Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Covering the ongoing evolution of curation & beyond; the impact & innovation http://xeeme.com/JanGordon
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‘Content Shock’, Curation and The Golden Opportunity

‘Content Shock’, Curation and The Golden Opportunity | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
At what point does the exponential increase in content production make the cost of trying to grab and hold attention no longer cost-effective?
janlgordon's insight:

Quite a stir was made a week ago, when Mark Schaefer published his Content Shock article on the businessesgrow blog.

 

A paraphrasing of the question he asked was, ‘At what point does the exponential increase in content production make the cost of trying to grab and hold attention no longer cost-effective?’

 

The topic resonated me as well as many others and the responses were swift, including  Shel Holtz, Sonia Simone of Copyblogger and Marty Smith, the first two of which are discussed in the piece published in curatti.com (Marty’s piece was published too late to be included).

 

 

We don’t feel that Content Shock is something that any of us need to be concerned over. 

 

Let’s not forget that

 

As content continues to grow, search keeps pace by constantly improving. “

 

Semantic Search may be beyond most people now, but it will become a part of everyone’s life even if in the same mysterious way that a car engine helps that wonderful machine convey us from point A to point B.”

 

And amongst those who stand to gain from the situation are:

 

“Discerning Curators who understand the needs of their readers because they are consumers of the same content, only sharing what blows them away!”

 

… a statement which is at least partly backed up here by an end user perspective:

 

When I need to research something, I go to a few trusted sources and get what I want, when I want it.”

 

 

The message to readers is: “If someone is out there filtering the deluge of articles that you might otherwise have to work your own way through…. it removes the burden of you having to deal with the ever growing content mountain.”

 

So is Content Shock real?  With all the excellent curators and filtering tools available ....... Only for those who insist on reading every source for themselves


Reviewed and written by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering Curation, Social Business and Beyond

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janlgordon's comment, January 26, 2014 5:45 PM
Massimo, thank you, happy you liked the article
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How to Create Content that is Meaningful, Provocative and Keeps them Coming Back

How to Create Content that is Meaningful, Provocative and Keeps them Coming Back | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
The Internet is full of people sharing interesting things all day. From liking pictures on Facebook to retweeting cool articles, sharing is something everyone enjoys doing in one way or another. Yet receiving likes and retweets can seem impossible.
janlgordon's insight:

I selected this post by Dashburst because I thought the suggestions were very helpful. We read tips and strategy about how to make your content stand out everyday but the most important thing is to focus on the needs of your audience.


Here's what caught my attention:


1, Value Exchange


Listen, engage and find out the interests and what sparks the passions of your audience then provide value in these areas on a consistent basis.


2. Disruptive Ideas


People will take notice, engage with you, if you post something that challenges their understanding of the way the world works. It's a good way to stir up the dust, invite others to share their opinions. This is a great way to elevate the conversation and act as a catalyst for new ideas, ways of doing things and whatever comes next.


3. Great Story


A story becomes worth sharing if it inspires emotions, creates points of entry where people can find places where they identify with you. This is a great way to start conversations, all relationships begin there. As Simon Sinek says "“People don't buy what you do; they buy why you do it".


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering "Curation, Social Business and Beyond"


Read full article here: http://bit.ly/10w0Oe2

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janlgordon's comment, June 18, 2013 3:01 PM
Anastasia M. Ashman Great to see you, so sorry I'm late in responding, sooooooo busy, hope you're doing well!!
Pushpa Kunasegaran's curator insight, June 18, 2013 6:24 PM

So true!

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, November 14, 2013 6:23 AM

Amazing

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Curation Plays A Major Role in Successful Content Strategy - Here's Why

Curation Plays A Major Role in Successful Content Strategy - Here's Why | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This is an interesting article by Byron White, Founder of IdeaLaunch.


I love the way the author has positioned curation as a key element in content marketing strategy. He says that curation starts with the selection process of the right articles, then researching the assets of the competition.


In addition to adding context, also part of the process is learning how much content you need, how frequently to publish it and which channels of distribution, (social especially) required to capture organic market share.


Having said that, here are a few things the author said and my comments:


He says -"Who will win the content curation war of the web? The race to transform to high-quality publishing is officially on. It’s time to gather ideas, develop stories and publish quality content that keeps readers (and customers) coming back for more".


I say, I don't  think it's a war, I think it's an evolution, I think there will be many winners, it's not a race


He says, "We’ve all heard the expression Content is King. After all, content is the fuel behind the social media revolution currently sweeping the Web. Close examination of the art world, however, offers a solid case that curation, not content, may in fact be the ruler online."


I say:  I think it's a combination of both, original and curated content are both ruler online. I don't think it's either or.


What do you think?


Here's what caught my attention:


**The skill and savvy of a Content Strategist is equally as important as your Director of Marketing these days.


**Getting the right content to the right prospects at the right time is the key to content marketing success.

 

****But in the end, it’s not content that’s king. Instead, it’s the impact that the content has on us long after we pass it by.


****Great content is hard to create, curate, optimize and distribute. But when it all comes to together, it is the catalyst that makes your business better. And better than that.


