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Reflection on Transformational Learning Experience

Reflection on Transformational Learning Experience | Content in Context | Scoop.it
This is my reflective response to George’s paper on Transformational Learning Experience entitled: Designing Opportunities for Transformation with Emerging Technologies. I have divided this p...
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Content in Context
Content in Context
The making of citizen librarian in progress
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The Next Phase of Social Business is the Collaborative Economy says Jeremiah Owyang of Altimeter

The Next Phase of Social Business is the Collaborative Economy says Jeremiah Owyang of Altimeter | Content in Context | Scoop.it
Jesse Soininen's insight:

The roles of economy as we know them now are slowly shifting. Ultimately the power of being co-creator (formerly known as the "customer") will have much lager effect than most of us are willing to anticipate now.

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Catherine Pascal's curator insight, March 2, 1:46 PM

Very interesting . Thanks !

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SAMR success is NOT about Tech

SAMR success is NOT about Tech | Content in Context | Scoop.it
“Quick refresh If you aren't aware of the S.A.M.R. model (devised by Ruben R. Puentedura - @rubenrp) then in simple form it explains the common journey teachers go through when introducing technolog...”
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Open science and research initiative in Finland - Juha Haataja - YouTube

Open science and research initiative in Finland: Persistency and infrastructure as backbone for openness, Juha Haataja, Ministry of Education and Culture, Finland
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Towards a Methodology for Validation of Centrality Measures in Complex Networks

Towards a Methodology for Validation of Centrality Measures in Complex Networks | Content in Context | Scoop.it

Our empirical analysis demonstrates that in the chosen network data sets, nodes which had a high Closeness Centrality also had a high Eccentricity Centrality. Likewise high Degree Centrality also correlated closely with a high Eigenvector Centrality. Whereas Betweenness Centrality varied according to network topology and did not demonstrate any noticeable pattern. In terms of identification of key nodes, we discovered that as compared with other centrality measures, Eigenvector and Eccentricity Centralities were better able to identify important nodes.

 

Batool K, Niazi MA (2014) Towards a Methodology for Validation of Centrality Measures in Complex Networks. PLoS ONE 9(4): e90283. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0090283


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Liz Rykert's curator insight, April 15, 10:50 PM

Love this stuff.

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Complex Thinking for a Complex World – About Reductionism, Disjunction and Systemism, by Edgar Morin

This article is based on the keynote address presented to the European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR) in 2012, on the occasion of Edgar Morin receiving the Bertalanffy Prize in Complexity Thinking, awarded by the Bertalanffy Centre for the Study of Systems Science (BCSSS).
The following theses will be elaborated on: (a) The whole is at the same time more and less than its parts; (b) We must abandon the term "object" for systems because all the objects are systems and parts of systems; (c) System and organization are the two faces of the same reality; (d) Eco-systems illustrate self-organization.

 

Complex Thinking for a Complex World – About Reductionism, Disjunction and Systemism
Edgar Morin

Systema: connecting matter, life, culture and technology Vol 2, No 1 (2014)

http://www.systema-journal.org/article/view/257


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Eli Levine's curator insight, April 13, 10:21 PM

There is a kind of meditation in Buddhist practice known as analytical meditation.  It's purpose is to inform us about an object, all of its properties and all of the associations, connections and contexts that it can have in the individual and collective sense. 

 

We're not going to be perfect coming up with all of the connections all of the time.  However, I think it's a good starting basis for the purposes of analyzing complex systems and all of the layered, interconnected parts.  We are one, and one is all.

 

The universe is us as well as around us.


And that's a scientific fact, it seems.

 

Think about it.

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, April 14, 2:37 PM

objects versus systems?

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Does the secret to social impact measurement lie in algorithmic data?

Does the secret to social impact measurement lie in algorithmic data? | Content in Context | Scoop.it

The principles used to predict someone's credit score or music taste can be used to predict social outcomes, according to a data expert speaking at the Skoll World Forum in Oxford.

 

In a sector increasingly being driven towards measuring its outcomes, Jason Saul's product, created with the assistance of a musicologist at Pandora, uses former learning on social projects to assess how likely it is that social programmes will have desired results.

 

The Impact Genome Project, expected to be available at the end of the year, has a database of 78,000 "outcome data points" and will analyse the result of what would happen when these points are put together in different combinations.


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Search Engine DuckDuckGo Is Taking On Google By Doing The One Thing They Won't Do

Search Engine DuckDuckGo Is Taking On Google By Doing The One Thing They Won't Do | Content in Context | Scoop.it

They won't track you and it makes their searches better.Named after the playground game duck duck goose, the site is not just banking on the support of people paranoid about GCHQ and the NSA.

