Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Covering the ongoing evolution of curation & beyond; the impact & innovation http://xeeme.com/JanGordon
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The Anatomy of an Optimized Blog Post [Infographic]

The Anatomy of an Optimized Blog Post [Infographic] | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
Back away from the "publish" button! Check out this blog post on how to optimize your blog posts before you ship them.
janlgordon's insight:

I selected this article and infographic from Hubspot because it's concise and has everything you need to create something that will provide value for your audience and give you the results you're looking from your content.


Here are some highlights:


Shorter Paragraphs


Also, part of catering to that whole people-love-to-scan-articles-on-the-web thing is writing short paragraphs. It’s much easier for people to scan when there are small chunks of content to look over -- so make sure you’re keeping your paragraphs short and sweet.


 Relevant Internal Links


Blog posts are often the first interaction people will have with your company, but you don’t want it to be the last. So make sure you’re including a reasonable number of relevant internal links to other pieces of your content throughout your post. These links could be helpful to your readers.



Smart CTA


Smart CTAs help you show tailored content to people in different lifecycle stages or lists in your database -- and because the content is more relevant to them, they’re more likely to convert.


Stay informed on trends, insights, what's happening in the digital world become a Curatti Insider today


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering Curation, Social Business and Beyond


Read more here: http://bit.ly/1ooZqEO

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How To Leverage the Science of Relationships to Gain True Influence

How To Leverage the Science of Relationships to Gain True Influence | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
If you define influence by the size of your Klout score, you can stop reading this right now. If you believe influence is driven by the creation of a re
janlgordon's insight:

This is a great article by copyblogger on how to gain true influence and the "science" behind leveraging relationships.


Here are some highlights:


*. Influence is driven by creating a relationship between two parties - where one sees the other as truly knowlegable about a prticular product or service.


* Establishing influence is a multi-step process that moves the influenced through four key stages


There is a "science" or method to doing this effectively he uses the term Propinquity - the dictionary defines this as:


Propinquity - Noun
  1. The state of being in close to someone or something; proximity.
  2. Close kinship.


There is physical propinquity and psychological propinquity - being that most of us use content to reach, engage and build relationships, he uses content creation as a means of creating influence an building trusted relationshiops.


Propiinquity theory tells us:


* the more often people see your content, the better they get to know you.


*Each time someone is exposed to your content, they are interacting with you, your thoughts and beliefs.


*This leads to a feeling of knowing you, because it mirrors how we get to know people in the real world.


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering "Curation and Social Business"


Read more here: [http://bit.ly/17jMNZs]

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Caroline Price's comment, July 16, 2013 5:59 AM
yes...some people are worthy of respect; others less so...
Therese Matthys's comment, July 16, 2013 12:34 PM
Caroline - so true!
Philippe Trebaul's comment, September 9, 2013 11:48 AM
You're all totally true. I really agree with you. I would add that "followers" are (normally, except for fake profiles...) persons. And persons MUST be respected. I agree too with you, Sigrid, concerning the fact that influence could be better mesured by interactions. Thx a lot for your reactions. It's very kind from you! Have a great week. Best regards :) Philippe
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Social Media and the Value of Controlling the Conversation

Social Media and the Value of Controlling the Conversation | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
Social media marketing must be justified. Can we measure the value of social media and the conversation it promises?
janlgordon's insight:

I selected this article by Andrew Osegi for Kunocreativ because it addresses a topic that  every social media marketer should be concerned about.


He asks a very important question:


"How do we give value to the fleeting micro engagements that make up social media interaction?"


Some insights to get you thinking and leveraging your messages and conversations online.


Here are a few highlights:


As the web grows, so too will the number of users invested in social media networking. In order for anyone (brand or individual) to reap the benefits of social, businesses must establish a reputable (i.e. searchable) presence in their niche or industry. This takes A) time and B) money.


Your social strategy must reflect, and adhere to, the measurable data produced when posting. This data will direct how you conduct future social media campaigns - where ROI really matters. More on that in this article.


He refers to social capital - In an article by Rig Dragon, social capital is difficult to predict and measure, but most definitely applicable in social media. Social media, like advertising, creates unseen impressions too important to ignore. - Good insights here!

 

Takeaway:


Think of your social media efforts as a transaction of energy. Reciprocal conversation, online or in person, is rewarding to all parties involved.


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering Curation, Social Business and Beyond


Be a  Curatti Insider  - lots of articles like this and lots more great posts and services coming!


Read more here: http://bit.ly/1u5EDMR

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janlgordon's comment, April 30, 2014 5:08 PM
Robin Martin, thanks for sharing, always appreciated!
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Social Media Strategy: Why Insight and Evidence is So Important

Social Media Strategy: Why Insight and Evidence is So Important | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
janlgordon's insight:

This great piece was written by Jeremy Waite for his blog. 

I selected it because his insights and direction are right on target.


Jeremy Waite:


"It’s been said that 85% of the people who work in social media have been in the industry for less than two years. I think it was LinkedIn who first suggested this, but it often explains why there are so many failed social media campaigns"


Here are some highlights from the author that caught my attention:


The problem here is that this lack of experience often causes a misunderstanding of what an actual social strategy is. In my opinion, the misunderstanding isn’t complicated, it is simply this…


“Strategy Does NOT Involve Emotion”


Quote from Jonah Berger Professor from Wharton: "Emotion has everything to do with social psychology and why people behave the way they do but that has nothing to do with strategy"


****It’s easy to confuse an “emotional strategy” that will raise awareness, with a business strategy that drives sales


In the article there are two illustrations of the right way to aproach a successful social media campaign and the wrong way. They show you the distinction between building a campaign on emotion and creating one on a solid foundation with the right criteria.


Here's the takeaway:


Strategy Shaped by Data and insgihts are a solid foundation to build your campaign...........  



1. Look at the data


2. Find out exactly what it is telling you


3. Build your strategy on that rock instead


Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Curation, Social Business and Beyond"


Read full article and see illustrations here: [http://bit.ly/WesiYK]

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Daniel Maina's comment, June 4, 2014 7:36 AM
Thanks for sharing:)
Daniel Maina's comment, June 4, 2014 7:36 AM
Thanks for sharing:)+
Daniel Maina's comment, June 4, 2014 7:37 AM
Thanks for sharing:)