Curated by Giuseppe Mauriello and Jan Gordon


[read full article http://j.mp/sPZqzu]


Via Giuseppe Mauriello, Robin Good
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Martin Gysler's comment, December 21, 2011 7:46 AM
I have downloaded the free eBook, thanks for the share!
Shirley Williams (appearoo.com/ShirleyWilliams)'s comment, December 21, 2011 10:33 AM
Nice find. Thank you for sharing.
janlgordon's comment, December 21, 2011 5:56 PM
Robin Good
This piece is excellent - thanks for sharing it!!
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Robin Good's Keen Observations on Curation, Timely and Relevant

I originally posted Howard Rhinegold's wonderful interview with Robin Good several months ago. However, as we approach 2012, I must share it again, as it seems more timely now than ever.


If you have just listened to this for the second (or in my case probably 4th) time, you will find so many things you may not have digested several months ago.


Here is just one gem that caught my attention this time:


**A group of curators create an alternative to Google "A Google for the people by the people". Instead of relying on secret algorithms, they create their own ecosystem of curated rankings where THEY decide what is relevant for them.


**Curators collaborating together - Trusted People who are gateways to relevant information for each other as they tap into each others discovery, perspectives, opinions, expertise, different points of view so they can find meaning and make sense of it and pass it on to their audiences.


**My input - this can lead to a collective intelligence that we've never experienced before.


Lots to ponder, so much to look forward to........


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"


Full interview here [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1IeOzIoRDs]

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Content Curation: Why Detecting Emerging Patterns Is Crucial?

Content Curation: Why Detecting Emerging Patterns Is Crucial? | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

Romain Goday, wrote this piece for Darwin Ecosystems I've had some great discussions with Romain and he truly understands what it takes to be a relevant curator.


He lists the top reasons why content curators need to pay attention to them.


We all know the service Content Curators provide in cutting through the noise on the Web, and new tools that are coming out will enable more and more people to become curators.


This is what caught my attention:


** Successful Curators will need the tools that enable them to latch onto new trends in their area of expertise. 


Those who are able to discern patterns and report on them in a timely manner will


***Link together pieces of the information puzzle so that others may see what had previously been missed


***Provide insights on the significance of events


***Demonstrate how those events evolve


***The emergence of patterns is a sign that something is happening


***The ability to understand and Curate new patterns and generate buzz around them, is what stands Expert Curators above the growing crowd


Romain's own takeaway is that Patterns should be the starting point for Curation.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"


Read the full article here: [http://bit.ly/sjRyc2]

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Create Dynamic Headlines to Draw Your Readers In - Here's How

Create Dynamic Headlines to Draw Your Readers In - Here's How | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
How do you get your headlines to inspire a click? I’ve created a cheat sheet that spells out nine effective tips based on the word H-E-A-D-L-I-N-E-S.
janlgordon's insight:

This article is by Feldman Creative  on a topic that is near and dear to my heart - the headline.


As we all know there's so much content flying by especially on Twitter, being able to grab someone's attention is key. Learning how to craft a headline that draws the reader in is a must.


There are great tips in here


Here are a few that caught my attention:


E is for empathy.


Jay Baer, author of the great marketing book “Youtility,” points out in social media today, your messages are delivered alongside those of your reader’s friends and family. To earn their attention and trust, you too have to achieve friend status. The best way to accomplish this is to show your reader you understand their problems and care.


"You’re Going to Love These Free Analytics Apps" 


S is for success


The oldest and most proven approach to headline nirvana is delivering a little bundle of success. Of course, you need insights into how your readers define success. When you have them, speak to them.


 "Nine Headline Tricks Sure to Boost Your Leads"


A is for ask


The question headline is enormously effective—provided you ask a question your target audience wants to know the answer to.


"How Do You Write More Magnetic Headlines?"


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering Curation, Social Business and Beyond


Read more here: [http://bit.ly/Jc464j]


Stay informed on trends, insights, what's happening in the digital world become a Curatti Insider today

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, December 10, 2013 11:15 PM

Useful list, good reminders.  And there are headline evaluators out there using the emotion principle.  Here's one:

http://www.aminstitute.com/headline/


~  Deb

janlgordon's comment, December 11, 2013 1:00 AM
Deb Nystrom Thanks for your comment and for this link, very helpful, I really appreciate it!
harish magan's curator insight, December 23, 2013 9:24 PM

As we all know there's so much content flying by especially on Twitter, being able to grab someone's attention is key. Learning how to craft a headline that draws the reader in is a must.

 

There are great tips in here

 

Here are a few that caught my attention:

 

E is for empathy.

 

Jay Baer, author of the great marketing book “Youtility,” points out in social media today, your messages are delivered alongside those of your reader’s friends and family. To earn their attention and trust, you too have to achieve friend status. The best way to accomplish this is to show your reader you understand their problems and care.

 

"You’re Going to Love These Free Analytics Apps" 


S is for success


The oldest and most proven approach to headline nirvana is delivering a little bundle of success.Of course, you need insights into how your readers define success. When you have them, speak to them.

