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Rescooped by Johann René Ebert from The MarTech Digest
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2014 Marketing Trends You Probably Haven't Heard - Forbes | #TheMarketingTechAlert

2014 Marketing Trends You Probably Haven't Heard - Forbes | #TheMarketingTechAlert | Content Marketing | Scoop.it

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1.  Business Model Disruption Will Get Spikier: All the changing technology and democratization of advantages typically held only by large companies generates some real doozy business model disruptions in 2014. 

2. Squeeze the Marketing Cost Balloon: Spiking costs from all that content, personalization, marketing technology spend and global campaigning is really cramping your style with the CFO.  Quick: CMO vs. CFO, who wins?   Sooooo…many CMOs will be taking drastic measures to manage marketing costs in 2014. 

3. Head or Tail of Content Distribution—Pick One!!!  A funny thing happens when content is digitized and anyone can create it and distribute it.  Players in the middle get crushed.

4.  Digital Immigrants Eye the Grand Canyon, Planning for the Leap

5. Somebody Will Create a Hype Game about Gamification

6. Smart Brands Will Formalize Change Pre-Viz Teams:  “Huh?” you say.  Pre-viz is short for “pre-visualization”.  Think of this as creating immersive prototypes of what the new world will look like once a change happens (or a new product or service hits).

7. Bot Traffic Becomes 135% of all Internet Traffic:  I jest (it’s actually 62% now).  But 2014 will continue to unveil just how much digital traffic isn’t really people traffic, per se. 

8. Some Brands Will Call a Tech Timeout:  Others will wish they had.  We’re catching wind of some large enterprise marketing teams calling a timeout on new marketing technology and platforms in 2014. 

9.  Some CIO-CMO Tandems Will Get Down to Brass Tacks

 

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Via marketingIO
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marketingIO's curator insight, January 13, 2014 8:09 PM

Numbers 2 and 8 are interesting, and I wouldn't be surprised to see things slow down so as to catch a breath, organize, then go back at it.

Rescooped by Johann René Ebert from Marketing in Motion
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What is the role of targeting "Social Influencers"?

What is the role of targeting "Social Influencers"? | Content Marketing | Scoop.it

Earlier this year, Forbes published an article entitled Who Are the Top 50 Social Media Power Influencers, 2013? by Haydn Shaughnessy. It followed similar posts by Shaughnessy on The Top 20 Women Social Media Influencers, also on Forbes, and a similar Top 50 list 12 months earlier.

 

The article soon came under fire from certain areas of the web, including Mark Schaefer’s Grow blog and Jure Klepic of the Huffington Post. Additionally, there were numerous conversations across the web on the Forbes article, with the majority of people discounting its validation.

So why did a publication like Forbes receive such criticism, and what does the discounting of influencer results like the one on Forbes mean for influence marketing in general?




Via Russ Merz, Ph.D., Joachim Scholz, PhD
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Joachim Scholz, PhD's comment, December 8, 2013 8:16 AM
Good point, Russ. I am also reminded of an HBR from May 2013: "What would Ashton do - and does it matter?", which discusses that Ashton Kutcher has a massive twitter fanbase, but how many people actually do things because they read it on his feed? There has been also a Journal of Consumer Research article some years back (2010?) that modelled social influence, finding that the Katz and Lazarsfeld Two-Step Flow Model of social influence is flawed: It is not the all-powerful influencer at the center, but consumers are influenced by other easily influenced consumers similar to them. This all goes into the same direction as the conclusion of this article: Be customer centric, not influencer centric.
Joachim Scholz, PhD's curator insight, December 8, 2013 8:20 AM

This blog post reminds me of an HBR from May 2013: "What would Ashton do - and does it matter?", which discusses that Ashton Kutcher has a massive twitter fanbase, but how many people actually do things because they read it on his feed? There has been also a Journal of Consumer Research article some years back (2010?) that modelled social  influence, finding that the Katz and Lazarsfeld Two-Step Flow Model of social influence is flawed: It is not the all-powerful influencer at the center, but consumers are influenced by other easily influenced consumers similar to them.

 

This all goes into the same direction as the conclusion of this article: Be customer centric, not influencer centric:

 

"This is the where the flaws of putting today’s definition of an influencer at the heart of the marketing circle appear; and why we need to move beyond this, and start putting the actual customer at the heart of the circle, and work back from there.


By taking this approach, we understand who the true influencers are – customers – and what they’re looking for, as well as who’s influencing their decisions at a specific point in time."

Tannah Gravelis's curator insight, August 22, 2014 2:16 AM

This article is an interesting perspective into social influencers, and how exactly to measure the 'influence' of an individual. it raises the interesting point that popularity doesn't equate to influence, which is something that marketers and wannabe social influencers are still trying to finesse. This article is an interesting insight into another angle of looking at the social influencer phenomenon

 

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