 

Its founder, Gabriel Weinberg, argues that privacy makes the web search better, not worse. Since it doesn't store your previous searches, it does not and cannot present personalized search results. That frees users from the filter bubble – the fear that, as search results are increasingly personalized, they are less likely to be presented with information that challenges their existing ideas....


Via Jeff Domansky
Jesse Soininen's insight:

Are You living inside the machine made filter bubble? Try DuckDuckGo

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, April 7, 2:30 AM

DuckDuckGo is the little search engine that could.

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Infographics & Visual Storytelling: How To Do It The Right Way

Infographics & Visual Storytelling: How To Do It The Right Way | Content in Context | Scoop.it

The marketing industry is having a similar moment with infographics. Over the last few years, infographics have become one of the most popular ways to build inbound links.

 

Publications are so saturated with infographics that there is an entire industry devoted just to highlighting and critiquing infographics published elsewhere. It’s safe to say the novelty of infographics has worn off, but the oft-mentioned quality control and saturation issues aren’t the only reasons for it.

 

Infographics aren’t dead, but it is time for marketers to draw a line in the sand and reclaim the medium. It starts by understanding the problem with infographics and then addressing the issues one by one....


Via Jeff Domansky
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, April 2, 5:54 PM

Great POV on infographics issues and trends.

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Airbnb's $10 billion value a sign of sharing-economy momentum

Airbnb's $10 billion value a sign of sharing-economy momentum | Content in Context | Scoop.it

SAN FRANCISCO -- In a defining moment for the sharing economy, Airbnb is in funding talks that would value the room- and home-renting company at $10 billion, more than some long-established hotel companies and among the highest valuations for a startup in the country.


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The Naive Optimist — No Managers: Why We Removed Bosses at Treehouse

The Naive Optimist — No Managers: Why We Removed Bosses at Treehouse | Content in Context | Scoop.it

In my experience, people want to be amazing at their job. I can’t count the number of times that people had really great ideas but were powerless to implement them. I watched as they went from zealous excitement to indifferent cynicism.

 

- See more at: http://ryancarson.com/post/61562761297/no-managers-why-we-removed-bosses-at-treehouse#sthash.kuRPSLnU.6oGVifj3.dpuf


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This Stanford team is reinventing the entire Internet for just $10M

This Stanford team is reinventing the entire Internet for just $10M | Content in Context | Scoop.it
If anyone tries to tell you that government grants play no role in technology innovation, point them to the field of software-defined networking. And soon, you might be able to point them to open s...
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NASA Study Finds That Amazon Rainforest Inhales More Carbon than It Emits

NASA Study Finds That Amazon Rainforest Inhales More Carbon than It Emits | Content in Context | Scoop.it
A new NASA-led study seven years in the making has confirmed that natural forests in the Amazon remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere than they emit, therefore reducing global warming. This finding resolves a long-standing debate about a key component of the overall carbon balance of the Amazon basin.The Amazon's carbon balance is a matter of life and death: living trees take carbon dioxide out of the air as they grow, and dead trees put the greenhouse gas back into the air as they decompose. The new study, published in Nature Communications on March 18, is the first to measure tree deaths caused by natural processes throughout the Amazon forest, even in remote areas where no data have been collected at ground level.Fernando Espírito-Santo of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., lead author of the study, created new techniques to analyze satellite and other data. He found that each year, dead Amazonian trees emit an estimated 1.9 billion tons (1.7 billion metric tons) of carbon to the atmosphere. To compare this with Amazon carbon absorption, the researchers used censuses of forest growth and different modeling scenarios that accounted for uncertainties. In every scenario, carbon absorption by living trees outweighed emissions from the dead ones, indicating that the prevailing effect in natural forests of the Amazon is absorption.Until now, scientists had only been able to estimate the Amazon's carbon balance from limited observations in small forest areas called plots. On these plots, the forest removes more carbon than it emits, but the scientific community has been vigorously debating how well the plots represent all the natural processes in the huge Amazon region. That debate began with the discovery in the 1990s that large areas of the forest can be killed off by intense storms in events called blowdowns.Espírito-Santo said that the idea for the study arose from a 2006 workshop where scientists from several nations came together to identify NASA satellite instruments that might help them better understand the carbon cycle of the Amazon. In the years since then, he worked with 21 coauthors in five nations to measure the carbon impacts of tree deaths in the Amazon from all natural causes -- from large-area blowdowns to single trees that died of old age. He used airborne lidar data, satellite images, and a 10-year set of plot measurements collected by the University of Leeds, England, under the leadership of Emanuel Gloor and Oliver Phillips. He estimates that he himself spent a year-and-a-half doing fieldwork in the Amazon.

