Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Covering the ongoing evolution of curation & beyond; the impact & innovation http://xeeme.com/JanGordon
Curated by janlgordon
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Collector or Curator? Becoming a Social Connoisseur

Collector or Curator? Becoming a Social Connoisseur | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
It used to be that you were a wine or art collector to be considered a connoisseur. These curators of their personal taste and beauty would search for pieces that fit a collection they would be proud
janlgordon's insight:

I selected this article by Bryan Kramer because it absolutely speaks to me and many of you!


Today’s modern day curator is a curator of knowledge. We have come to rely on the best to tell us what is good and what isn’t. Their history of shares heightens their status in some cases to social connoisseur, a title not easily earned.


Bryan asks this question: Have you ever read something that made you stop and think... and you saved it? You're a collector. The question is, how do you move from collector, to connoisseur?


There are 5 great takeaways in this piece......


Here's what caught my attention:


Understand the Shelf Life - News will always serve a purpose, but today’s news only last seconds. To build a story around something that drives a different perspective is what drives new opinions, conversations and communities. What you share reflects on your beliefs, so add something that lasts longer than a retweet.


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering Curation, Social Business and Beyond


Read more here: http://linkd.in/1i1RNrc


Stay informed on trends, insights, what's happening in the digital world become a Curatti Insider today

 

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malek's curator insight, June 16, 2014 4:09 PM

Thought provoking article.

I had to stop and read "Goosebumps" twice, the down-to-earth notion of human touch mixed with quality content, is something to ponder and keep trying.

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How Can 'Blue Ocean Strategy' Help You Soar in 2014?

How Can 'Blue Ocean Strategy' Help You Soar in 2014? | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
Cirque du Soleil redefined “circus” creating a “blue ocean” where their value proposition could stand alone. Before Cirque du Soleil “circus” meant animals, brave performers and a nomadic tribe.
janlgordon's insight:

Marty Smith has done it again, written for Curatti a great artilcle with insights, strategy and takeaways that can literally help you to stand above the crowd.


I don't usually make these kinds of statements but after reading this more than once and (you will want to do this too), what he's saying makes perfect sense!


 “blue ocean strategy” in the book by Kim and Mauborgne. The book is an important read for Small To Medium Sized Businesses (SMBs), but practical and immediate needs may make adoption of a “blue ocean process” difficult.


Here's just a sample of what you'll find in the piece:


Start With A SWOT


Creating an honest Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) analysis for your website and 3 to 5 competitors is a great place to start a “blue ocean” search.


Create a spreadsheet - See in more depth in the article


Creating a “blue ocean strategy”


Recognize WHERE you are strong, evaluates competitor strengths and then turns all previous assumptions about your business on its head just enough to find a unique value proposition,a value proposition that exists in uncontested - see how to do this in the aritlce


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering Curation, Social Business and Beyond


Read more here: [http://bit.ly/1a6m4eS]


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Russell Yardley's curator insight, December 25, 2013 3:50 PM

Same camera, even same lens but never the same eye! 

Giuliano Rinaldi's curator insight, January 2, 2014 12:30 PM

Esci dalla mischia... NON ENTRARCI!

Alfredo Erba's curator insight, January 2, 2014 12:33 PM

Per gli appassionati della "Strategia Oceano Blu" suggerisco anche degli approfondimenti sul Business Model Canvas.

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The Science Behind Word of Mouth and Why Things Go Viral

The Science Behind Word of Mouth and Why Things Go Viral | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

Tweet About Jonah Berger is a Marketing professor at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, and author of the New York Times bestseller Contagious: Why Things Catch On.

janlgordon's insight:

Jonah Berger has written a very informative piece on what triggers word of mouth and what factors have to occur to make this happen. This appeared on the wordofmouth blog.


There are many factors that make content, a campaign, a person go viral. Lately I've become very interested in influence marketing and how that plays a role in this.


Here are some highlights:


Triggers have a big impact on human behavior


Triggers shape the choices we make, the things we talk about, and the products we buy.


For example: Playing French music at the grocery store makes people more likely to buy French wine, and playing German music makes people more likely to buy German wine.


But the best part about triggers? Anyone can apply this concept. By linking your product or idea to prevalent triggers you can help your own initiatives succeed.  


