Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Covering the ongoing evolution of curation & beyond; the impact & innovation http://xeeme.com/JanGordon
Curated by janlgordon
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Increase Your Facebook Ads Revenue

Increase Your Facebook Ads Revenue | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
Facebook ads are not only a great way to grow your business Page -- they also can help improve your website traffic and conversion rates.
janlgordon's insight:

I selected this article from Curatti written by Susan Gilbert because it explains how to increase your subscribers and conversions through Facebook advertising.

 

You can remind your prospects about what you have to offer directly through their Facebook account.

 

Remarket Your Social Ads For More Sales

 

By using Facebook Pixel and Custom Audiences your business can directly target ready buyers. I agree that these features can help improve your conversion rates and bring more visibility to your website.

 

Gilbert shows how to target the right market through Facebook's unique advertising platform.

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

  • Your ads can now be displayed to your readers in several ways. This includes being able to track your ad performance, bidding for conversions through Facebook pixel, and placing your products or services in front of your interested visitors.

 

  • The more narrow your focus is within your target market the better results you will achieve. Instead of mass marketing to a larger group drill down to a specific segment.

 

  • Facebook retargeting can help your business retain its website visitors. Because they are familiar with your brand they will be more likely to make a purchase.

 

Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering Curation, Social Business and Beyond

 

Image: Courtesy of Pixabay.

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Read full article here: http://ow.ly/iisM304oIq5

 

Stay informed on trends, insights, what's happening in the digital world become a Curatti Insider today

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janlgordon's comment, September 21, 2016 8:55 PM
Thank you @malek :-)
janlgordon's comment, September 22, 2016 10:36 AM
Thank you @Ricard Lloria & @Skylly_W :-)
janlgordon's comment, October 7, 2016 11:01 PM
Thank you @Skylly_W :-)
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Is Content Curation Stealing or a Shrewd B2B Marketing Practice?

Is Content Curation Stealing or a Shrewd B2B Marketing Practice? | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This very timely article was written by Andrew Hunt, founder of Inbound Sales Network, for Business2Community.

 

It raises an issue between original Content Creators, Content Curators and people who repost these articles.

 

Commentary by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"

 

The reason I was moved to do this commentary is because I see a wonderful opportunity to come together as a community and help shape the future of curation. Content Curation is in its infancy and there’s a lot of misunderstanding about its potential. As I see it, it’s a brilliant B2B marketing strategy for anyone who is selling a product or service if done responsibly.

 

Content Curators are providing a very valuable service for the original author and their own audiences.

 

 

Here is what ethical, responsible curators are providing for content creators:

 

1. Syndicating content and introducing it to new audiences, which is excellent PR if it is being curated by a “trusted source”

 

2. A good headline grabs the attention of a reader and gets them into the piece quickly. A curator who can tailor the headline to grab their audience will inevitably send more traffic to the original article

 

3. A curator who is skilled at adding commentary and context to the original piece also broadens the audience of the original work

 

4. Curation is one of the building blocks of collective intelligence

 

5. If a curator fully accredits both author and article, authors might have a whole new area of exposure/distribution channel that they wouldn’t have had before

 

6. People get paid to market and open up new business for brands. Curators do this free of charge while building their own audience. Each party gains. It is a new and exciting form of symbiosis in business

 

 

I know that there are people out there who are just taking people’s work. I have spent time adding commentary only to find it has been published on Facebook and other sites without giving credit to me or the original author. They use it for their own gain but I think and hope this will become more the exception as Curation matures.

 

I like many of my colleagues are building our brands and want to be known for selecting only the best content that informs and educates our audience. We want authors to want us to curate for them and feel that we’re working in concert not on opposing teams. We want them to be happy that we're taking the time to find the essence in what they’re saying and take it to a whole new audience. It is a part of our job to bring authors to the attention of people who would not otherwise know of them.

 

 

This was a Q & A at the end of the original article in Business2Community:

 

(q) How is content curation different from stealing?