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Forrester Report: the Next Tech Wave is Collaboration via Tablets

Forrester Report: the Next Tech Wave is Collaboration via Tablets | Content in Context | Scoop.it
Portability is Key as Tablet Ownership Climbs Toward 1 Billion Perhaps most obviously, tablets have become exceptionally popular due to their portability. In the developed world, they have become mainstays along side the smartphone and the laptop, Forrerster reported in its Global Business and Consumer Tablet Forecast Update, 2013 to 2017 report. By 2017, there will be nearly 1 billion tablets owned worldwide, Forrester reported, up from 380 million predicted in 2013. Because tablets are so portable, consumers use them for gaming, streaming media, social media and interacting with rich media from a variety of locations (above image). In the workplace, PCs still rule at the desk, but tablets now rival smartphones in terms of mobility (conference room, lunch, etc).
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Scientists Create Cybernetic Links Between People—by DJing

Scientists Create Cybernetic Links Between People—by DJing | Content in Context | Scoop.it
“Our research—the notion of feedback and complex systems—informs everything we do. A DJ and an audience are a cybernetic system, controlling each other’s state.
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Wearable Smart Glass Curates Content Based On Your Physical Response: Amoeba

This is the description about Amoeba by Sanya Rai from the video on Vimeo:"Amoeba is a wearable device that analyses your bio-parameters to understand your interest levels.It is designed to help you intuitively sift through your digital content while it analyses your likes and dislikes in the background."Yesterday, April 16, 2014, CNET Australia posted its review article about Amoeba.Here is an excerpt from it:"What if Google Glass could tell when you were interested in something — and recommend personally curated content based on a cumulative database of your likes and dislikes?We've already seen tech that responds automatically to your physiological responses; but None of these, however, have really made their way into the mainstream — but the technology has definite potential. Take a concept created by Sanya Rai, Carine Collé and Florian Puech, students at the Royal College of Art and Imperial College in the UK.It's called Amoeba, and it's an eyeglass designed to be worn when you spend time on the web."We envision that you would wear the Amoeba device before you start your web-based research," Rai wrote on her website. "As you go through different web pages, the device senses your bio-data and quantifies your interest. When you are done, you can then go to the Amoeba app and select the keyword you were looking at. The app will show you a time-based summary of all links visited, layering them based on how interesting you found the content. You also have the option of seeing the route you took to arrive at a certain page, thus enabling better reflection and self awareness."The device has sensors to measure three involuntary physical responses: your perspiration rate, your pupillary dilation and your respiration rate.The team believes this could have several potential uses. Firstly, providing advertisers with honest feedback. Another is measuring student engagement in education. For the user, of course, it could help unearth content that they otherwise might not find for themselves — a pretty intriguing prospect, although we suspect some might baulk at the notion that everything they engage with is being fed to a database and potentially sold.Still, at the moment it's only a concept, and one would hope it would remain optional, even if the team were to achieve their dream. "Our final vision would be to have Amoeba as an embedded feature in all wearable devices so that it can help streamline all content for the user, bringing to the forefront only the most interesting stuff rather than the entire daily log of data," Rai said..."Original Video: http://vimeo.com/90857768 Official Website by Sanya Rai about Amoeba:http://www.sanyarai.co.uk/#!amoeba/c11x1 Review article by CNET Australia:http://www.cnet.com.au/wearable-smart-glass-curates-content-based-on-your-physical-response-339347094.htmbut it is a summary from the long review article by Deezen:http://www.dezeen.com/2014/04/10/amoeba-wearable-headpiece-monitors-sensory-responses-digital-content-intuitive-bookmarking/ An other review article is here by Motherboard:http://motherboard.vice.com/read/this-monocle-curates-the-web-according-to-your-biological-clues
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An Occupy-Inspired App That Helps Groups Make Actual Group Decisions

An Occupy-Inspired App That Helps Groups Make Actual Group Decisions | Content in Context | Scoop.it
If you've ever tried to make a tough decision with a group of people online, then you've most likely done one of two things. You may have had a discussion over email, in which case the conversation has gotten very messy and it becomes difficult to suss out exactly where everyone stands. Or, you could have tried a poll, which doesn't give the opportunity for re-working proposals based on feedback.
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After Liberalism: Complexity in the Governance of a Networked Global Society | The World Financial Review

After Liberalism: Complexity in the Governance of a Networked Global Society | The World Financial Review | Content in Context | Scoop.it

Today’s adversaries are decentralized transnational networks that appear in many sizes and shapes; they are not geographically fixed, hierarchically governed, or bureaucratically managed.