Here is a post by Marty Smith. He has written many articles but 5 of those posts went viral", or about 1% of all the posts that he wrote at that time, he took a moment to see why these went viral and what they all had in common.


Here's what caught my attention:


5 Magical Curation Tools Analysis

Let’s start by looking into why “5 Magical Tools” might have received so much social support:


  • Power Twitter Accounts are Critical to Going Viral.
  • Shorter is better (more of a gut feeling than in the data, but all 5 are on the shorter side).
  • Visuals are Important.
  • Scoop.it Plus Twitter is more powerful than either alone.


Here is the link to an intro and the article: http://bit.ly/18Dxn0q


I think Influence marketing plays a big role in making things go viral, here's an article from Forbes The 'Ws' Of Influence Marketing  http://onforb.es/1a0ss8o that talks about the importance of leveraging influencers in a niche that relates to your product or service. 


"If you understand why people talk and share, you can get the word out about any product or idea. From BtoC to BtoB. From recycling initiatives and logistics management software to political causes and new products"Jonah Berger


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering Curation, Social Business and Beyond


Read article here: [http://bit.ly/1dbOnhW]

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Tim Fernback's curator insight, October 22, 2013 6:42 PM

Great insight into why things go viral.  "Why Things Catch On" is a must read for online marketers.  Not so much about social media valuations, but an interesting read none-the-less.

Edwin Tam's curator insight, October 22, 2013 9:46 PM

Triggers. Hmmm... That's like lighting the fuse yes?

internetdoctor's curator insight, March 7, 2014 9:41 AM

Something "triggers" us to make a move.  It is something in the environment...in psychology we call it a "stimulus" that elicits a "response".  What is that stimulus that triggers so many responses in people that make word of mouth really work.  Perhaps there is a science to it...but why does Rebecca Black's Friday video have millions of views, and your YouTube video that has amazing information has 10?  Clearly Rebecca has a trigger that you and I do not have...what is it?

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How To Leverage the Science of Relationships to Gain True Influence

How To Leverage the Science of Relationships to Gain True Influence | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
If you define influence by the size of your Klout score, you can stop reading this right now. If you believe influence is driven by the creation of a re
janlgordon's insight:

This is a great article by copyblogger on how to gain true influence and the "science" behind leveraging relationships.


Here are some highlights:


*. Influence is driven by creating a relationship between two parties - where one sees the other as truly knowlegable about a prticular product or service.


* Establishing influence is a multi-step process that moves the influenced through four key stages


There is a "science" or method to doing this effectively he uses the term Propinquity - the dictionary defines this as:


Propinquity - Noun
  1. The state of being in close to someone or something; proximity.
  2. Close kinship.


There is physical propinquity and psychological propinquity - being that most of us use content to reach, engage and build relationships, he uses content creation as a means of creating influence an building trusted relationshiops.


Propiinquity theory tells us:


* the more often people see your content, the better they get to know you.


*Each time someone is exposed to your content, they are interacting with you, your thoughts and beliefs.


*This leads to a feeling of knowing you, because it mirrors how we get to know people in the real world.


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering "Curation and Social Business"


Read more here: [http://bit.ly/17jMNZs]

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Caroline Price's comment, July 16, 2013 5:59 AM
yes...some people are worthy of respect; others less so...
Therese Matthys's comment, July 16, 2013 12:34 PM
Caroline - so true!
Philippe Trebaul's comment, September 9, 2013 11:48 AM
You're all totally true. I really agree with you. I would add that "followers" are (normally, except for fake profiles...) persons. And persons MUST be respected. I agree too with you, Sigrid, concerning the fact that influence could be better mesured by interactions. Thx a lot for your reactions. It's very kind from you! Have a great week. Best regards :) Philippe
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Is Content the New Currency?

Is Content the New Currency? | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
Between the endless Euro drama and the Bitcoin brouhaha, currency has been much in the news of late. Most people would probably name the US Dollar as the dominant currency in this day and age.
janlgordon's insight:


Interesting article from Fast Company written by Geoffrey Colon.


Today the word currency is being used frequently - in this context - the new currency is content in the online world. It has particular meaning to me and many of us who curate or create content to engage, inform and build communities for a variety of reasons.


