Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Covering the ongoing evolution of curation & beyond; the impact & innovation http://xeeme.com/JanGordon
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Human Curation and Social media Creating Major Shifts in News - Forbes

Human Curation and Social media Creating Major Shifts in News - Forbes | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

Bill Barol wrote this article for Forbes.  It touches on two "interesting and complementary nuggets of Social Media Curation by Megan Garber of the Neiman Journalism Lab.


**** Reporting on a panel on social media best practices at the Journalism Interactive conference in New York, Garber quotes New York Times co-social media editor Liz Heron to the effect that her job “probably will not exist in five years.”


*** It’s not that social media will vanish, Heron says; it’s that they’ll emerge from their current primordial soup and suffuse all media, abrogating the need for specialist hand-holders.


Garber's other gem was reporting on a major shift in Tweeting strategy at the BBC.  :


*** “What we’ve done is turn off the auto-feed on @BBCNews during the UK daytime,” BBC social media editor Chris Hamilton told Garber. “That’s the first stage.”) Hamilton calls the change “tweeting with value”.


Then Garber points out:


** human-tweeted headlines are almost always more effective — more engaging, more inviting, more generally interesting


** Send out some humanity, get some back in return— we know that, anecdotally and implicitly


The article ends with an amusing yet accurate thought:


** In years to come we may find that the philosophical question posed by the Aaron Altman character in James Brooks’ great Broadcast News — Is it news if we don’t cover it? — gets displaced by a narrower one: Is it news if we don’t tweet it?


 http://onforb.es/s34iHF

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The NYT launches a Twitter feed for live coverage of breaking news

The NYT launches a Twitter feed for live coverage of breaking news | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
Creating a separate space for covering big events is a way to avoid flooding the feeds of @nytimes' 3.6 million followers.

 

 

The NYT launches a Twitter feed for live coverage of breaking news

Creating a separate space for covering big events is a way to avoid flooding the feeds of @nytimes’ 3.6 million followers.

 

By Megan Garber

 

As Hurricane Irene storms its way toward the Eastern seaboard — and as news organizations scramble to cover it — The New York Times has launched @NYTLive, a Times-run account featuring “in-depth Twitter curation of major news stories by New York Times editors.”

 

In the hour since the feed’s been live, it’s served as a hurricane-tweet clearinghouse, sharing tweets from the Times’ Metro desk, @NYTMetro, as well as — quite interesting from the whole individual-vs.-institutional-brand perspective — Times reporters Thomas Kaplan and Brian Stelter. (The latter, who’s currently in North Carolina covering the storm, also had a link to his Twitter feed featured on the Times’ homepage earlier today.)

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An Analogy of Thomas Edison and Steve Jobs

An Analogy of Thomas Edison and Steve Jobs | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

Written by Randall Strauss New York Times today (Sunday)


Curated by JanLGordon "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Very moving piece, just had to share it......


"The deaths of Thomas Edison and Steve Jobs brought outpourings of public grief, but while both were celebrated for their genius, Mr. Jobs was also remembered for his humanity."


Excerpt:


The broad outpouring that has followed the death of Steve Jobs reminds me of the display of grief following Edison’s death.


**In both cases, their passing evoked an extraordinary public response, tributes that were greater and broader than those paid to many a head of state. Why is that?


Both men have fully occupied my attention at different times. I wrote a book about Mr. Jobs in 1993. I looked at his struggling endeavor to start another computer company, NeXT, after he left Apple amid a power struggle in 1985.


His return to Apple in 1997 and the triumphs that would follow were not within sight. I took my snapshot of him and the company when he was at the miserable nadir of his professional life.


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/09/business/an-analogy-of-thomas-edison-and-steve-jobs.html?_r=1

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Viqi French's comment, October 9, 2011 3:38 PM
Great find, Jan. So many similarities between Edison and Jobs. Really something to ponder about how history will view Jobs: huge!!