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Content in Context
Content in Context
The making of citizen librarian in progress
Curated by Jesse Soininen
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The Next Phase of Social Business is the Collaborative Economy says Jeremiah Owyang of Altimeter

The Next Phase of Social Business is the Collaborative Economy says Jeremiah Owyang of Altimeter | Content in Context | Scoop.it
Jesse Soininen's insight:

The roles of economy as we know them now are slowly shifting. Ultimately the power of being co-creator (formerly known as the "customer") will have much lager effect than most of us are willing to anticipate now.

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Catherine Pascal's curator insight, March 2, 10:46 AM

Very interesting . Thanks !

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Airbnb CEO spells out the end game for the sharing economy, in 7 quotes

Airbnb CEO spells out the end game for the sharing economy, in 7 quotes | Content in Context | Scoop.it
“ Brian Chesky, wants a world more like the villages of old: highly trusting and filled with micro-entrepreneurs who shared their assets to make a living.”
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The structure and dynamics of multilayer networks

In the past years, network theory has successfully characterized the interaction among the constituents of a variety of complex systems, ranging from biological to technological, and social systems. However, up until recently, attention was almost exclusively given to networks in which all components were treated on equivalent footing, while neglecting all the extra information about the temporal- or context-related properties of the interactions under study. Only in the last years, taking advantage of the enhanced resolution in real data sets, network scientists have directed their interest to the multiplex character of real-world systems, and explicitly considered the time-varying and multilayer nature of networks. We offer here a comprehensive review on both structural and dynamical organization of graphs made of diverse relationships (layers) between its constituents, and cover several relevant issues, from a full redefinition of the basic structural measures, to understanding how the multilayer nature of the network affects processes and dynamics.The structure and dynamics of multilayer networksS. Boccaletti, G. Bianconi, R. Criado, C.I. del Genio, J. Gómez-Gardeñes, M. Romance, I. Sendiña-Nadal, Z. Wang, M. Zaninhttp://arxiv.org/abs/1407.0742
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Singularity 1 on 1: Jeremy Rifkin on the Zero Marginal Cost Society and the Decline of Capitalism

Singularity 1 on 1: Jeremy Rifkin on the Zero Marginal Cost Society and the Decline of Capitalism | Content in Context | Scoop.it
“ A one-of-a-kind conversation with Jeremy Rifkin discussing “The Zero Marginal Cost Society” and the decline of capitalism.”
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Spaceweaver's curator insight, June 30, 8:30 AM

Interesting and a must read...

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Theoretical physics: The origins of space and time

Theoretical physics: The origins of space and time | Content in Context | Scoop.it
Many researchers believe that physics will not be complete until it can explain not just the behavior of space and time, but where these entities come from.“Imagine waking up one day and realizing that you actually live inside a computer game,” says Mark Van Raamsdonk, describing what sounds like a pitch for a science-fiction film. But for Van Raamsdonk, a physicist at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, this scenario is a way to think about reality. If it is true, he says, “everything around us — the whole three-dimensional physical world — is an illusion born from information encoded elsewhere, on a two-dimensional chip”. That would make our Universe, with its three spatial dimensions, a kind of hologram, projected from a substrate that exists only in lower dimensions.This 'holographic principle' is strange even by the usual standards of theoretical physics. But Van Raamsdonk is one of a small band of researchers who think that the usual ideas are not yet strange enough. If nothing else, they say, neither of the two great pillars of modern physics — general relativity, which describes gravity as a curvature of space and time, and quantum mechanics, which governs the atomic realm — gives any account for the existence of space and time. Neither does string theory, which describes elementary threads of energy.Van Raamsdonk and his colleagues are convinced that physics will not be complete until it can explain how space and time emerge from something more fundamental — a project that will require concepts at least as audacious as holography. They argue that such a radical reconceptualization of reality is the only way to explain what happens when the infinitely dense 'singularity' at the core of a black hole distorts the fabric of space-time beyond all recognition, or how researchers can unify atomic-level quantum theory and planet-level general relativity — a project that has resisted theorists' efforts for generations.“All our experiences tell us we shouldn't have two dramatically different conceptions of reality — there must be one huge overarching theory,” says Abhay Ashtekar, a physicist at Pennsylvania State University in University Park.Finding that one huge theory is a daunting challenge. Here, Nature explores some promising lines of attack — as well as some of the emerging ideas about how to test these concepts (see 'The fabric of reality').
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, June 24, 7:52 AM

A recap on the unifying theories that could explain the fabric of our universe.