Content that has substance, informs, meets the needs of the audience gains trust - trust builds relationships, relationships can lead to commerce, communities with shared interests, knowledge networks, innovation and much more.


Here are a few things that caught my attention:


Content creates equity much like stocks and bonds. The more subject matter expertise a brand brings to the table, the more business they can create. This expertise is displayed in the form of content


Financial transactions ussed to buy status. Now, content buys earned trust.


Content has meaning beyond the data it contains. It can be shared and exchanged with others to acquire additional knowledge—much like a traditional currency.


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering "Curation, Social Business and Beyond"


Read full article here: http://bit.ly/12EYggv


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janlgordon's comment, June 19, 2013 12:38 AM
Mithu Hassan Sorry I'm so late in getting back to you - you're very welcome, happy you liked it!!
santina kerslake's curator insight, September 5, 2013 3:11 PM

Do people actually read the content? Will it keep them following you?

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Part 1: Another Look At Content Curation - What it Entails & Why it's so Valuable

Part 1: Another Look At Content Curation - What it Entails & Why it's so Valuable | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

Here's another article about content curation but is't definitely worthy of your time. It was written by Jonathan Crowe for Business2community.

 

In this two-part series, the author's  gives  an explanation of what content curation entails and how it can be a valuable tool in your content marketing strategy.

 

Summary:

 

The author covers a couple of misconceptions about curation and explains why curating third party content can help you become a trusted source and build your brand.

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

**Another way to think about content curation is comparing it to networking

 

**Members of an audience engage in a larger conversation by connecting them with the latest ideas and innovative leaders in their field

 

** it can also connect them — through comment fields, etc. — with each other.

 

My commentary:

 

**Some people ignore the comment section but this is a place where you can  monitor what your audience is thinking and feeling, while engaging in conversation with them

 

**Curation can generate internal value for your company, as well.

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering, "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [ http://bit.ly/H19Haz]

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John van den Brink's comment, March 29, 2012 3:18 PM
Jan, thank you for this scoop!
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Is it Curation or Noise Generation - Do You Know the Difference?

Is it Curation or Noise Generation - Do You Know the Difference? | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This article was written by Amber Naslund and curated by Robin Good. They have both done an excellent job. Curation is evolving and there are some things that we absolutely know to be true but the author has also left us with some great questions, definitely something to ponder.


Robin Good: Amber Naslund, at Brass Tack Thinking blog, has a great article touching on the importance of curation and on the danger of easily selling personal self-expression and serendipitous re-sharing of other people's content with true content curation.

 

An she is so damn right about this.

 

 

Here a few key highlights from her article:

 

" 1) To me – and by definition – curation requires conscious thought with the purpose of adding value, context, or perspective to a collection of things.

 

It’s deliberate work, gathering things together for a reason and lending a keen editing eye to those assets, whether it be pieces of art or pieces of writing.

 

...

 

2) Turning your Twitter feed into a clockwork-scheduled stream of all the stuff you find in your RSS feed is not curation, it’s distribution.

 

And since collecting and redistributing content is arguably easier than creating it, everyone does it.

 

Which serves to create a great deal of noise, and as we’ve lamented for some time now, it becomes increasingly difficult to separate the wheat from the chaff and home in on information resources that are consistently valuable, and favor mindful selection and sharing over optimizing a feed to populate a bunch of links and drive traffic or gain fans and followers.

 

 

3) Can curation be accomplished online? I think so.

 

But it’s rarely what we actually see happening when we immerse ourselves in social networks, and it’s not what we’re doing when we click the “share” button over and over again.

 

...

 

4) The business case for curating content has long been that you can become an expert resource for others, a trusted source of information or expertise that sets you apart.

 

But becoming a trusted source of information implies a willingness and ability to apply filters, to have exacting standards, to discern the good from the simply popular, the valuable from the gimmicked and hyped.

 

Which requires work. A lot of it.

 

Not just an app and the ability to put your collection and distribution on autopilot."

 

 hank you Amber, you are so damn right. 

 

(Jan) Here's what caught my attention - food for thought for all of us:

 

 **How do we preserve the value of some content over other content?

 

**Is there value in having to work a bit to find the good stuff, or is greasing the skids for the flow of content always the best possible scenario?

