Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Covering the ongoing evolution of curation & beyond; the impact & innovation http://xeeme.com/JanGordon
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Social Media and the Value of Controlling the Conversation

Social Media and the Value of Controlling the Conversation | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
Social media marketing must be justified. Can we measure the value of social media and the conversation it promises?
janlgordon's insight:

I selected this article by Andrew Osegi for Kunocreativ because it addresses a topic that  every social media marketer should be concerned about.


He asks a very important question:


"How do we give value to the fleeting micro engagements that make up social media interaction?"


Some insights to get you thinking and leveraging your messages and conversations online.


Here are a few highlights:


As the web grows, so too will the number of users invested in social media networking. In order for anyone (brand or individual) to reap the benefits of social, businesses must establish a reputable (i.e. searchable) presence in their niche or industry. This takes A) time and B) money.


Your social strategy must reflect, and adhere to, the measurable data produced when posting. This data will direct how you conduct future social media campaigns - where ROI really matters. More on that in this article.


He refers to social capital - In an article by Rig Dragon, social capital is difficult to predict and measure, but most definitely applicable in social media. Social media, like advertising, creates unseen impressions too important to ignore. - Good insights here!

 

Takeaway:


Think of your social media efforts as a transaction of energy. Reciprocal conversation, online or in person, is rewarding to all parties involved.


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering Curation, Social Business and Beyond


Be a  Curatti Insider  - lots of articles like this and lots more great posts and services coming!


Read more here: http://bit.ly/1u5EDMR

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janlgordon's comment, April 30, 2014 5:08 PM
Robin Martin, thanks for sharing, always appreciated!
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Interview with Andrew Grill CEO of PeopleBrowsr (Kred): Timely and relevant

Interview with Andrew Grill CEO of PeopleBrowsr (Kred): Timely and relevant | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

I posted this piece a few weeks ago and thought I'd do it again today because it's definitely something to watch in 2012.


I was on a tweet chat last night with the people from Kred and from what I heard, these people really are going to play a very important role in  reputation measurement. They seem to be transparent, willing to answer questions and respect the fact that we want to know how they come up with our scores.  They have a completely different system from their competitor.


Great interview by my friend, Robert Dempsey!


Robert Dempsey of Dempsey Marketing interviewed Andrew Grill, CEO of PeopleBrowsr, the developers of Kred.


Measuring online influence seems to be pretty hot in the marketing world these days.


The interview is split into 2 Youtube videos and will take 37 minutes of your time to watch them both, but


**I can assure you that if you have an interest in Influence Metrics, your time will be very well spent!


Here's a synopsis:


PeopleBrowsr pays Twitter for their Firehose.


For better or worse, this means that they have access to EVERY Tweet dating back to 2008 – a total of 55Bn (from approx. 100m @names) at the time of the interview, raising by approximately 1 billion each week, or 10,000 a second.


Each of us can imagine some possible negative ramifications for Twitter selling our Tweets to whoever pays the fee,


**but this particular project is all about helping people and businesses.


Grill sets up his thoughts on Influence by relating the difference between him being at a Networking event and traditional

advertising.


He would scope the crowd looking for people who look interesting, stand near them and listen for a while, finally interjecting himself into the conversation when he feels he can add something.


This, contrasting with the traditional method of advertising: going into a crowd with a megaphone!


Kred currently has two measurements:


Influence score by local community, It will create communities based around locale and sphere of influence.


He defines Influence as changing people’s minds or getting them to take an action.


Outreach score: This shows your generosity of sharing and thanking people for their tweets or recommendations


People will be able to go back any number of days to see tweets of people who interest them.


Kred will train people, not necessarily in how to raise their scores, bu]t in how to make use of what their numbers are telling them.


**Another aspect of Kred is that people can be awarded points for ‘offline influence’, such as awards they may have received



**Grill admits that it will be a couple of years before scoring platforms are able to bring people everything they might wish to see, but feels that we are on the right path.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article & listen to interview here: [http://bit.ly/sLc2el]

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The Curated Web

The Curated Web | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

Brittany Morin wrote this piece for the Huffington Post


I thought this was good article, great observations and a real grasp on curation and how to do it effectively. I'm going to refrain from reposting all the gems in this post  and instead give a commentary on something she said which I thought was a bit shortsighted.  


