Contextual medicine
Follow
Find
165 views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Leonard Kish
onto Contextual medicine
Scoop.it!

The Future of Healthcare IT and Google Glass - Healthcare IT ConnectHealthcare IT Connect

The Future of Healthcare IT and Google Glass - Healthcare IT ConnectHealthcare IT Connect | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it
Google Glass, the much-anticipated new Android OS platform is not yet widely available, but health IT professional are already bussing about it.
Leonard Kish's insight:

Can't say much until I try these, but the possiblities are interesting. Still, I think I'd rather stay at home for most things and have the glass be the video chat.

more...
No comment yet.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Leonard Kish from Health, eHealth, mHealth, Health & Social Media, Digital Health, Telehealth, Quantified Self, Wearable Tech
Scoop.it!

A Google Glass App For Doctors To Stream Video Of Patients To Consult Other Doctors

A Google Glass App For Doctors To Stream Video Of Patients To Consult Other Doctors | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it
Noor Siddiqui is only 19, but she's already designed a way for new technology to help improve health.

Via Celine Sportisse
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Leonard Kish
Scoop.it!

How highly sensitive, wearable thermometers could change digital health | mobihealthnews

How highly sensitive, wearable thermometers could change digital health | mobihealthnews | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Leonard Kish
Scoop.it!

How Would You Have Died in 1811? Play Our Grisly Game and Find Out.

How Would You Have Died in 1811? Play Our Grisly Game and Find Out. | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it
The main reason life was so different 100, 200, or 300 years ago than it is today is that death was so different. People died young—in infancy or childhood, mostly—and they died miserably of communicable diseases.
Leonard Kish's insight:

I'm pretty sure that without antibiotics, I would have died of strep/scarlet fever as a child 100 years ago. Let's all take a moment to be thankfule for hwo far we've come.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Leonard Kish
Scoop.it!

Dr. Eric Topol Talks Treating Patients in a Digital Era

Dr. Eric Topol Talks Treating Patients in a Digital Era | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it
Video featuring Dr. Eric Topol, Scripps Health Chief Academic Officer talks treating patients in a digital era at the recent Qualcomm Life Summit 2013.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Leonard Kish
Scoop.it!

Augmented Reality in Operating Rooms Soon!

Augmented Reality in Operating Rooms Soon! | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it
A clinic in Germany started experimenting with an application using augmented reality on iPads in the OR. During operations, surgeons can see through anatomical structures such as blood vessels in ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leonard Kish from Ben chodor
Scoop.it!

Why pharma must embrace digital health | Pharma Daily - Latest Pharma News!

Why pharma must embrace digital health | Pharma Daily - Latest Pharma News! | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it

Digital health is on fire these days.By every measure, from venture capital dollars to new apps to payer digital health init (RT @Pharma_Daily: Why pharma must embrace digital health http://t.co/Izp33Obkbb ...


Via Ben Chodor
more...
Ben Chodor's curator insight, August 25, 2013 9:46 AM
Check this out - and pharma has to embrace it!
Rescooped by Leonard Kish from Patient
Scoop.it!

Tooth sensor tracks eating, drinking, smoking habits with 93.8% accuracy

Tooth sensor tracks eating, drinking, smoking habits with 93.8% accuracy | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it
A small tooth sensor could revolutionize the way you keep track of your diet, as all the tracker's data will back up to your smartphone.

Via Andrew Spong
Leonard Kish's insight:

This is an huge development in the future of health care. One of the biggest problems with health is that we generally have no idea what or how much we are consuming. This is big.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Leonard Kish
Scoop.it!

The Future of Healthcare IT and Google Glass - Healthcare IT ConnectHealthcare IT Connect

The Future of Healthcare IT and Google Glass - Healthcare IT ConnectHealthcare IT Connect | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it
Google Glass, the much-anticipated new Android OS platform is not yet widely available, but health IT professional are already bussing about it.
Leonard Kish's insight:

Can't say much until I try these, but the possiblities are interesting. Still, I think I'd rather stay at home for most things and have the glass be the video chat.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leonard Kish from mHealth: Patient Centered Care-Clinical Tools-Targeting Chronic Diseases
Scoop.it!