 

**If everyone is a curator or a distributor, how must our tools and thinking continue to evolve to help us find the curators of the curators?

 

**How do we continue to evolve our valuation of resources and information?

 

 Insightful. 9/10


Full article: http://www.brasstackthinking.com/2012/02/curation-saturation-and-why-we-might-need-information-friction-after-all/  

 

(Image credit: http://Streetfilms.org) 


Via Robin Good
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Marc Lucas's comment, February 17, 2012 12:47 AM
Guilty as charged, I should know better, I preach from the gospel of adding value! Thank you for the nudge towards addressing my own case of "builders' syndrome" (Customers get great new extensions, kitchen refits and bedroom refurbishments but Chez Builder remains in sore need of some redecorating, new gutters and more!). Thanks, Robin.
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What is Content Curation?

What is Content Curation? | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
I selected this piece by Dino Joannides for Lingospot because it tackles a much asked and frequently tackled answered of "What is Curation?" in the most appropriate manner possible. That is to say, he answers the question with an excellent example of curation, complete with multiple links to articles that prove his points.


Some points that caught my attention:


**Content curation means different things to a variety of stakeholders, be they journalists, editors, bloggers, business executives or marketers.


**Fred Wilson the Venture Capitalist and blogger sees curation as an essential element in today's media landscape as indicated by one of his posts here

.

**Some argue that curation could actually save media.


**Others have argued that there is a new type of curation that is in effect the New Search.


**Most people inadvertently already act as curators whenever they decide to post a link or video to their social networks to show their friends they have found great or topical content.


He closes by suggesting traditional editors make decisions based only upon content that was produced internally, whereas the newer Curation mixes this with external content. The determination of what is given prominence remains the same.


The difference is that now, this role is undertaken by professional journalists, content marketers, bloggers" or in reality, anyone that publishes online".


What do you think?


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"


Read full article: [http://bit.ly/w81bwP]

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Robin Good's comment, January 20, 2012 12:49 PM
Thank you Jan, excellent work, as always.
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4 Guaranteed Ways To Extend the Life of Your Content Online

4 Guaranteed Ways To Extend the Life of Your Content Online | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This post was written by Jonathan Houston for Memburn blog. Whether you're creating or curating content, there are some excellent suggestions to keep your content moving through multiple social channels and not disappearing into the thin air.


Excerpt:


"The almighty Google itself has proclaimed that fresh, relevant copy is like catnip for the king of the search jungle. In addition to search, it is what every successful site needs.


**But how long does copy remain fresh?"


Here are a few things that caught my attention:


**The subject of the content should be something that features in many searches


**Link to domains that carry authority on your subject matter. You as the author need to give Search Engines some reference points so that they can learn to trust you


**Write for your audience, not the mainstream. Speaking to your niche may make your audience smaller, but it will make your content more relevant


**Use your social networks to share your content. The more your content is shared, commented on, liked or asked for more information on the better it will do.


The bottom line is, "If visitors continue to interact with your content, it will remain forever young."

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"


Read the full article: [http://bit.ly/tq538x]

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Here's How to Use Selfies to Boost Your Social Media Marketing

Here's How to Use Selfies to Boost Your Social Media Marketing | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
After Ellen Degeneres took that photo that time, everyone's been keen to get in on the Selfie trend - but there are a few things to consider before implementing a selfie campaign.
janlgordon's insight:

I selected this piece from social media today because as an active member on social media platforms, I have seen the power of selfies and when used appropriately how they can immediately get your audience involved with your brand.


Here are a few tips that caught my attention:


You need to know your audience and what they’ll respond best to, rather than simply tagging onto the latest trend.


Selfies have the power to encourage self acceptance and boost people’s confidence. In order to use them best, in a marketing sense, these are the elements you should keep in mind.


Helping people feel good about themselves is a great way to enhance your brand community, and used intelligently, selfies can play a significant part in spreading a positive brand message.


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering Curation, Social Business and Beyond


Read more Here: http://bit.ly/1kLY1b4


Image: Ellen Degeneres - Academy Awards 2014


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janlgordon's comment, May 7, 2014 5:20 PM
Malek, thanks for your comment, yes Dove among many others are doing great things involving the audience using selfies
Hirinuca's curator insight, June 16, 2014 6:15 PM

Bonne page de curation via @ janlgordon

SNMinc WebGems's curator insight, May 20, 2015 10:16 AM

"There is definitely opportunity within the selfie trend, but brands have to establish the best way to realize it, what will resonate with your target consumers."