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Open Garden

Open Garden | Content in Context | Scoop.it
Open Garden, Internet everywhere

Via Guillaume Decugis
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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, April 11, 8:09 PM

OpenGarden, a long-time Scoop.it user and the company behind the amazing success of FireChat - the first App that lets you chat without needing any connectivity - has built this beautiful integration using the Scoop.it API to showcase great stories about mesh networking and their company.

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, April 12, 11:17 AM

Worth exploring! Take a look at what this article offers!

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The Labor Transition: Shall we prepare for an “end of work”?

The Labor Transition: Shall we prepare for an “end of work”? | Content in Context | Scoop.it
In a time of emerging technologies, while artificial intelligence and adaptability of robots is getting better, a new problem may come up: will machines monopolize all active positions in our society? This fear is already topical and enabled resurgence and modernization of the Luddite thinking.(1)

Via Spaceweaver
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Spaceweaver's curator insight, April 8, 7:34 PM

Interesting article with quite a few Global Brain ideas such as the eventual merging of humans and machines.

John Lasschuit ®™'s comment, April 9, 10:49 AM
Great article. Thanks for sharing!
Mlik Sahib's curator insight, April 9, 11:16 PM

"First trail: the universal income: ...

Second trail: educational revolution and barriers to entry : ...

Third trail: Enhanced human: ...


In conclusion, facing a possible evaporation of human performed labor, we have seen above that possible solutions could be radical. History requires us attention as it left its traces in eugenic past approaches which mark our civilization of their violence. But nothing requires us to make same mistakes, as long as those who refuse to enter into this logic of mankind enhancement are not placed on the side and ostracized, and as long as our human empathy remains at the center of our values. However, it’s interesting to note that above developments seem so radical that, except prospectivists like Ray Kurzweil or Robin Hanson, most cultural works appropriating them describe dystopias. They act as whistleblowers, because in fact, this issue raises the question of what we want to make of our society. We must be careful not to distort our humanity while appropriating these technologies and the tremendous benefits they could bring us, and improve our quality of life. After having used “Birth” value as discriminant element at the center of agrarian societies, and afterwards “Work” value at the center of industrial societies... maybe it’s time to put “Knowledge” value at the center, knowledge in a sense of enrichment of people like Gene Roddenberry imagined it when he conceptualized the utopian world of Star Trek."

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Contributions and challenges for network models in cognitive neuroscience

Contributions and challenges for network models in cognitive neuroscience | Content in Context | Scoop.it

The confluence of new approaches in recording patterns of brain connectivity and quantitative analytic tools from network science has opened new avenues toward understanding the organization and function of brain networks. Descriptive network models of brain structural and functional connectivity have made several important contributions; for example, in the mapping of putative network hubs and network communities. Building on the importance of anatomical and functional interactions, network models have provided insight into the basic structures and mechanisms that enable integrative neural processes. Network models have also been instrumental in understanding the role of structural brain networks in generating spatially and temporally organized brain activity. Despite these contributions, network models are subject to limitations in methodology and interpretation, and they face many challenges as brain connectivity data sets continue to increase in detail and complexity.

 

Contributions and challenges for network models in cognitive neuroscience
• Olaf Sporns
Nature Neuroscience (2014) http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nn.3690


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The New Rules of Social Journalism: The Curators and More

The New Rules of Social Journalism: The Curators and More | Content in Context | Scoop.it

Interesting excerpt for my topic from the article by PandoDaily:
"Is all social platform content inherently untrustworthy or is it possible to elevate it with journalism’s standards of higher quality and ethics?

We know that traditional methods of screening – e.g. professional editors directly supervising every piece of content – aren’t going to work. Social sites generate too much content for that.

Before despairing the conflict is irresolvable, I’d point out that even some professional journalists rely heavily on Wikipedia, perhaps the best example of generally high-quality crowd-sourced content.

The fact is, there are ways to improve the quality, and reliability of social journalism.
Here are a bunch of practical suggestions about how to bring journalistic ethos to the new hybrid models.

- Label contributors prominently. E.g. Staff Writer. Staff Columnist. Staff Curator. Expert Contributor, Expert Curator, Guest contributor. Reader Contribution. Clue in the audience who’s who.