 

 "Nine Headline Tricks Sure to Boost Your Leads"


A is for ask


The question headline is enormously effective—provided you ask a question your target audience wants to know the answer to.

 

"How Do You Write More Magnetic Headlines?"


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti coveringCuration, Social Business and Beyond


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Mix Curation With Socially Addictive Content - Here's How

Mix Curation With Socially Addictive Content - Here's How | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

My fellow curator and colleague, Beth Kanter has once again given us a wonderful post full of insights and resources.


****I also want to point out that what she has done in this article is an excellent example of providing "context" and adding depth to what she's saying. 


In this piece Beth talks about Transdisiplinarity which means literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines which you will notice, she has clearly demonstrated in this post.


Excerpt:


She says, and I agree, "This is definitely not a chicken and egg question" you have to have "socially addictive content and content curation. I agree with her, this is a powerful combination when you blend the two together!


Here's what you'll see in this piece:


**checklist on how to create valuable content from Content Marketing Institute


** 26 Tips of Writing Great Blog Content 


**How to Newsjack, which is interesting all by itself


**current events: using this as part of you content strategy.


Curated by Jan Gordon, covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"


Read full article: [http://bit.ly/ACNJik]

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Beth Kanter's comment, January 24, 2012 3:51 PM
The 23 tips for blog content is also an excellent example of curated content that is high quality.
Beth Kanter's comment, January 24, 2012 6:02 PM
Thanks for rescooping
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Curation As Story – The Importance Of Human Filters

Curation As Story – The Importance Of Human Filters | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Jeff Turner who has curated a great conversation from members of a tweetchat #tschat today.


There are many forms of curation, I think this is an excellent real life example of the many ways you can use curation to add value for others.


I agree with this, no matter what you're curating, it has to have a story that ties it together:


"Curation is a form of storytelling. Curation tools need to support this truth."


**Collecting content without qualitative human judgement is aggregation, not curation. The best automation tools alone will never replace the ability of a human being to provide meaningful context.


****And the best curation, the curation I subscribe to via email, takes context to the next level. It tells a story.


**This post is being written, primarily to serve as an example of what I’m calling “social curation.”


**The act of curating a conversation, like the one that took place this morning at #tschat, should be a storytelling act.


**every act of curation is a storytelling exercise, whether you use a tool hosted on a third-party site, like Pinterest or Storify, or whether you choose to use tools that allow you to self-host your curation.


**In the end, the story is what matters. It’s what has always mattered. Have I told a story, or have I simply collected a bunch of links?"


Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"


Read full post here: [http://bit.ly/uSxFoL]

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Beth Kanter's comment, December 27, 2011 11:49 AM
Just noticed that he used a graphic I created! Small world. Good one for my nonprofit curation list.

I really like that last question -- curation is a storytelling act
janlgordon's comment, December 27, 2011 1:06 PM
Beth Kanter -
I love that graphic:-) -

Yes, he makes alot of sense, simple, but to the point
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Content Curators Compete In Game-Like Forum While Making Newsroom Contributions

Content Curators Compete In Game-Like Forum While Making Newsroom Contributions | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This piece was posted by Tim Ryan a contributor for PSFKI thought this would be of interest to anyone who is curating content. Digg is doing something very clever and it's a whole new forum where you can contribute and curate and possibly find new audiences for your brand.


"Digg Newsrooms is a new channel introduced by the online content curator that uses bot's are all the channels by topic: http://digg.com/newsrooms


Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"


Read full post here: [http://bit.ly/uChvnH]

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Twitter (Trust) research: It's Where the Money & Action is

Twitter (Trust) research: It's Where the Money & Action is | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

Bob Brown of Network World has curated news of two very interesting Twitter research projects that caught my attention.


We all agree that freedom of speech is good,  and it's great that everyone can now  become a publisher. However, there's a double-edged sword: If we speak to a friend before we think something though, all will surely be forgiven and forgotten. After all, we all make mistakes. But if you click that Tweet or Share button too quickly, either succumbing to knee-jerk reactions or without first checking the facts, you may find the digital world to be less forgiving.


Content curators have to be especially vigilent about curating someone else's content to make sure the facts and information are correct.


I believe the research related to here is essential reading, as it is furtherment of an established and growing trend:


One relates to Wellesley College's Department of Computer Science where two professors have been awarded a near half million dollar National Science Foundation grant to:


****build an application that gauges the trustworthiness of information shared on social networks, and in particular Twitter.


This was originally envisioned as a form of spammer identification, but


****has broadened to be able to determine the past history of a tweeter and also whether information being received is available from multiple sources. 


The other brings us news of 'Tweetographer', a huge Data Mining project by two University of Cincinatti Computer Science students, descibed as:


"a real-time events guide extracted from information coming via large numbers of tweets." 


This could be available as a web or mobile app at the end of the year and one of the co-creators, Billy Clifton (his partner is Alex Padgett)


**sees the uses expanding in the future to predict election results and compiling product reviews.


My takeaways are:


**that we all need to be very aware that what we tweet today can and may be used against us in the future


**search is still very much in its infancy when it comes to engine sophistication, stay tuned.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/s00504]

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