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Create Dynamic Headlines to Draw Your Readers In - Here's How

Create Dynamic Headlines to Draw Your Readers In - Here's How | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
How do you get your headlines to inspire a click? I’ve created a cheat sheet that spells out nine effective tips based on the word H-E-A-D-L-I-N-E-S.
janlgordon's insight:

This article is by Feldman Creative  on a topic that is near and dear to my heart - the headline.


As we all know there's so much content flying by especially on Twitter, being able to grab someone's attention is key. Learning how to craft a headline that draws the reader in is a must.


There are great tips in here


Here are a few that caught my attention:


E is for empathy.


Jay Baer, author of the great marketing book “Youtility,” points out in social media today, your messages are delivered alongside those of your reader’s friends and family. To earn their attention and trust, you too have to achieve friend status. The best way to accomplish this is to show your reader you understand their problems and care.


"You’re Going to Love These Free Analytics Apps" 


S is for success


The oldest and most proven approach to headline nirvana is delivering a little bundle of success. Of course, you need insights into how your readers define success. When you have them, speak to them.


 "Nine Headline Tricks Sure to Boost Your Leads"


A is for ask


The question headline is enormously effective—provided you ask a question your target audience wants to know the answer to.


"How Do You Write More Magnetic Headlines?"


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering Curation, Social Business and Beyond


Read more here: [http://bit.ly/Jc464j]


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, December 10, 2013 11:15 PM

Useful list, good reminders.  And there are headline evaluators out there using the emotion principle.  Here's one:

http://www.aminstitute.com/headline/


~  Deb

janlgordon's comment, December 11, 2013 1:00 AM
Deb Nystrom Thanks for your comment and for this link, very helpful, I really appreciate it!
harish magan's curator insight, December 23, 2013 9:24 PM

As we all know there's so much content flying by especially on Twitter, being able to grab someone's attention is key. Learning how to craft a headline that draws the reader in is a must.

 

There are great tips in here

 

Here are a few that caught my attention:

 

E is for empathy.

 

Jay Baer, author of the great marketing book “Youtility,” points out in social media today, your messages are delivered alongside those of your reader’s friends and family. To earn their attention and trust, you too have to achieve friend status. The best way to accomplish this is to show your reader you understand their problems and care.

 

"You’re Going to Love These Free Analytics Apps" 


S is for success


The oldest and most proven approach to headline nirvana is delivering a little bundle of success.Of course, you need insights into how your readers define success. When you have them, speak to them.

 

 "Nine Headline Tricks Sure to Boost Your Leads"


A is for ask


The question headline is enormously effective—provided you ask a question your target audience wants to know the answer to.

 

"How Do You Write More Magnetic Headlines?"


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti coveringCuration, Social Business and Beyond


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Do You Know Why Old Content is the King of Content Marketing?

Do You Know Why Old Content is the King of Content Marketing? | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
You don't need more content. You need old content. I know, that's not what you usually hear, so stick with me and we will look at some numbers to see why it is so important.
janlgordon's insight:

Eric Whittlake has written a very important article about your old content - if it's relevant it produces results.


Here are a few highlights that caught my attention:


"Better content isn’t enough when your competitors have good old content"


Here’s how the 29 first page results break down:


  • Only 6 are current pages (content from within about the last month or fixed pages for this year, such as current award pages)
  • 8 are between 1 month and 1 year old.
  • 15 of the first page search results are for pages that are more than a year old

More than half of the search results were for content that is more than a month old, and less than 25% was for current content!


Increased Site Traffic


Not only does old content continue to capture search traffic, the library of content you have created over the years will become a key driver of traffic and growth. This is the real reason why it takes calendar time for your inbound or content marketing program to deliver on its full potential.


Does this mean quality doesn’t matter? Promotion doesn’t matter? Design doesn’t matter? Video doesn’t matter? Of course it still matters!


Everyone can, and will, follow the content marketing advice of the day. But old content is the one thing you cannot just create. It doesn’t matter how impatient you are, it takes time for your content to age.