Emerging mHealth: Paths for Growth

Emerging mHealth: Paths for Growth | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it
mHealth expectations are high, but perspectives differ between patients, doctors and payors, and adoption differs between developed and emerging nations.

Via ET Russell
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leonard Kish from Health promotion. Social marketing
Scoop.it!

Participatory Design in Healthcare: Patients and doctors can bridge critical information gaps | UX Magazine

Participatory Design in Healthcare: Patients and doctors can bridge critical information gaps | UX Magazine | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it

Born in Scandinavia in the mid-1960s under the moniker "cooperative design," what we now call participatory design went through a number of changes, and can be seen influencing urban design, architecture, community planning, and placemaking, as well as landscape design, product design, sustainability, graphic design, software design, and healthcare. The combination of the last two elements is the subject of this article.


Via Giuseppe Fattori
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leonard Kish from Contextual medicine
Scoop.it!

The Rise of Contextual Medicine by @leonardkish

The Rise of Contextual Medicine by @leonardkish | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it
Author Leonard Kish explains how patient narratives and health information in context may be the gravitational force that pulls patients toward their goals.

Via Chad Johnson, Leonard Kish
Leonard Kish's insight:

My latest, how will health information embrace us?

more...
Chad Johnson's curator insight, March 22, 2013 10:58 AM

Fantastic article on how where you're at often defines the lens through which we view different events or happenings in our lives. Changing care to treat patients in the appropriate context has great potential.

Scooped by Leonard Kish
Scoop.it!

School is a prison — and damaging our kids

School is a prison — and damaging our kids | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it
Longer school years aren't the answer. The problem is school itself. Compulsory teach-and-test simply doesn't work
Leonard Kish's insight:

Jonathan Doerr says that healthcare and education are the two biggest opportunities right now, and both are undergoing, i think, a push (actually a pull) toward self-direction.  "Most said that a major benefit of their Sudbury Valley education was that they had acquired a sense of personal responsibility and capacity for self-control that served them well in all aspects of their lives."

 

Personal responsibility for health care is something that may become a big part of both healthcare and education.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Leonard Kish
Scoop.it!

Access to Your Device Data? That'll be $797. | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers

Access to Your Device Data? That'll be $797. | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it
E-patient advocate Hugo Campos has found another landmine as he navigates the course for full access to his implantable cardiac device data from his implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD)  – the clandestine world of medical billing.
Leonard Kish's insight:

Are device makers missing out on the opportunity of the decade, to become hubs rather than spokes?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leonard Kish from #HITsm
Scoop.it!

Inpatient, Outpatient: It's About Responsibility, Not Location, by @LeonardKish

Inpatient, Outpatient: It's About Responsibility, Not Location, by @LeonardKish | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it
Healthcare should begin planning for the new normal, where care will be provided more often outside the hospital's four walls.

Via Chad Johnson
Leonard Kish's insight:

More on the new normal.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Leonard Kish
Scoop.it!

All the decisions are made somewhere else: observations made while working in the hospital

All the decisions are made somewhere else: observations made while working in the hospital | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it
Most of the time I take care of patients in the clinic, but I regularly admit patients to the hospital as well. I try and notice what makes me uncomfortable when I see them there. (Which is probably...
Leonard Kish's insight:

Meanwhile, all decision made at home are made by patient. Needs to be a better mix, and scalable decision-making.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leonard Kish from Ben chodor
Scoop.it!

Record growth in Bluetooth Smart devices announced - M2M Now

Record growth in Bluetooth Smart devices announced - M2M Now | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it

Record growth in Bluetooth Smart devices announced - M2M Now – Global machine to machine news and expert opinions on the M2M industry


Via Ben Chodor
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Leonard Kish
Scoop.it!