- Publish staff, contributor and reader credentials as part of a profile linked to all their bylines. I recommend LinkedIn style profiles, with links to articles written for the site or anyone else. Let the audience have plenty of information to decide if a contributor is trustworthy.

- Signing up a guest or expert contributor is a tacit endorsement.

- Business publication, in particular, should consider mandating that contributors take formal online ethics training.

- Getting featured on a content channel should require a curator’s approval (paid professionals or expert volunteers), rather than automated inclusion based on subject matter or pre-approval of the author.

- Unlike social networks, consider only allowing users to follow curated channels, not individual posters.

- Consistently highly-scoring content contributors (including staff) should be labeled as such, so they can gain a reputation as being trustworthy.

- If content has been rejected by curators, or not socially shared, or has poor engagement time and few up votes, screen it for deletion. Provide feedback to contributors facing deletion. Social journalism is not just about increasing the amount of content. It’s about increasing quality of information..."

The article is very long and there also is a first part that I didn't mention here.
In addition, there are more information and other suggestions by author. Read interesting original article here:
http://pando.com/2014/03/29/the-new-rules-of-social-journalism-a-proposal/

 


Via Giuseppe Mauriello
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Nine0Media's curator insight, March 31, 2:45 PM

#DIYSEO #SocialMediaTools

Neha Xavier's curator insight, April 2, 2:08 AM

Interesting!

creditrepairaid's comment, April 3, 3:23 AM
Thats astonishing...
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Every company is a media. And media don't create media about themselves.

Every company is a media. And media don't create media about themselves. | Content in Context | Scoop.it

It’s tough producing high quality media content and expensive.


Via Guillaume Decugis
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Are we finally ready to shift our focus on customer?

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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, March 28, 6:19 PM

Two other interesting observations by Tom Foremski who wrote about companies needing to become media as early as 2005:


- "Independently produced media is trusted but content produced by brands is not." 


- "Every company is a media company but media companies don’t write about themselves."


Maybe because he is a former journalist, Tom has a tendency to think that content = news - which is a restrictive definition in my opinion. We discussed that at the latest meetup on content marketing he organized in San Francisco: of course news need to be objective and brands are biased (as any media by the way but this is a different conversation).


But I pointed out first that good content can also be entertaining or educational and second that using content curation is a great way to circumvent both problems: brands which become media through content curation are relying on independently produced content and don't write about themselves.

Antoine Cheret's curator insight, April 3, 9:53 AM

Si vous êtes fatigué d'entendre dire que les marques sont des médias (et réciproquement), cet article vous confortera, en partie... Créer du contenu de marque oui, mais attention au narcissisme.

Une réflexion à poursuivre.

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Swarming in Biological and Related Systems

Swarming in Biological and Related Systems | Content in Context | Scoop.it

In the last 15 years, the collective motion of large numbers of self-propelled objects has become an increasingly active area of research. The examples of such collective motion abound: flocks of birds, schools of fish, swarms of insects, herds of animals etc. Swarming of living creatures is believed to be critical for the population survival under harsh conditions. The ability of motile microorganisms to communicate and coordinate their motion leads to the remarkably complex self-organized structures found in bacterial biofilms. Active intracellular transport of biological molecules within the cytoskeleton has a profound effect on the cell cycle, signaling and motility. In recent years, significant progress has also been achieved in the design of synthetic self-propelled particles. Their collective motion has many advantages for performing specific robotic tasks, such as collective cargo delivery or harvesting the mechanical energy of chaotic motion.

(...)

In this focus issue we have tried to assemble papers from leading experts which we hope will provide a current snapshot of this young and rapidly expanding field of research. They cover both theoretical and experimental investigations of the dynamics of active matter on different spatial and temporal scales.

 

Focus on Swarming in Biological and Related Systems
Lev Tsimring, Hugues Chate, Igor Aronson

2014 New J. Phys. 16

http://iopscience.iop.org/1367-2630/focus/Focus%20on%20Swarming%20in%20Biological%20and%20Related%20Systems


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The Connected Company › About

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Creativity, like evolution, is merely a series of thefts

Creativity, like evolution, is merely a series of thefts | Content in Context | Scoop.it
“We can blame evolution for making us little more than the glorified karaoke singers we are. Or as Voltaire put it: "originality is nothing but judicious imitation"”
Via Claudia Mihai, Complexity Digest
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Hundreds of tiny satellites could soon deliver free internet worldwide

Hundreds of tiny satellites could soon deliver free internet worldwide | Content in Context | Scoop.it
“Developers say they are less than a year away from deploying prototype satellites that could someday soon broadcast free and universal internet all over the globe from high in orbit.”
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