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Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Covering the ongoing evolution of curation & beyond; the impact & innovation http://xeeme.com/JanGordon
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How to be a Powerful Tweeter and Thrive in the Twitter Ecosystem

This piece was written by Megan Garber for The Atlantic


A study based on 43,000 responses to Tweets found precisely what people like and loathe about microblog posts.


Here are some of the findings:


**Twitter, as a communications platform, has evolved beyond nascent Twitter's charmingly mundane updates ("cleaning my apartment"; "hungry") and into something more crowd-conscious and curatorial.


**Though Twitter won't necessarily replace traditional news, it increasingly functions as a real-time newswire, disseminating and amplifying information gathered from the world and the web.


**At the same time, though, being social, it functions as a source of entertainment. Which means that we have increasingly high -- and increasingly normalized -- expectations for Twitter as both a place and a platform.


**We want it to enlighten us, but we also want it to amuse us.

In that context, tweets that are informative or funny -- or, ideally, informative and funny -- evoke the best responses.


 **Tweets that contain stale information, repeat conventional wisdom, offer uselessly de-contextual news, or extoll the virtues of the awesome salad I had for lunch today don't, ultimately, do much to justify themselves.


So: Do be useful. Do be novel. Do be compelling. Do not, under any circumstances, be boring.


This is what caught my attention:


****Contribute to the story: To keep people interested, add an opinion, a pertinent fact or otherwise add to the conversation before hitting "send" on a retweet.


Takeaway:


"The Twitter ecosystem values learning about new content," the study notes -- so new info, it seems, is new info, regardless of who provides it.  


**Sharing your own work conveys excitement about that work -- which means that self-promotion, rather than being a Twitter turn-off, can actually be an added value.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering " Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://ht.ly/8OrS8]

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What’s the #1 thing people are doing online? [Infographic]

What’s the #1 thing people are doing online? [Infographic] | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

What are you doing on the Internet? Shopping? Tweeting? Checking Facebook?


**71% of you are watching videos on Vimeo or YouTube

The infographic covers the PEW survey for the past

three years on what adults are doing on the Internet.


I love that 81% of us are using the Internet to check the weather. This is my favorite site to check the weather btw.


So what’s the #1 thing people are doing online?


Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Check it out here: [http://tnw.co/v5Ixp1]

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Emocean Club's comment, November 20, 2011 9:14 AM
Interesting. I'm surprised at the shopping numbers. I thought other sources of data had the % of people shopping online similarly high, but a much smaller % of people actually "buying" online...
janlgordon's comment, November 20, 2011 1:48 PM
Hi Darcy, I agree with you, it is a bit surprising - you would think the percentage was higher - there may be some hidden #'s they're not capturing, It'll definitely be interesting to see how how this looks after the holidays.
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Human Curation and Social media Creating Major Shifts in News - Forbes

Human Curation and Social media Creating Major Shifts in News - Forbes | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

Bill Barol wrote this article for Forbes.  It touches on two "interesting and complementary nuggets of Social Media Curation by Megan Garber of the Neiman Journalism Lab.


**** Reporting on a panel on social media best practices at the Journalism Interactive conference in New York, Garber quotes New York Times co-social media editor Liz Heron to the effect that her job “probably will not exist in five years.”


*** It’s not that social media will vanish, Heron says; it’s that they’ll emerge from their current primordial soup and suffuse all media, abrogating the need for specialist hand-holders.


Garber's other gem was reporting on a major shift in Tweeting strategy at the BBC.  :


*** “What we’ve done is turn off the auto-feed on @BBCNews during the UK daytime,” BBC social media editor Chris Hamilton told Garber. “That’s the first stage.”) Hamilton calls the change “tweeting with value”.


Then Garber points out:


** human-tweeted headlines are almost always more effective — more engaging, more inviting, more generally interesting


** Send out some humanity, get some back in return— we know that, anecdotally and implicitly


The article ends with an amusing yet accurate thought:


** In years to come we may find that the philosophical question posed by the Aaron Altman character in James Brooks’ great Broadcast News — Is it news if we don’t cover it? — gets displaced by a narrower one: Is it news if we don’t tweet it?


 http://onforb.es/s34iHF

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Why The New York Times replaced its Twitter ‘cyborg’ with people this week | Poynter.

Why The New York Times replaced its Twitter ‘cyborg’ with people this week | Poynter. | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
Standing for journalism, strengthening democracy | Journalism training, media news & how to's...
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Before You Hit The Retweet Button - Here Are Some Important Things To Consider

Before You Hit The Retweet Button - Here Are Some Important Things  To Consider | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

I selected this piece written by Stanford for Pushingsocial because I thought what he had to say was important for all of us who are on Twitter. It's also a great segue for taking our tweets/curation to the next level in 2012.