Here's what caught my attention:


"I believe that the people best poised to be curators of the Internet are those from the Facebook Generation -- the first generation of native web citizens, mainly people in their 20s or early 30s who have grown up with the web and can navigate, scour, synthesize and then publish the best of what's out there on a daily basis because they practically live online. It is our generation that will also be able to more easily understand where new opportunities lie because they can quickly pinpoint where the gaps are in content, services, and products."


My response:


She is right that people in their 20's or 30's are indeed well equipped to curate the web especially for their own age group as well as others for all the reasons she states.


Having said that, there are people of all ages who have been on the web for years, myself included, who have built relationships and have the ability to spot trends, gaps and potential opportunities. I seriously doubt that people in that age group know what people in their 40's, 50's & 60's might need in a trusted source or have access or the ability to ferret out every potential opportunity on the web. I would be careful about making global statements like that.


**What if people of all ages contributed to a topic together, can you imagine the collective intelligence that could come from that?


What will set a good curator apart from a person who just aggregates links is the context they can add.  Their perspective will have been gained through the humility and wisdom of life experience and can add great richness to the original content.  To be sure, I have met many wonderful GenYers who have these traits in abundance, but this is one area where a few extra years and a few extra miles can help.


Content is the new currency of the web, it is meant to be a door opener, to invite others into the conversation, building thought leadership and authority. The more people that contribute by giving comments or adding another level of context, not only does it add to our knowledge but it can build community.


I think there is an enormous opportunity for anyone who has the passion, knowledge expertise and committment to select the very best content, fact check for accuracy and is willing to put in the time to learn how to curate succesfully.


Commentary by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://huff.to/v7bGHt]

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Ove Christensen's comment, November 17, 2011 4:03 AM
Quality curation is not based on age gruoups but on engagement, openness, knowledge, context and a lot of other stuff - but claiming that a curators age is something of particular interest is rubbish to me.
janlgordon's comment, November 17, 2011 11:53 AM
Hi Ove, As you know I agree with you - curation is moving towards "collective intelligence" it's a wonderful time to expand our knowledge, build community and who knows what lies beyond the horizon.
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How A Social Media User Becomes A Social Media Leader - What You Need To Do

How A Social Media User Becomes A Social Media Leader - What You Need To Do | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This article was written by Dave Larsen for Kissmetrics, he has some very good advice and takeaways.


Excerpt:


As you build your reputation as a leader, your reputation will begin to take on a life of its own.


"I abandoned my twitter account months ago. My abandoned account got tens of thousands of followers anyway. It was an incredible lesson to me. Many people even kept tweeting personal recommendations of the old account name until they figured out the change.


Because it was on tons of list, recommended in many, many blog posts, etc., people attracted to the reputation just kept arriving.


****And all I did was start by helping. Done right, helping is the highest quality and most efficient interaction possible, as it also creates connections, and builds reputation.


****Everyone can help someone.


****If you can help one person, you can help two, and if you can help two, you have already started building a community, and creating your reputation as a leader in that community.


Don’t lose sight of always creating quality interactions and making quality connections.


****Use the quality scale and be ruthless with your time, and you too can quickly be acknowledged as an awesome leader yourself!"


Read full article: [http://blog.kissmetrics.com/social-media-leader/


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Companies scouring social networks looking for the new "influencers"

Companies scouring social networks looking for the new "influencers" | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
Believe it or not, if you're on Facebook, Twitter or other social networks, you're being watched and scored. You probably already know this, according to this New York Times article, some pretty interesting things are happening along these lines.

Here's an excerpt:

IMAGINE a world in which we are assigned a number that indicates how influential we are. This number would help determine whether you receive a job, a hotel-room upgrade or free samples at the supermarket. If your influence score is low, you don’t get the promotion,

This is not science fiction. It’s happening to millions of social network users.

http://bit.ly/iFUyQh
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Do You Know How Social Currency Influences Behavior?

Do You Know How Social Currency Influences Behavior? | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
Conversation Agent quotes on Influence from Valeria Maltoni It's the age of the connected customer and people are now comfortable using technology to share -- privately or in public.