Tekrighter's curator insight, June 25, 6:36 AM

Gravity as thermodynamics reinforces the idea of gravity as an emergent property of space-time...

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Engaging Employees: 3 Ways To Actually Do It

Engaging Employees: 3 Ways To Actually Do It | Content in Context | Scoop.it
“Start by talking about impact, not financial performance.”
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Richard Lock's curator insight, June 18, 12:06 AM

Good example of the clear benefits of genuine engagement.

Jean-Guy Frenette's curator insight, June 18, 6:33 PM

PDGLead

Wanda McKenzie's curator insight, June 27, 5:42 PM

ENPS is the 3rd one

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A Curated Collection of The Best Search Engines Organized Around Your Needs

A Curated Collection of The Best Search Engines Organized Around Your Needs | Content in Context | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good, R.Conrath, Ed.D.
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Fatima Formariz's curator insight, March 31, 2:41 PM

Refining research by choosing best fitting search engines..

Steve Whitmore's curator insight, June 17, 4:59 AM

Good reference list. I didn't realize there were so many search engines.

Pushpa Kunasegaran's curator insight, June 19, 4:58 PM

This is an excellent resource!

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The Best Sharing Happens Offline

The Best Sharing Happens Offline | Content in Context | Scoop.it
“Lisa Gansky, Robin Chase and Seth Godin came together to discuss the sharing economy and the ways that value is created through connecting people.”
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▶ Michel Bauwens interview with Layne Hartsell 2/3 - YouTube


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Innovation Excellence | Crowdsourcing and Co-Creation are Complementary

Innovation Excellence | Crowdsourcing and Co-Creation are Complementary | Content in Context | Scoop.it
“ The Innovation Excellence community is home to innovation articles, webinars, videos, training and education - powering successful growth in the innovation management profession.”
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Viktor Markowski's curator insight, January 7, 2013 8:11 AM

What differentiates crowdsourcing from co-creation? These two buzzwords are used a variety of contexts today, which leads to a general confusion about the difference between these terms which are, let’s admit it, conceptually close. Even Quora’s answers are more confusing than enlightning!Joyce Van Dijk brings a valuable contribution to the discussion, and in this post we will complement it by findings from an academic paper, Crowdsourcing of Inventive Activities : Definition and Limits (Penin & Burger-Helmchen, 2011). This blog post builds on this research to highlight the advantages and limits of crowdsourcing… and the complementary role of co-creation.

Jacinto Lajas's curator insight, January 8, 2013 10:08 AM

What differentiates crowdsourcing from co-creation? These two buzzwords are used a variety of contexts today, which leads to a general confusion about the difference between these terms which are, let’s admit it, conceptually close. Even Quora’s answers are more confusing than enlightning!Joyce Van Dijk brings a valuable contribution to the discussion, and in this post we will complement it by findings from an academic paper, Crowdsourcing of Inventive Activities : Definition and Limits (Penin & Burger-Helmchen, 2011). This blog post builds on this research to highlight the advantages and limits of crowdsourcing… and the complementary role of co-creation.

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'Networked minds' require fundamentally new kind of economics

'Networked minds' require fundamentally new kind of economics | Content in Context | Scoop.it
“ In their computer simulations of human evolution, scientists have discovered the emergence of the “homo socialis” with “other-regarding” preferences.”
Via Viktor Markowski
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Viktor Markowski's curator insight, March 25, 2013 12:49 PM

Economics has a beautiful body of theory. But does it describe real markets? Doubts have come up not only in the wake of the financial crisis, since financial crashes should not occur according to the then established theories. Since ages, economic theory is based on concepts such as efficient markets and the “homo economicus”, i.e. the assumption of competitively optimizing individuals and firms. It was believed that any behavior deviating from this would create disadvantages and, hence, be eliminated by natural selection. But experimental evidence from behavioral economics show that, on average, people behave more fairness-oriented and other-regarding than expected. A new theory by scientists from ETH Zurich now explains why. 

luiy's curator insight, March 25, 2013 2:33 PM

Evolution of “friendliness”


Prof. Dirk Helbing of ETH Zurich, who coordinated the study, adds: “Compared to conventional models for the evolution of social cooperation, we have distinguished between the actual behavior – cooperation or not – and an inherited character trait, describing the degree of other-regarding preferences, which we call the friendliness.” The actual behavior considers not only the own advantage (“payoff”), but also gives a weight to the payoff of the interaction partners depending on the individual friendliness. For the “homo economicus”, the weight is zero. The friendliness spreads from one generation to the next according to natural selection. This is merely based on the own payoff, but mutations happen.