Jan Gordon: Takeaway - We all know that there are many creative ways to repurpose old content, in addition to all the benefits in this article. Building on the collection of treasures you already have gives you plenty of amunition to create content that informs, invites commentary, drives discussions, builds relationships and communities.


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering Curation, Social Business and Beyond


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/154BVZ1]

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Albert Green's comment, September 11, 2013 9:43 AM
Although the idea is very interesting, I don't see any valid arguments that OLD content is the key to high rankings. You even can't say there's a correlation here because 14/30 pages are less then 1 year old and 16/30 are more than 1 year old.
The method for determining OLD website is also faulty since the age of domain is not the same as the age of the content itself. So if the page has been updated within this year, it should be labeled as new. To my mind, 90% of the TOP10 search results pages have been updated during last year, so this would mean that NEW content is the key to high rankings.
And since this is just a hypothesis, I must present an actual trend that has been spotted by SEO specialists recently. After latest Google Search engine updates, fresh content easily wins over old content with a lot of backlinks. If OLD content was the king, there would be NO fresh content (up to 1 month old) on first page at all.
Karen Tracey McCarty's curator insight, January 30, 2014 12:07 PM

Some things we know are better with age, like wine and wisdom, but content? Seriously? Read on to see stats showing why your old content can be a power horse for generating increased site traffic and search results.

SBESSCPA's curator insight, February 12, 2014 2:40 PM

Do something with your old data -- turn it into website and social media content.....

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How to Create Content that is Meaningful, Provocative and Keeps them Coming Back

How to Create Content that is Meaningful, Provocative and Keeps them Coming Back | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
The Internet is full of people sharing interesting things all day. From liking pictures on Facebook to retweeting cool articles, sharing is something everyone enjoys doing in one way or another. Yet receiving likes and retweets can seem impossible.
janlgordon's insight:

I selected this post by Dashburst because I thought the suggestions were very helpful. We read tips and strategy about how to make your content stand out everyday but the most important thing is to focus on the needs of your audience.


Here's what caught my attention:


1, Value Exchange


Listen, engage and find out the interests and what sparks the passions of your audience then provide value in these areas on a consistent basis.


2. Disruptive Ideas


People will take notice, engage with you, if you post something that challenges their understanding of the way the world works. It's a good way to stir up the dust, invite others to share their opinions. This is a great way to elevate the conversation and act as a catalyst for new ideas, ways of doing things and whatever comes next.


3. Great Story


A story becomes worth sharing if it inspires emotions, creates points of entry where people can find places where they identify with you. This is a great way to start conversations, all relationships begin there. As Simon Sinek says "“People don't buy what you do; they buy why you do it".


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering "Curation, Social Business and Beyond"


Read full article here: http://bit.ly/10w0Oe2

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janlgordon's comment, June 18, 2013 3:01 PM
Anastasia M. Ashman Great to see you, so sorry I'm late in responding, sooooooo busy, hope you're doing well!!
Pushpa Kunasegaran's curator insight, June 18, 2013 6:24 PM

So true!

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, November 14, 2013 6:23 AM

Amazing

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Content Curators are the New Superheros of the Web

Content Curators are the New Superheros of the Web | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

Steven Rosenbaum has an interesting article on Fast Company, outlining the reasons why curation is here to stay and the importance that curators will play in your information consumption diet.

 

He writes: "...So anyone who steps up and volunteers to curate in their area of knowledge and passion is taking on a Herculean task.

 

They're going to stand between the web and their readers, using all of the tools at their disposal to "listen" to the web, and then pull out of the data stream nuggets of wisdom, breaking news, important new voices, and other salient details.

 

It's real work, and requires a tireless commitment to being engaged and ready to rebroadcast timely material.

 

While there may be an economic benefit for being a "thought leader" and "trusted curator," it's not going to happen overnight.

 

Which is to say, being a superhero is often a thankless job.

 

The growth in content, both in terms of pure volume and the speed of publishing, has raised some questions about what best practices are in the curation space."

 

He also has some pretty straightforward advice on what, as a curator, you should never do:

 

"1. If you don't add context, or opinion, or voice and simply lift content, it's stealing.

