kidspot. Retrieved from http://www.kidspot.com.au/kids-activities-and-games/Paper-craft+39/Make-a-red-poppy+12865.htm

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Chinese New Year Video - Chinese New Year - HISTORY.com

Chinese New Year Video - Chinese New Year - HISTORY.com | Continuing and changing roles, traditions, practices and customs in the local community | Scoop.it

The 15-day long Chinese New Year celebration originated from an ancient Chinese legend of the monster Nian.

Joycelyn Lee's insight:

 

This video is great for students in stage 2 and teachers, due to the simplicity in its information given throughout the video. This video gives viewers knowledge of the worldwide tradition and customs of the Chinese New Year, or known by other names such as ‘the Lunar New Year’ and ‘the Spring Festival’. This video shows us how Chinese people within China, celebrate this festive holiday. It shows what they do throughout the 15 day festival for example what symbols they believe in, what food they eat, what they do on particular days and how they celebrate with family. This resource can be looked at through global perspective because of the world-wide tradition brought from Chinese migrants moving to other countries.

 

Teaching Idea: Students are given four way table to which it would have 4 different countries that celebrate Chinese New Year. This activity looks to give students a chance to learn about the differences and similarities Chinese people, living all around the world, and other people who wan to be a part of Chinese New year make it happen. Students will be given a number from 1 to 4. The students that have number one will look at China and how Chinese celebrate this tradition, students receiving number 2 will get Australia and number 3 and 4 will get America and the UK. Students will research their given countries and take down notes, which would be scaffolded by the teacher, to find factual and relevant information. This activity can happen throughout the week and at the end of the week students are to break off to create a new group where they will be the expert and have to explain their country to other people who have other countries. Students then can fill out the rest of the table with information given to them by other students.

 

This activity allows for students to have a wider understanding because of the thinking strategy of comparing and contrasting one tradition that is celebrated every year world-wide. Using the idea of a table allows them to see the differences and similarities countries celebrate Chinese New Year. Students are reflecting on their prior knowledge and finding new ones which help them to see the wider view of comparing and contrasting (McDonald and Gilbert, 2011, p. 104).

 

Reference:

 

McDonald, H. and Gilbert, R. (2011). Planning for student learning. In R. Gilbert and B. Hoepper (4th Ed.), Teaching Society and Environment (pp. 99-121). Victoria, Australia: Cengage Learning Australia Pty Limited.

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Dean Dray's curator insight, August 13, 2014 9:04 AM

HSIE resource created by a friend from Uni

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Christmas season celebrations in Australia | australia.gov.au

Christmas season celebrations in Australia | australia.gov.au | Continuing and changing roles, traditions, practices and customs in the local community | Scoop.it
Joycelyn Lee's insight:

 

What is your family tradition on Christmas Day? This resource is great for teachers because of the vast information that is provided, such as ‘what happens on Christmas Day in the Southern Hemisphere’ (Australia), and other continuing traditions that happen differently in every child’s home for example, putting up of the Christmas tree on the 1st of December.

 

Teaching idea for stage 2 students: This resource can be used as a spark in a class discussion on how Australia as a whole celebrate Christmas compared to how students spend their time on the lead up to Christmas Day. Students must give an example of at least one traditional activity they do, who they do it with and how they do this particular activity. This Discussion can be done 2 weeks prior to the students leaving school for their long school holiday break. Students can then go home and ask their parents how they spent their lead up to Christmas Day when they were younger. They must record the information they have gathered to write a report on the changes of how Christmas Day for their parents were spent or the lead up to Christmas Day, compared to how students spent this day.

 

This teaching idea is a great way to allow students to see how their parents spent their time on Christmas day when they were younger. Students will be able to compare the similarities of what the parents did, whether they continued with their own family’s traditions or whether they had completely changed it to suit their lifestyles. This compare and contrast activity is a great tool to allow the HSIE K-6 Syllabus outcome CCS2.2 to come into effect because of the changes through individuals and family life (BOS, 2007).

 

Reference:

 

Board of Studies, (2007). Syllabus: Human Society and Its Environment. Sydney, Australia NSW.

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