Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Covering the ongoing evolution of curation & beyond; the impact & innovation http://xeeme.com/JanGordon
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7 Tips To Help You Focus In Age of Distraction: Are You Content Fried!

7 Tips To Help You Focus In Age of Distraction:  Are You Content Fried! | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This weekend I'm focusing on information, filtering and meaning overload and useful ways to manage and utilize it. Having said that, there's so much good information, insights and tips in this post, I have to digest it slowly.


Beth Kanter has written a great post on this subject, sharing the way she's dealing with it and the 44 people who commented on it have some great things to add to the discussion.


Intro:


This morning I learned a new word for information overload - content fried from a colleague at the Packard Foundation.    It resonated.


I identify with this, here's what really caught my attention:


"The biggest difficulty I experience is the shifting from this forward flowing process of consuming, curating, and sense-making of content to learn versus to get something done".


****The latter requires a different type of attention and whole new set of information coping skills


Howard Rheingold calls this process managing your attention or “Infotention” and it is what he has been teaching in his courses.


I’ve been trying to curate content that offers ideas, tips, and resources to get past that ugly feeling of “content fried.” He curated the above mindmap.


Manage Your Attention, Not Just Your Time:


Don’t just create a to do list, lay it out on daily and weekly schedule, breaking down key tasks of the project to chunks.


****But consider the level of concentration and focus that each type of task or chunk requires – and schedule accordingly.


My question to you is:


What are your challenges? What ways are you drowning or prospering in this area? I'd love to hear from you.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/z84mSv]

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Beth Kanter's comment, January 21, 2012 8:19 PM
Thanks Jan for curating this post. As I mentioned in Facebook, I have really been helped by Bregman's book, 18 MInutes! His techniques are fantastic. The book is written using stories to illustrate is concepts. I've been slowly trying to put them into practice. It takes discipline
janlgordon's comment, January 21, 2012 8:26 PM
Beth Kanter
I am definitely going to get this book - your post is so full of great information and resources - so helpful, thanks.
Beth Kanter's comment, February 16, 2012 4:38 PM
thanks for sharing my post
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When Everyone is Tweeting, Who is Paying Attention?

When Everyone is Tweeting, Who is Paying Attention? | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

Food for thought from Toddi Gutner for Business2Community:


I found this piece particularly interesting and wanted to call your attention to it. It's one of those things we all experience everyday, but do we really stop to ask ourselves this question:


****Are You Mobilizing Communities or Just a Voice in the Crowd?


I've personally covered events online, tweeting the main points live and although I was able to filter and capture the essence of what was going on, I had to go back and really absorb the information and then try to apply it to my business effectively. (not always an easy task) :-)


It's a juggling act but one I think we're all experiencing on one level or another.


Excerpt:


Continuous Partial Attention (CPA) is the process of paying simultaneous but superficial attention to a number of sources of incoming information.


This term, coined by writer and consultant Linda Stone in 1998, aptly describes the scene at the recent Council of Public Relations Firms Critical Issues Forum on Social Revolution:


This is what particularly caught my attention:


**What was the unintended consequence (UC) - these being outcomes that are not intended by a purposeful action?


**They can be positive, negative or have a perverse effect contrary to what was originally intended.



****So are there any unintended consequences to compulsively tweeting from an event or otherwise?


This is a question I have yet to answer. It is sort of like waiting to see what the side effects of a drug will be years after it has been approved.


One UC of CPA may be that peoples’ attention spans (already truncated by USA Today and sound bite television) and


**related ability for analytic thought will be reduced to nanoseconds.


I'd love to hear your Thoughts?


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"


Read the full article: [http://bit.ly/vNC1cn]

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Beth Kanter's comment, November 28, 2011 3:20 PM
I just rescooped this article because I found it in another source, but here I look further into your collection and find it. I'm curating on the topic information overload and coping skills. I believe that curation can help you pay attention. I experienced this myself .. I was a conference. Many people were tweeting. I was tracking it with storify - doing content curation in real time with twitter versus tweeting helped me pay attention, quickly put together a coherrent record of what happened and make it unstandable to people not in the room.
janlgordon's comment, November 28, 2011 3:59 PM
@BethKanter
I have covered a few conferences in real-time and it definitely makes you pay attention on more than one level. Being able to put it in a cohesive manner helping people understand what's happening is an art in itself and something you do very well.
Carla Chapman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 4:49 PM

Are there unintended consequences for compulsively tweeting?  Read on....