5 Questions for Dr. Steven Davidson, CMIO of Maimonides

5 Questions for Dr. Steven Davidson, CMIO of Maimonides | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it
Dr. Steven Davidson, chief medical informatics officer at Maimonides Medical Center and practicing emergency room physician, is a self-proclaimed “physician-executive geek.” But he’s not interested in jumping on every new technology brought to...
Leonard Kish's insight:

Been a fan of Dr. Davidson for a long time. Here's an interview that shows why.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Leonard Kish
Scoop.it!

Doctors who skip social media risk alienating patients - amednews.com

Doctors who skip social media risk alienating patients - amednews.com | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it
As more patients share information online, practices can benefit from establishing a presence and providing patients with digital communication options.
Leonard Kish's insight:

"Nearly a quarter of patients reported in a 2012 survey by consulting firm PwC that they are using social media to manage their health care, said John Edwards, PwC’s director of health care strategy and health care business intelligence. PwC surveyed more than 1,000 consumers and 124 health care executives.

Edwards said many patients are interested in making appointments online, receiving appointment reminders through texts and interacting with physician practices through secure emailing options.

DID YOU KNOW:
25% of Americans use social media to manage their health care.

Patients in the survey said they used social media to talk about their health care with others. Twenty-four percent said they posted about their medical experiences, and 27% said they posted reviews about medications, treatments, doctors or health insurers."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Leonard Kish
Scoop.it!

The Data Revolution In Health IT #MITIQ | SiliconANGLE

The Data Revolution In Health IT #MITIQ | SiliconANGLE | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it
Leonard Kish's insight:

Great interview about, particularly Farzad's comments on using data to understand every encounter and build upon medical knowledge. Strong vision.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leonard Kish from :: The 4th Era ::
Scoop.it!

Design Thinking Action Lab | Stanford Online

Design Thinking Action Lab | Stanford Online | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it

FREE COURSE STARTS JULY 22

 

"In this experiential course, Stanford d.school lecturer and Epicenter Deputy Director Leticia Britos Cavagnaro and her team will take you on a journey to learn the design thinking process

 

"All humans are born as creative beings, but as we grow up, school and work offer few opportunities to cultivate and apply our creativity. At Stanford’s Hasso Plattner Institute of Design - known as the d.school - students of all disciplines learn the design thinking process as a methodology for creative and human-centered problem solving that empowers them to collaborate across disciplines and tackle the world’s biggest challenges.

 

 

"In this experiential course - free and open to all - you will learn the design thinking process by tackling a real world innovation challenge. As preparation for each stage of the challenge, you will explore the main design thinking concepts through short videos, each paired with brief activities to practice relevant methods and approaches. There will be one weekly assignment reporting on your progress, as well as weekly Google hangouts with the instructor. On the last week of the course, you will apply the process to your own context and challenges, while hearing from experts who use design thinking to innovate in differents fields, such as healthcare and education."


Via Jim Lerman
Leonard Kish's insight:

I might have to take this! Thanks for sharing! Design thinking is about defining context.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leonard Kish from #HITsm
Scoop.it!

5 Questions With Grahame Grieve, Original Architect of HL7 FHIR

5 Questions With Grahame Grieve, Original Architect of HL7 FHIR | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it
Learn more on this exciting new standard poised to advance interoperability in healthcare.

Via Chad Johnson
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leonard Kish from #HITsm
Scoop.it!

The Rise of Contextual Medicine by @leonardkish

The Rise of Contextual Medicine by @leonardkish | Contextual medicine | Scoop.it
Author Leonard Kish explains how patient narratives and health information in context may be the gravitational force that pulls patients toward their goals.

Via Chad Johnson
more...
Chad Johnson's curator insight, March 22, 2013 10:58 AM

Fantastic article on how where you're at often defines the lens through which we view different events or happenings in our lives. Changing care to treat patients in the appropriate context has great potential.

Leonard Kish's curator insight, March 22, 2013 11:35 AM

My latest, how will health information embrace us?