 

2. If you don't provide attribution, and a link back to the source, it's stealing.

 

3. If you take a large portion of the original content, it's stealing.

 

4. If someone asks you not to curate their material, and you don't respect that request, it's stealing.

 

5. Respect published rights. If images don't allow creative commons use, reach out to the image creator--don't just grab it and ask questions later."

 

And he definitely has a point on all of these. 

 

Recommended. 7/10

 

Read the full article: http://www.fastcompany.com/1834177/content-curators-are-the-new-superheros-of-the-web?partner=rss 


Via Robin Good
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Jonathan Rattray Clark's comment, April 18, 2012 1:14 AM
Scooping it .........thanks Robin I really like your curation .... And value your wisdom ......it seems there is purpose to my constant information minning as and educator artist and passionate information collector .......I find it incredibly exciting to find fresh thinking and response to the living world around us and in particular our individual passions. Thank you for your wisdom
Robin Good's comment, April 18, 2012 1:16 AM
Thank you Jonathan. Glad to be of help and inspiration to you.

Tony Gu's comment, April 20, 2012 1:30 AM
I am really enjoying reading this article.
I found that the way Robin Good curate this article truly practice the ‘No Stealing’ rules. Thanks for sharing this with all of us. Big up!
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Marketers Must Become Curators to Help Internet Users Who Are Drowning in Data

Marketers Must Become Curators to Help Internet Users Who Are Drowning in Data | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it


This piece was written by Jean-Paul De Clerck for Selligent. I selected it because it reconfirms what we already know as consumers of content and as content marketers trying to reach their audiences.  


Magnify's  "Digital Lifestyle" research shows that it's becoming more difficult for so-called professional web users to:


**cope with the stream of communication and


**to distinguish essential information from less important information.


A massive tidal wave in figures


**64% of the participants said that the information they receive had increased over 50% in comparison to the previous year


**Nearly 73% of the respondents described the information overload with superlative terms souch as a "roaring river" or a massive tital wave


It is simply becoming more difficult for people to filter information. And it's very important to realize that this is not caused by technology only, and that it will not be solved by technology.


**In their interactions with consumers and customers, companies have a responsibility to make it as easy and valuable as possible for people.


Here are some takeaways:


**Simplify your cross-channel messaging: improve and personalize your communication


**Marketers must ensure that their messages are targeted and synchronized.


**They should avoid overlapping communication and marketing fatigue. Read white paper 


**They should also let people choose their own communication channels more.


**Provide alternatives, because people will increasingly search for them in their quest for coping with information.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/x46IR4]


Curatti was founded to address this issue and much more. Please visit us at our fan page.

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Pinterest leads content curation boom

Pinterest leads content curation boom | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
This piece was written by Mia Pearson.for The Globe and Mail.

 

To say Pinterest is growing quickly is an understatement.

 

Brands have opportunity to capitalize on new sites that celebrate online content in a personal way and Pinterest leads content curation boom

 

Here are a few highlights:

  

**According to a report from Shareaholic, Pinterest now drives more referral traffic than YouTube, Google+ and LinkedIn combined.

 

**It recently became the fastest website to attract more than 10 million unique monthly visitors.

 

**Time magazine named it one of the 50 best websites of 2011 and Techcrunch named it the best new startup of 2011.

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond

 

Read full article here: [http://www.theglobeandmail.com/authors/mia-pearson/]

 

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janlgordon's comment, February 10, 2012 6:05 PM
Shinya Sakemoto Thank you for this piece, I really appreciate it.
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Is Content Curation Stealing or a Shrewd B2B Marketing Practice?

Is Content Curation Stealing or a Shrewd B2B Marketing Practice? | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

This very timely article was written by Andrew Hunt, founder of Inbound Sales Network, for Business2Community.

 

It raises an issue between original Content Creators, Content Curators and people who repost these articles.

 

Commentary by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"

 

The reason I was moved to do this commentary is because I see a wonderful opportunity to come together as a community and help shape the future of curation. Content Curation is in its infancy and there’s a lot of misunderstanding about its potential. As I see it, it’s a brilliant B2B marketing strategy for anyone who is selling a product or service if done responsibly.

 

Content Curators are providing a very valuable service for the original author and their own audiences.

