Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Covering the ongoing evolution of curation & beyond; the impact & innovation http://xeeme.com/JanGordon
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Is Content Curation Stealing or a Shrewd B2B Marketing Practice?

Is Content Curation Stealing or a Shrewd B2B Marketing Practice? | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This very timely article was written by Andrew Hunt, founder of Inbound Sales Network, for Business2Community.

 

It raises an issue between original Content Creators, Content Curators and people who repost these articles.

 

Commentary by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"

 

The reason I was moved to do this commentary is because I see a wonderful opportunity to come together as a community and help shape the future of curation. Content Curation is in its infancy and there’s a lot of misunderstanding about its potential. As I see it, it’s a brilliant B2B marketing strategy for anyone who is selling a product or service if done responsibly.

 

Content Curators are providing a very valuable service for the original author and their own audiences.

 

 

Here is what ethical, responsible curators are providing for content creators:

 

1. Syndicating content and introducing it to new audiences, which is excellent PR if it is being curated by a “trusted source”

 

2. A good headline grabs the attention of a reader and gets them into the piece quickly. A curator who can tailor the headline to grab their audience will inevitably send more traffic to the original article

 

3. A curator who is skilled at adding commentary and context to the original piece also broadens the audience of the original work

 

4. Curation is one of the building blocks of collective intelligence

 

5. If a curator fully accredits both author and article, authors might have a whole new area of exposure/distribution channel that they wouldn’t have had before

 

6. People get paid to market and open up new business for brands. Curators do this free of charge while building their own audience. Each party gains. It is a new and exciting form of symbiosis in business

 

 

I know that there are people out there who are just taking people’s work. I have spent time adding commentary only to find it has been published on Facebook and other sites without giving credit to me or the original author. They use it for their own gain but I think and hope this will become more the exception as Curation matures.

 

I like many of my colleagues are building our brands and want to be known for selecting only the best content that informs and educates our audience. We want authors to want us to curate for them and feel that we’re working in concert not on opposing teams. We want them to be happy that we're taking the time to find the essence in what they’re saying and take it to a whole new audience. It is a part of our job to bring authors to the attention of people who would not otherwise know of them.

 

 

This was a Q & A at the end of the original article in Business2Community:

 

(q) How is content curation different from stealing?

 

(a) Great question! Part of the genesis of Aggregage was my experience with “curators” who would take my content, put it on a page with no link or a link that had an anchor tag that said “link” or something similar. They would change the title and URL for my post on their site. The goal of that person was to get SEO value from my content.

They also allowed commenting on their sites. The reason I would write the post is for people to find me and my content and to engage with me in conversation.

These types of curators were definitely taking away from that. Aggregage takes a very different approach. Our goal is to be THE launching point out to all the great content getting created on particular topics. We specifically do not have pages that compete with the original source. We only show snippets.

We provide full links with the original title. We don’t have commenting on our site. Basically, we are doing everything we can to get readers to go to the original source and engage with the content. Many of the participating bloggers find that we become the second biggest referral source behind Google search.

 

 

My take is that we're still in the early stages of curation and while I understand resentment to curators who do not fully attribute their work. However, it is incorrect to assume that changing headlines and URLs automatically means that people are stealing your work strictly for their own gain. That's not how this works with people who are serious about curation.

 

The end goal  and my vision is for us to build community and broaden the audience of the content producers who we promote while building a niche audience of our own who trust that we are cutting through the noise to bring them the few articles they will hopefully find relevant. My community is the authors whose work I curate, the audience I bring their work to and other curators. I appreciate and nurture each relationship equally.

 

There are so many of you who could add brilliant insights, would love to hear your thoughts.

 

Read the original article: [http://bit.ly/u89c95]

 

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janlgordon's comment, November 28, 2011 4:30 PM
@bethkanter
Would love to meet you in NY! In the meantime, let's do connect next week and start the conversation, really looking forward to it, lots to talk about:-)
Liz Wilson's comment, November 29, 2011 3:17 AM
Jan, Thank you for this commentary - I completely agree with you. I would also emphasise that a curator must (in my opinion) take responsibility for ensuring what is curated is true/honest/accurate/fair, which involves thoroughly checking the source article's credibility.

Great piece - thanks again.
janlgordon's comment, November 29, 2011 1:08 PM
@Liz Wilson
Thanks for your comments. I absolutely agree with everything you said here.
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Social Media is relational, not transactional.

This is a very interesting article by Joshua Leatherman for Social Media Today.  He relates to us about how some years ago, newtwork marketers 'invaded' bookstores in Grand Rapids, Michigan, posing as people who were genuinly interested in what books that their marks were reading, building ultimately a false relationship based around this supposed common ground before moving in with their pitch.... and generally annoying the hell out of their quarry.


As this exact scenario didn't happen to me, I chose to read his anecdotes as allegory.  I have certainly been accosted in various venues and platforms by people who have made some effort at building a false relationship before revealing their true aim.  I too have felt my time has been wasted and that I have been misled.


Leatherman points out that this behavior is entirely unacceptable within Social Media, and few people who are reading this will have cause to disagree. 


He gives us 5 hints on how a personal social media account can be used in order to attract business to a corporate account in a manner that first builds trust and relationship on a personal level.  This will distinguish the savvy social media person from the network marketer we all seek to avoid.  The article is defininitely well worth the read:


http://socialmediatoday.com/joshleatherman/358135/essential-rule-1-social-media-relational-not-transactional

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Klout Perks – Going Beyond the Social Media Checkin

Great post by my pal, Robert Caruso, founder of Bundlepost!!