For most parameter combinations, the model predicts the evolution of a payoff-maximizing “homo economicus” with selfish preferences, as assumed by a great share of the economic literature. Very surprisingly, however, biological selection may create a “homo socialis” with other-regarding preferences, namely if offsprings tend to stay close to their parents. In such a case, clusters of friendly people, who are “conditionally cooperative”, may evolve over time.

If an unconditionally cooperative individual is born by chance, it may be exploited by everyone and not leave any offspring. However, if born in a favorable, conditionally cooperative environment, it may trigger cascade-like transitions to cooperative behavior, such that other-regarding behavior pays off. Consequently, a “homo socialis” spreads.

 

 

Networked minds create a cooperative human species


“This has fundamental implications for the way, economic theories should look like,” underlines Professor Helbing. Most of today’s economic knowledge is for the “homo economicus”, but people wonder whether that theory really applies. A comparable body of work for the “homo socialis” still needs to be written.

While the “homo economicus” optimizes its utility independently, the “homo socialis” puts himself or herself into the shoes of others to consider their interests as well,” explains Grund, and Helbing adds: “This establishes something like “networked minds”. Everyone’s decisions depend on the preferences of others.” This becomes even more important in our networked world.

 

 

A participatory kind of economy


How will this change our economy? Today, many customers doubt that they get the best service by people who are driven by their own profits and bonuses. “Our theory predicts that the level of other-regarding preferences is distributed broadly, from selfish to altruistic. Academic education in economics has largely promoted the selfish type. Perhaps, our economic thinking needs to fundamentally change, and our economy should be run by different kinds of people,” suggests Grund. “The true capitalist has other-regarding preferences,” adds Helbing, “as the “homo socialis” earns much more payoff.” This is, because the “homo socialis” manages to overcome the downwards spiral that tends to drive the “homo economicus” towards tragedies of the commons. The breakdown of trust and cooperation in the financial markets back in 2008 might be seen as good example.

“Social media will promote a new kind of participatory economy, in which competition goes hand in hand with cooperation,” believes Helbing. Indeed, the digital economy’s paradigm of the “prosumer” states that the Internet, social platforms, 3D printers and other developments will enable the co-producing consumer. “It will be hard to tell who is consumer and who is producer”, says Christian Waloszek. “You might be both at the same time, and this creates a much more cooperative perspective.”

Onearth's curator insight, March 26, 2013 1:58 AM

After homo sapiens sapiens it's time for homo sapiens socialis

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Collective Intelligence: Proposed Categorization of Approach | Library of Professional Coaching

Collective Intelligence: Proposed Categorization of Approach | Library of Professional Coaching | Content in Context | Scoop.it
“ In this paper, three possible categories of collective intelligence will be proposed: Evolved Intelligence, Autonomous Collective Intelligence, and Collaborative Intelligence.”
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Scott Page on Leveraging Diversity

“ Professor Scott E. Page speaks on "Leveraging Diversity" in the Darden School of Business' Abbott Auditorium. Scott is the Leonid Hurwicz Collegiate Professo...”
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Viktor Markowski's curator insight, May 16, 2013 2:14 PM

One and a half hour of highly entertaining and high speed train thoughts on diversity and how to apply it.