We're all curating and I believe it all begins on twitter. Our careful selection of what we tweet as well as who we retweet reflects who we are and what value we're bringing to our following.


**2012 will be all about reputation and quality, what we did last year won't cut it. We have to take our work to the next level.


The author suggests that if we abolish the RT button  it would make all of us go to the actual blog and read the article, add our own comments or maybe create our own tweet based on the article.


I thank you Stanford, for being so honest about your tweeting and for giving us food for thought before we hit the retweet button.


I can't imagine tweeting or retweeting anything, no matter who posted it, without going to the site and reading the article. There have been so many times when I saw a great headline only to be disappointed because the content had no substance, and at least one or two instances where the facts were not correct. 


So be careful! Remember that you put your name behind anything you tweet.


My advice is, don't post anything if you haven't read it and if it isn't top quality, don't retweet it.


Here's one thing that caught my attention:


Do We Need A Little Tough Love?


**I’m not advocating that Twitter scrap the retweet button but this thought experiment is intriguing.


**If anything, it reminds us that curation is more than just clicking a button.


**It requires attention to detail and delivering value.


**I wonder what would happen if content marketers and curators would implement a self-imposed retweet button boycott.


**Go back to the old-school and spend time with every blog post and craft every retweet. What would change?


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/rvfiuz]

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When Everyone is Tweeting, Who is Paying Attention?

When Everyone is Tweeting, Who is Paying Attention? | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

Food for thought from Toddi Gutner for Business2Community:


I found this piece particularly interesting and wanted to call your attention to it. It's one of those things we all experience everyday, but do we really stop to ask ourselves this question:


****Are You Mobilizing Communities or Just a Voice in the Crowd?


I've personally covered events online, tweeting the main points live and although I was able to filter and capture the essence of what was going on, I had to go back and really absorb the information and then try to apply it to my business effectively. (not always an easy task) :-)


It's a juggling act but one I think we're all experiencing on one level or another.


Excerpt:


Continuous Partial Attention (CPA) is the process of paying simultaneous but superficial attention to a number of sources of incoming information.


This term, coined by writer and consultant Linda Stone in 1998, aptly describes the scene at the recent Council of Public Relations Firms Critical Issues Forum on Social Revolution:


This is what particularly caught my attention:


**What was the unintended consequence (UC) - these being outcomes that are not intended by a purposeful action?


**They can be positive, negative or have a perverse effect contrary to what was originally intended.



****So are there any unintended consequences to compulsively tweeting from an event or otherwise?


This is a question I have yet to answer. It is sort of like waiting to see what the side effects of a drug will be years after it has been approved.


One UC of CPA may be that peoples’ attention spans (already truncated by USA Today and sound bite television) and


**related ability for analytic thought will be reduced to nanoseconds.


I'd love to hear your Thoughts?


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"


Read the full article: [http://bit.ly/vNC1cn]

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Beth Kanter's comment, November 28, 2011 3:20 PM
I just rescooped this article because I found it in another source, but here I look further into your collection and find it. I'm curating on the topic information overload and coping skills. I believe that curation can help you pay attention. I experienced this myself .. I was a conference. Many people were tweeting. I was tracking it with storify - doing content curation in real time with twitter versus tweeting helped me pay attention, quickly put together a coherrent record of what happened and make it unstandable to people not in the room.
janlgordon's comment, November 28, 2011 3:59 PM
@BethKanter
I have covered a few conferences in real-time and it definitely makes you pay attention on more than one level. Being able to put it in a cohesive manner helping people understand what's happening is an art in itself and something you do very well.
Carla Chapman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 4:49 PM

Are there unintended consequences for compulsively tweeting?  Read on....

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What is a Power Tweet? (video)

What is a Power Tweet? (video) | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
I love power tweets which is a tool used on an amazing platform, http://www.twylah.com/ currently in beta, but you can request an invite.

I've been "power tweeting" for almost 3 weeks and it definitely works! Instead of my tweets melting into thin air like snowflakes, competing for attention with millions of others, research proves, people are actually spending 4 minutes on my landing pages around topics I curate on twitter. I don't have to tell you what that means when you're building a brand.....

This video explains what a power tweet is and how to use it successfully.

http://www.johnhaydon.com/2011/06/how-use-twylah-post-power-tweets/
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