As most of you know I am heavily involved in most things in social media. I was an early adopter of Foursquare, HootSuite and Klout. I am constantly checking in when I am out and about and love how it fosters discussions. Due to how often I discuss coffee and/or am meeting at Starbucks, I even made Brian Solis’ blog post about “the top 100 most connected people within the group mentioning Starbucks” back in February. Check out number 90. :-)

The fact that I discuss coffee and Starbucks so frequently has resulted in being constantly jabbed by friends and followers. It has also become an incredible connection point to build closer relationships with many people simply because we have this love in common. This common connection leads to conversation, which leads to relationships, which leads to discussing business. This is social media at its core.

http://bit.ly/iU7V7t
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What Makes A Great Curator Great?

What Makes A Great Curator Great? | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This piece was brilliantly written by my fellow curator, Robin Good for those of you who haven't read this.


Beth Kanter has added some very valuable insights so I am reposting this. I might also add that Beth Kanter is an example of what Robin refers to as a great curator. When you go to her blog, you will see that she consistently produces value for her readers by following what Robin suggests makes someone great.


I agree with Beth that Giuseppe Mauriello is also a trusted source and provides value for his readers.

                       

                                           ******************************


Sorry my commentary is so long but this was so thought provoking, I just couldn't help myself:-)


The headline draws you in and the material more than delivers on that promise. What makes a great curator is clearly demonstrated in this piece. Bravo Robin!


I'm not going to repost what Robin has said but add my own comments, just as if I were in a conversation with him.


In Robin's own words - A great curator does the following:


"Optimizes, Edits, Formats, Selects, Excerpts, Writes, Classifies, Links, Personalizes, Vets, Credits, Filters, Taps, Suggests, Searches, Scouts, Hacks Filters and Searches, Is Transparent, Recommends, Crowdsources"


As you read this article, pay attention to how he has done all the above. He creates a standard, he gives you some criteria so you can understand what makes someone great and what makes someone no so great.


****He is responding to an article he read in Forbes about curation which talks about  the importance of keywords.  Robin stresses the importance of "human curation" adding your personal touch and bringing added value to what you're curating and not trying to fit what you're saying into keywords that will draw traffic from the search engines.  


These are my comments..........


**** Curation is new and is evolving.  Water rises to its own level.  The people who know why they're curating, who their audience is, how they consume information and what they need, and then act on this, will become great trusted sources.


Some people just want information. Others want to engage by adding comments or another layer of context. There's a rhythm to this and it takes time to find the right balance.


I think a great curator is a good listener and a keen observer who selects content that "speaks to the audience's listening".  Paying attention to this and fine tuning your approach takes a lot of work but it's worth it. I'm inserting a direct quote from Robin:


"One point: I believe that curators, as I see them, should rarely if ever be driven by analytics data or statistics but to their personal experience and viewpoint. Their goal is not in fact to go after the broadest and most numerous audience but have the humbleness and vision to serve a very specific need and tribe."


If you're passionate and knowledgable about the topic you're curating, and you are committed to serving your readers, you will be great.


In business you have to have a unique sales proposition. Adding context to what you curate will set you apart from others and make you great. This is your place to contribute something new, perhaps you disagree with what was said and you bring a new perspective. Anything you can do to expand the piece and add dimension to it is valuable to others.


Robin produced this video in 2009 with Gerd Leonhard, a highly respected media futurist. It is excellent. The title speaks for itself: "The Relevance Of Context In Content Curation http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lDo6YrJKaoM.


There is also another piece "Context Not Content is King" by Arnold Waldstein I posted this some time ago. It is very relevant today and hopefully sheds more light on what will set you apart from people who are just aggregating links.


Last but not least......

 

Robin also has a view point and invites us into a conversation when he discusses the scoring system which you will see when you read the article. It makes me want to  respond, it's a two way dialogue between him and me, he's not just talking at me by reposting content without adding anything else.


I happen to agree with him about this but that's a whole other discussion.


Curated by JanLGordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"


This is only a taster.  To see the full article by a true master-curator at the top of his game, click here

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Robin Good's comment, November 6, 2011 11:44 AM
Exactly Beth!

I couldn't have said better. Thanks for clarifying this further.
Nancy White's curator insight, March 10, 4:37 PM
Oh my - all of my favorite  thought leaders on curation in one spot! This immediately caught my eye and introduced a new way for me to look at curation- as a way to "find your tribe."
Duncan Cole's curator insight, March 11, 2:59 PM
If you are looking for some good advice and insight into how to develop into a great content curator, this is a great article from a few years ago from Robin Good. The additional insight from other curators adds another dimension, and I would suggest looking at this in some detail. It is clearly more effort to curate well, but then high quality work usually does.
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The Holistic Approach To Social Media: Determining your target customer

The Holistic Approach To Social Media: Determining your target customer | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

In this guest post for Socialmouths, Dave Van de Walle of Area224 and 12 Minute Marketing urges Social Media marketers to get back to basics:

 

"Part of the fact that the Four Ps (Product, Price, Place, Promotion) don’t get too much attention has something to do with bias – you are biased toward those things you do most, or best, as a business person. So if you’re a PR Guy, you might tilt toward Promotion. If you’re a computer programmer writing software, you are probably zeroed in on Product. And so on… but, because of your bias, and that of your boss or your client or the woman who owns your company, you get a very “siloed” and not-very-holistic approach to whatever it is you’re working on."

 

Basic stuff for many marketers but too many people are losing sight of the ultimate reason for their social media campaigns: to sell their product, which may be themselves, to their target customer.

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