 

(a) Great question! Part of the genesis of Aggregage was my experience with “curators” who would take my content, put it on a page with no link or a link that had an anchor tag that said “link” or something similar. They would change the title and URL for my post on their site. The goal of that person was to get SEO value from my content.

They also allowed commenting on their sites. The reason I would write the post is for people to find me and my content and to engage with me in conversation.

These types of curators were definitely taking away from that. Aggregage takes a very different approach. Our goal is to be THE launching point out to all the great content getting created on particular topics. We specifically do not have pages that compete with the original source. We only show snippets.

We provide full links with the original title. We don’t have commenting on our site. Basically, we are doing everything we can to get readers to go to the original source and engage with the content. Many of the participating bloggers find that we become the second biggest referral source behind Google search.

 

 

My take is that we're still in the early stages of curation and while I understand resentment to curators who do not fully attribute their work. However, it is incorrect to assume that changing headlines and URLs automatically means that people are stealing your work strictly for their own gain. That's not how this works with people who are serious about curation.

 

The end goal  and my vision is for us to build community and broaden the audience of the content producers who we promote while building a niche audience of our own who trust that we are cutting through the noise to bring them the few articles they will hopefully find relevant. My community is the authors whose work I curate, the audience I bring their work to and other curators. I appreciate and nurture each relationship equally.

 

There are so many of you who could add brilliant insights, would love to hear your thoughts.

 

Read the original article: [http://bit.ly/u89c95]

 

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janlgordon's comment, November 28, 2011 4:30 PM
@bethkanter
Would love to meet you in NY! In the meantime, let's do connect next week and start the conversation, really looking forward to it, lots to talk about:-)
Liz Wilson's comment, November 29, 2011 3:17 AM
Jan, Thank you for this commentary - I completely agree with you. I would also emphasise that a curator must (in my opinion) take responsibility for ensuring what is curated is true/honest/accurate/fair, which involves thoroughly checking the source article's credibility.

Great piece - thanks again.
janlgordon's comment, November 29, 2011 1:08 PM
@Liz Wilson
Thanks for your comments. I absolutely agree with everything you said here.
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Here's How to Get Your Message In Front Of Early-Stage B2B Buyers

Here's How to Get Your Message In Front Of Early-Stage B2B Buyers | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
A recent article in BtoB Magazine highlights how marketing to the electronics engineering vertical is changing due to technological innovation and the demands of a more specialized (and time-constrained) workforce.
janlgordon's insight:



Derek Edmond wrote this article for searchengineland - I selected it because in today's world there's too much noise - getting attention from the right people will require knowledge and strategy.


The focus of the article centers around content marketing designed to attract buyers at every stage of the buying cycle, particularly early-stage awareness. which is exactly where you want to be.


Here's what you need to know:


Search is one of the first places where buyers start.


According to Pardot’s 2013 State of Demand Generation Report, 72% of product research for a future business purchase beginning on Google.


But savvy search engine marketers understand that onsite content is only one destination buyers will look to find information, assuming that content is found in search engine results.


Here's something you need to do:


Where B2B Marketers Start Buying Research: Pardot 2013 State of Demand Generation Report


Placing content marketing assets in destinations that provide a good opportunity to be found in search engine results — and also represent locations where target audiences find and share information — which is a critical component of B2B SEO.


The direct correlation is through inbound link acquisition. The long-term opportunity is the association with trusted communities and places of industry influence and trust.


There are twenty different third party sites and sources B2B marketers should consider for placing content in their SEO strategy.


I have highlighted a few that caught my attention:


Google Properties (YouTube, Google+, etc) — unique, quality content throughout Google properties isn’t just about social networking. It should provide a direct association between an organization, its thought leaders, and keyword-related objectives to the search engine.


Industry-Specific Forums — for informational search queries, we often find forum threads in search results. Forum communities are an underrated resource for developing valuable discussions and establishing brand / individual trust.


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering Curation, Social Business and Beyond


Read more here: [http://selnd.com/16vN3SR]

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