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A brief history of the workspace

A brief history of the workspace | Content in Context | Scoop.it
The office: was it better before? Not so sure. Our ancestors would be shocked to see the way we work today: "comfortably" and in coworking spaces. But what did the office look like before the arrival of design, ergonomics, open space … and even the rolling office chair? We took a trip back to the past, to understand how coworking today revolutionizes our understanding of the workspace. Office work has always been associated with administrative and intellectual production. The treatment of more timely information and a quest for ever greater productivity has led to the changes in the workspace through the centuries. Much like monks in their time, the office was initially isolated. Since then, our workplaces have become more functional, productive, but also subsequently places of interaction and socialization, where the human dimension has emerged gradually. The term “community work” is also more recent than we think.
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The birth of cooperation

Mutually beneficial associations between individuals of different species, called mutualistic symbioses, have enabled major ecological innovations and underlie some of the major transitions in evolution. For example, the ancestor of plants domesticated endosymbiotic photosynthetic bacteria, today's chloroplasts, for carbon fixation. This association dramatically increased the habitat of these photosynthetic bacteria from the sea to terrestrial ecosystems. However, the colonization of land by plants required an additional symbiotic association, with fungal root symbionts that facilitate nutrient uptake. Yet, surprisingly little is known about how mutualistic symbioses evolved and persist.The birth of cooperationDuur K. Aanen, Ton BisselingScience 4 July 2014: Vol. 345 no. 6192 pp. 29-30 http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1256542
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New State of Matter Discovered: Quantum Droplets of Electrons and their Holes

New State of Matter Discovered: Quantum Droplets of Electrons and their Holes | Content in Context | Scoop.it
There was a time when states of matter were simple: Solid, liquid, gas. Then came plasma, Bose -Einstein condensate, supercritical fluid and more. Now the list has grown by one more, with the unexpected discovery of a new state dubbed “dropletons” that bear some resemblance to liquids but occur under very different circumstances. The discovery occurred when a team at the University of Colorado Joint Institute for Lab Astrophysics were focusing laser light on gallium arsenide (GaAs) to create excitons. Interacting many-body systems are characterized by stable configurations of objects—ranging from elementary particles to cosmological formations1, 2, 3—that also act as building blocks for more complicated structures. It is often possible to incorporate interactions in theoretical treatments of crystalline solids by introducing suitable quasiparticles that have an effective mass, spin or charge4, 5 which in turn affects the material’s conductivity, optical response or phase transitions2, 6, 7. Additional quasiparticle interactions may also create strongly correlated configurations yielding new macroscopic phenomena, such as the emergence of a Mott insulator8, superconductivity or the pseudogap phase of high-temperature superconductors9, 10,11. In semiconductors, a conduction-band electron attracts a valence-band hole (electronic vacancy) to create a bound pair, known as an exciton12, 13, which is yet another quasiparticle. Two excitons may also bind together to give molecules, often referred to as biexcitons14, and even polyexcitons may exist15, 16. In indirect-gap semiconductors such as germanium or silicon, a thermodynamic phase transition may produce electron–hole droplets whose diameter can approach the micrometre range17, 18. In direct-gap semiconductors such as gallium arsenide, the exciton lifetime is too short for such a thermodynamic process. Instead, different quasiparticle configurations are stabilized dominantly by many-body interactions, not by thermalization. The resulting non-equilibrium quantum kinetics is so complicated that stable aggregates containing three or more Coulomb-correlated electron–hole pairs remain mostly unexplored.Researchers now studied such a complex aggregates and identified a new stable configuration of charged particles called a quantum droplet. This configuration exists in a plasma and exhibits quantization owing to its small size. It is charge neutral and contains a small number of particles with a pair-correlation function that is characteristic of a liquid. There is experimental and theoretical evidence for the existence of quantum droplets in an electron–hole plasma created in a gallium arsenide quantum well by ultrashort optical pulses.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Many Commandments of Social Media Argumentation - Colabria

The Many Commandments of Social Media Argumentation - Colabria | Content in Context | Scoop.it
The Many Commandments of Social Media Argumentation
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Why Replacing Hierarchies is the Future of Work | Switch and Shift

Why Replacing Hierarchies is the Future of Work | Switch and Shift | Content in Context | Scoop.it
“ Worry less about the future of work and notice what is happening right now.”
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What's the Future of the Workplace?

MIT professor Thomas Malone predicts that new technologies will enable more decentralized decision making and ultimately more freedom in business.
Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Denis Pennel
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Content Discovery: RSS and the Power of Dynamic OPML Subscriptions

Content Discovery: RSS and the Power of Dynamic OPML Subscriptions | Content in Context | Scoop.it

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Fernando Zamith's curator insight, June 16, 3:19 AM

Parece interessante. Estou a experimentar.