Here are some highlights:


How social currency influences behavior


**Social influences include peer pressure and social exchange. The latter is stronger than an economic motive.


**Most human interactions consist of an exchange of value. From a psychological standpoint, actions like sharing signal desire for self expression, need for validation, and social status recognition, and also simply altruism and affinity with a group or cause.


**Both social influences are amplified in public settings.


Psychologist Robert Cialdini documented six principles of ethical persuasion:


**social proof


**authority


**affinity


**commitment


**consistency


**reciprocity


Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Curation, Social Business and Beyond"


Read full article, see slideshare, images here: [http://bit.ly/VySDuu]

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Thomas Wooldridge's comment, April 19, 2013 7:17 AM
social Proof.. It is what we all seek
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One of the Best Videos on Content Curation

http://www.networkempire.com/curation-intro-sign-up/ In this video, natural language processing expert Russell Wright explains the difference between premium and other curation models.


This video is worth watching more than once. Lots of great information!


Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UV--va4x2n0

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ItsaRep's comment, November 18, 2011 6:38 AM
Hi Jan,

Kudo's for your scoop-its! like your style and selection!
Ward van Beek, GotContent
janlgordon's comment, November 18, 2011 8:51 AM
Hi Ward,

Thanks for your kind words, I really appreciate it!

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Five Social Media Trends for 2012

Five Social Media Trends for 2012 | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

 Stephanie Schwab wrote this article for Social Media Explorer


It's that most wonderful time of the year ... time to predict the future as we close out the year!


Stephanie Schwab has given us some great observations about the year ahead.


Here are a few things that caught my attention:


Social Media Influence


2012 is not going to be the year that a perfect tool emerges, but it will be a year for broad adoption of the ranking tools and lots of C-suite talk about “influence” in general.


Convergence of Marketing & Technology & Data


Marketers are going to take technology into their own hands and either train or hire people within their own departments who can move much more nimbly and creatively than traditional tech departments can:


Gleaning insights out of Google Analytics, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube; they use the data generated to determine:


****what content to provide within each of their platforms, to develop better promotions and events


****to figure out which products are resonating within various consumer communities


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Covering Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/s1pK55]

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Measuring Online Influence & It’s Impact On Social Media

Measuring Online Influence & It’s Impact On Social Media | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it


Robert Dempsey of Dempsey Marketing interviewed Andrew Grill of PeopleBrowsr, the developers of Kred.


Measuring online influence seems to be pretty hot in the marketing world these days.


The interview is split into 2 Youtube videos and will take 37 minutes of your time to watch them both, but


**I can assure you that if you have an interest in Influence Metrics, your time will be very well spent!


Here's a synopsis:


PeopleBrowsr pays Twitter for their Firehose.


For better or worse, this means that they have access to EVERY Tweet dating back to 2008 – a total of 55Bn (from approx. 100m @names) at the time of the interview, raising by approximately 1 billion each week, or 10,000 a second.


Each of us can imagine some possible negative ramifications for Twitter selling our Tweets to whoever pays the fee,


**but this particular project is all about helping people and businesses.


Grill sets up his thoughts on Influence by relating the difference between him being at a Networking event and traditional

advertising.


He would scope the crowd looking for people who look interesting, stand near them and listen for a while, finally interjecting himself into the conversation when he feels he can add something.


This, contrasting with the traditional method of advertising: going into a crowd with a megaphone!


Kred currently has two measurements:


Influence score by local community, It will create communities based around locale and sphere of influence.


He defines Influence as changing people’s minds or getting them to take an action.


Outreach score: This shows your generosity of sharing and thanking people for their tweets or recommendations


People will be able to go back any number of days to see tweets of people who interest them.


Kred will train people, not necessarily in how to raise their scores, bu]t in how to make use of what their numbers are telling them.


**Another aspect of Kred is that people can be awarded points for ‘offline influence’, such as awards they may have received



**Grill admits that it will be a couple of years before scoring platforms are able to bring people everything they might wish to see, but feels that we are on the right path.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article & listen to interview here: [http://bit.ly/sLc2el]

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Klout, PeerIndex, Empire Avenue, Et Al... Shortcuts Without Insights - SVW

Klout, PeerIndex, Empire Avenue, Et Al... Shortcuts Without Insights - SVW | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
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