 

 

Here is what ethical, responsible curators are providing for content creators:

 

1. Syndicating content and introducing it to new audiences, which is excellent PR if it is being curated by a “trusted source”

 

2. A good headline grabs the attention of a reader and gets them into the piece quickly. A curator who can tailor the headline to grab their audience will inevitably send more traffic to the original article

 

3. A curator who is skilled at adding commentary and context to the original piece also broadens the audience of the original work

 

4. Curation is one of the building blocks of collective intelligence

 

5. If a curator fully accredits both author and article, authors might have a whole new area of exposure/distribution channel that they wouldn’t have had before

 

6. People get paid to market and open up new business for brands. Curators do this free of charge while building their own audience. Each party gains. It is a new and exciting form of symbiosis in business

 

 

I know that there are people out there who are just taking people’s work. I have spent time adding commentary only to find it has been published on Facebook and other sites without giving credit to me or the original author. They use it for their own gain but I think and hope this will become more the exception as Curation matures.

 

I like many of my colleagues are building our brands and want to be known for selecting only the best content that informs and educates our audience. We want authors to want us to curate for them and feel that we’re working in concert not on opposing teams. We want them to be happy that we're taking the time to find the essence in what they’re saying and take it to a whole new audience. It is a part of our job to bring authors to the attention of people who would not otherwise know of them.

 

 

This was a Q & A at the end of the original article in Business2Community:

 

(q) How is content curation different from stealing?

 

(a) Great question! Part of the genesis of Aggregage was my experience with “curators” who would take my content, put it on a page with no link or a link that had an anchor tag that said “link” or something similar. They would change the title and URL for my post on their site. The goal of that person was to get SEO value from my content.

They also allowed commenting on their sites. The reason I would write the post is for people to find me and my content and to engage with me in conversation.

These types of curators were definitely taking away from that. Aggregage takes a very different approach. Our goal is to be THE launching point out to all the great content getting created on particular topics. We specifically do not have pages that compete with the original source. We only show snippets.

We provide full links with the original title. We don’t have commenting on our site. Basically, we are doing everything we can to get readers to go to the original source and engage with the content. Many of the participating bloggers find that we become the second biggest referral source behind Google search.

 

 

My take is that we're still in the early stages of curation and while I understand resentment to curators who do not fully attribute their work. However, it is incorrect to assume that changing headlines and URLs automatically means that people are stealing your work strictly for their own gain. That's not how this works with people who are serious about curation.

 

The end goal  and my vision is for us to build community and broaden the audience of the content producers who we promote while building a niche audience of our own who trust that we are cutting through the noise to bring them the few articles they will hopefully find relevant. My community is the authors whose work I curate, the audience I bring their work to and other curators. I appreciate and nurture each relationship equally.

 

There are so many of you who could add brilliant insights, would love to hear your thoughts.

 

Read the original article: [http://bit.ly/u89c95]

 

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janlgordon's comment, November 28, 2011 4:30 PM
@bethkanter
Would love to meet you in NY! In the meantime, let's do connect next week and start the conversation, really looking forward to it, lots to talk about:-)
Liz Wilson's comment, November 29, 2011 3:17 AM
Jan, Thank you for this commentary - I completely agree with you. I would also emphasise that a curator must (in my opinion) take responsibility for ensuring what is curated is true/honest/accurate/fair, which involves thoroughly checking the source article's credibility.

Great piece - thanks again.
janlgordon's comment, November 29, 2011 1:08 PM
@Liz Wilson
Thanks for your comments. I absolutely agree with everything you said here.
Rescooped by janlgordon from The Evolving World of Marketing
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Before You Post Remember "Timing Maximizes Engagement" - (infographic)

Before You Post Remember "Timing Maximizes Engagement" -  (infographic) | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

Adam Covati - Founder of Argyle Social shares some very important information for marketers -timing is everything, as the old saying goes.


**Before you post anything, make sure you know when your audience is online and which networks they're on.


Social media marketing: timing maximizes engagement (infographic)...


He’ll talk about measuring, managing, and monetizing social media.Get everyone on the same page


His first piece of advice is to   “Get everyone in marketing on the same page."


**Use the same platform. Aggregate your efforts in one place and use consistent web analytics or third party tools.


**Once you’re organized, you can really measure things and then you can figure out how to do more of what’s working.”


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article here [http://bit.ly/vDTJkN]

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