Karen Bowden's comment, June 16, 9:54 AM
This is great! I love it! I can't wait to share some of my own lists. Thank you so much for posting this.
Robin Good's comment, June 16, 10:29 AM
Hi Karen, happy to see that you found this as useful as i did.
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US group plans floating cities with 'start-up governments'

US group plans floating cities with 'start-up governments' | Content in Context | Scoop.it
The Seasteading Institute says it hopes the floating microcountries will allow for experimentation with new ideas which current governments are too large to try. Seasteading communication director Joe Quirk says the floating cities create room for "start-up governments". "When you consider that nearly half the world's surface is a blank slate, unclaimed by existing governments, you see the potential in creating a thousand start-up governments in the sea," he said. "Seasteading comes from a very Silicon Valley perspective, that basically we don't think 193 national governments represent the range of ideas that 7 billion creative people have produced. "We think we need a sort of start-up sector for the government, a sort of Silicon Valley of the sea, where 21st century ideas for governance can be tried. .
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Spaceweaver's curator insight, June 12, 5:38 AM

Interesting!

Eli Levine's curator insight, June 12, 7:36 AM

Interesting, but expensive financially and resource-wise, and potentially dangerous to the people living in those societies and in need of networking in order to get a real national/international feel to how things work.

 

I don't understand how it wouldn't be a good thing to just re-examine history and to see how societies tick and how each society ticks and works with others.  It would save a lot of money, resources, effort, time and risk to the people who may (or may not) live on these islands.

 

The only benefit that I could see with these islands is that we may need them as the sea levels rise to provide shelter for as many people as possible, to keep our inland areas safe and habitable.  Most people live on the coast, after all, and the coast is set to move.  This may be a good solution for housing people who are going to be displaced by the rising sea levels.

 

Think about it.

Complexity Digest's comment, June 13, 7:43 PM
This could go wrong in so many ways...
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Geoff Mulgan "Openness and collective intelligence, its prospects and its challenges"

“ In his speech, Geoff Mulgan talks about collective intelligence and how we think about the idea of openness. Through several examples, he introduces a reflec...”
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The emerging science of ‘collective intelligence’ — and the rise of the global brain

The emerging science of ‘collective intelligence’ — and the rise of the global brain | Content in Context | Scoop.it
“ 6stronghands: via io9: Over at the Edge there’s a fascinating article by Thomas W.”
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Is collective stupidity just as possible as collective intelligence?

Is collective stupidity just as possible as collective intelligence? | Content in Context | Scoop.it
“ Answer (1 of 10): this study from Haifa University suggests group dynamics might undermine the process of making good decisions or arriving at correct answers. E.G. louder, more confident, but incorrect, people may overwhelm quieter, correct people.”
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Collective Intelligence vs. The Wisdom of Crowds

Collective Intelligence vs. The Wisdom of Crowds | Content in Context | Scoop.it
David Edery, who was until recently part of the CMS staff and now works for Microsoft, has been generating some interesting discussion over on his blog, Game Tycoon, about how games might harness “the wisdom of crowds” to solve real world problems. It’s an idea he’s been promoting for some time but I only recently had a chance to read through all of his discussion. He starts by describing the growing academic interest that has been generated by James Surowiecki’s The Wisdom of Crowds and then suggesting some of the challenges of applying these concepts in a real world context:
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A lifetime ban on lobbying for lawmakers? | TheHill.com

A lifetime ban on lobbying for lawmakers? | TheHill.com | Content in Context | Scoop.it
Senators Michael Bennet (D-Colo.) and Jon Tester (D-Mont.) on Tuesday introduced legislation to prevent members of Congress from becoming lobbyists after they retire.Current law allows senators to become lobbyists two years after leaving office, while House members only have to wait for a year. But Bennet and Tester's bill would institute a lifetime ban on lobbying for lawmakers.
"Washington lobbyists shouldn’t be allowed to hold more sway than the folks back home in Colorado and around the country. Unfortunately, that isn’t always the way things happen around this place," Bennet said.Bennet, the chairman of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, and Tester, who represents a swing state, said the measure would limit lobbying influence on American politics."Slamming shut the revolving door between lawmakers and lobbyists will let folks know that Congress puts constituents first and will make government more accountable to the American people," Tester said.A Center for Responsive Politics study found that more than half of currently employed former members of the last session of Congress now work at lobbying firms or as lobbying clients.Click headline to read more--
Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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