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Can Content Curators Help With Content Overwhelm?

Can Content Curators Help With Content Overwhelm? | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Evren Kiefer for Paper.li talking about a challenge we all face - information overload and how we streamline our diet. Or can we?


"Content doesn't have a season -- the feast is all year round" Overload or gluttony?

 

Here's what caught my attention:


“Information overload”, I hear you say, “we know that already”. Is it really the problem, though?


**As Clay Shirky argues in his talk “It’s Not Information Overload. It’s Filter Failure”, information overload is our new environment of plenty and not a problem that needs solving.


****It lies upon us to create internal and external filters to manage our time and attention because they are our most precious resources.


My commentary: I think this is most important for all of us, continually refining our ability to select only what we need and leave the rest. Today everyone is a publisher and everyone has an opinion. Aren't we suffering from meaning overwhelm as well?


I think it's essential to establish some criteria when you select content?


**What are you  looking to add to the original piece?


**Do you want to  create  clarity for others?


**Do you know the subject matter well enough to do this effectively?


**Do you want it to be thought-provoking?


**Do you want to add additional links and other resources who may have different points of view?.


As far as meaning overwhelm,


Everyone has an opinion, I think it's good to have a viewpoint but I think it's important to search for the simple thread in it that relates to your core message. 


It's also good to include others in the conversation because two heads are better than one, it helps people see the bigger picture and decide for themselves. That's why I'm asking you:


What are your thoughts? How are you dealing with this? I'd love to hear your comments.


Selected by Howard Rhinegold and  Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond


Read Full article here: [http://bit.ly/wkij56]


Via Kelly Hungerford, Howard Rheingold
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Beth Kanter's comment, January 21, 2012 1:20 PM
BTW, I like how you frame the "meaning overwhelm." Even if we are power users of aggregation tools and newsmastering tools to bring us more on target content for our needs - we can still suffer from this.

It is the act of going back and forth between scanning quickly - and then going in for a deep dive and reflection. I watch the stream. I check things out and if I find something that is like "wow" - my audience would love this - or "wow" slightly different take or framing on the topic - then I add in my collection,think about it, and share.

The thing I'm trying to fight - in part because I curate many different topics. I tend to focus on different streams of keywords or sources for particular topics. But I might find something through serendipity that is on another topic I curate and it is good, but I'm not focusing on that topic now. So, sometimes I grab and have in a holding place until I look at it in more depth.

All this to ask you about:
What is your practice for curating multiple topics?
What do YOU do to avoid meaning overload?
janlgordon's comment, January 21, 2012 5:06 PM
Beth Kanter

For me, it all begins with managing my attention and establishing criteria for selecting content that aligns with my brand message and my purpose for being online. This is my compass. My focus for the day that fits this framework and everything flows from there. I love Howard Rhinegold’s work and the mindmap is brilliant. I’m finding these to be excellent resources in helping me to refine this process and I feel I'm definitely on the right track.


I have some quiet time before I ever go to the computer and focus on my agenda for the day. It’s like going into a library. Everything you could ever want is there but if you don’t have a hypothesis, you can drown in the sea of knowledge and information.

I cover lots of topics but there’s a recurring theme that connects them and it revolves around the evolving world of curation and the many forms it takes; how we have to learn to curate our selection not only of content and information but activity such as social networking as well. It's learning to manage my time and evaluate how I spend it. I ask myself if I do this, will it take me towards or away from my overall plan, the answer always gets me back to where I need to be.

As you know, we can schedule priorities and life comes charging in and sometimes I have to shift to do something that needs to be taken care of. Even if this happens, I can get back to my theme for the day at some point. I don't hold the reigns too tightly on this, it's just there to keep me grounded. If I find something as you say serendipitously and it’s off my daily plan, if it’s really a "wow", (again, here I've established some criteria for this, otherwise, I'd find many wows throughout the day), I stop and pay attention to it to see if it’s something I should work on. For me, there’s a certain rhythm to all of this and intuition plays a part. It takes practice and trusting yourself and not over-thinking things.

As for meaning overload, there are two things I will do If a piece is particularly heady or difficult to read, I will search for the simple thread that relates to the message I am seeking to put out to my audience. The other aspect is more simple. If I feel that my head is just too full, I have to step away for a few minutes, take a few deep breaths, maybe grab a drink of water. Sometimes meaning overload is just brain overload, and I really need to know when to step away and find my way back.
Kelly Hungerford's comment, January 22, 2012 5:16 AM
Thanks for sharing, Howard.