Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Covering the ongoing evolution of curation & beyond; the impact & innovation http://xeeme.com/JanGordon
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How to Make Your eCommerce Business Successful

How to Make Your eCommerce Business Successful | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
The success or failure of any eCommerce business venture depends on detailed planning and preparation. Here are 5 key elements in that process
janlgordon's insight:

I selected this article from Curatti written by Mark Thomasson because it provides several methods on how to be successful in generating more sales for your eCommerce website.

 

Detailed planning and preparation will help you drive more customers online.

 

Run a Successful eCommerce Website

 

When building a business online you want to prepare the same way you would for a brick and mortar one. I agree that in order to attract customers you need to include cohesive elements.

 

Thomasson shows the right elements that need to be in place in order to have a sales generating website.

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

  • Once you grasp the attention of your visitors with a mixture of eclectic content you can attract more leads for future sales. Includes stories from your target market along with original photos.

 

  • Include creatively written descriptions with a major line of products for more sales. Use tracking tools to measure your results.

 

  • There are a variety of commerce platforms to choose from for your business. Ready-made options can help you get started right away.

 

Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering Curation, Social Business and Beyond

 

Image: Courtesy of 123rf.

 

Read full article here: http://ow.ly/e9dF307VlWI

 

Stay informed on trends, insights, what's happening in the digital world become a Curatti Insider today

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Txus Santos's curator insight, February 6, 1:57 AM
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The Curated Web

The Curated Web | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it

Brittany Morin wrote this piece for the Huffington Post


I thought this was good article, great observations and a real grasp on curation and how to do it effectively. I'm going to refrain from reposting all the gems in this post  and instead give a commentary on something she said which I thought was a bit shortsighted.  


Here's what caught my attention:


"I believe that the people best poised to be curators of the Internet are those from the Facebook Generation -- the first generation of native web citizens, mainly people in their 20s or early 30s who have grown up with the web and can navigate, scour, synthesize and then publish the best of what's out there on a daily basis because they practically live online. It is our generation that will also be able to more easily understand where new opportunities lie because they can quickly pinpoint where the gaps are in content, services, and products."


My response:


She is right that people in their 20's or 30's are indeed well equipped to curate the web especially for their own age group as well as others for all the reasons she states.


Having said that, there are people of all ages who have been on the web for years, myself included, who have built relationships and have the ability to spot trends, gaps and potential opportunities. I seriously doubt that people in that age group know what people in their 40's, 50's & 60's might need in a trusted source or have access or the ability to ferret out every potential opportunity on the web. I would be careful about making global statements like that.


**What if people of all ages contributed to a topic together, can you imagine the collective intelligence that could come from that?


What will set a good curator apart from a person who just aggregates links is the context they can add.  Their perspective will have been gained through the humility and wisdom of life experience and can add great richness to the original content.  To be sure, I have met many wonderful GenYers who have these traits in abundance, but this is one area where a few extra years and a few extra miles can help.


Content is the new currency of the web, it is meant to be a door opener, to invite others into the conversation, building thought leadership and authority. The more people that contribute by giving comments or adding another level of context, not only does it add to our knowledge but it can build community.


I think there is an enormous opportunity for anyone who has the passion, knowledge expertise and committment to select the very best content, fact check for accuracy and is willing to put in the time to learn how to curate succesfully.


Commentary by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://huff.to/v7bGHt]

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Ove Christensen's comment, November 17, 2011 4:03 AM
Quality curation is not based on age gruoups but on engagement, openness, knowledge, context and a lot of other stuff - but claiming that a curators age is something of particular interest is rubbish to me.
janlgordon's comment, November 17, 2011 11:53 AM
Hi Ove, As you know I agree with you - curation is moving towards "collective intelligence" it's a wonderful time to expand our knowledge, build community and who knows what lies beyond the horizon.
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The Human Cost of Social Connectivity

This wonderful piece was written by Brian Solis, who never disappoints, he continually sheds light on what we need to focus on. There are times when you feel something and it's not until someone articulates it that shapes your thoughts and helps you stay on course.

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

"Social media is influencing and reshaping all it touches. But there are very real costs associated with social media and they extend well beyond technology, popular networks, trends or monumental events.You are here because you live and breathe new media and with each day that passes, you place unprecedented value on social and mobile networks and the role they play in your livelihood.

 

Your experiences are incredibly personal, but are also influenced by your connections. The value you glean from each network is directly correlated to the relationships you forge within each network. The content that you curate, create, and consume dictates the focus and significance of your interest graphs.

 

The gravity that attracts people and information to your egosystem is essentially yours and only yours to define. And, that’s the point of this post. We must study the human cost of social media to improve how it is we adopt and employ it in life, study, and work.

 

Aside from the inherent value of connections, engagement, and information commerce, understanding the human cost tied to social networking will help us focus precious resources to prioritize desired benefits and outcomes."  My input **Priceless

 

"Without ambition, desire, and focus, social media is a recipe for chaos. Through all of the distractions and fatigue, we must continually renew our focus to bring important goals to life based on our actions and words in each social network."

 

http://www.briansolis.com/2011/09/the-human-cost-of-social-connectivity/

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What Comes First The Customer, or Marketing and Innovation?

What Comes First The Customer, or Marketing and Innovation? | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
Focusing on customers to the exclusion of everyone and everything else can kill a business just as easily as neglect.
janlgordon's insight:

This article is from Digital Tonto and I selected it because it was thought-provoking and something we as marketers and innovators should pay attention to.


Here's what caught my attention


“The customer is always king” has long been a time-honored business adage.  Peter Drucker, the most renowned management thinker of the 20th century, was probably best known for advocating a consumer-centric approach.

 

A lot of the confusion stems from a misunderstanding of what Drucker actually said, which was:

 

"the purpose of business is to create a customer, the business enterprise has two–and only two–basic functions: marketing and innovation. Marketing and innovation produce results; all the rest are costs".

 

 The truth is that a successful business must balance the needs of a variety of stakeholders.

 

Focusing on customers to the exclusion of everyone and everything else can kill a business just as easily as neglect.

 

 The Stupidity of Crowds


 "The ability to make distinctions between smart and dumb crowds can be the difference between a runaway success and unequivocal disaster"

Digital Tonto


There’s a reason why people like Henry Ford and Steve jobs don’t like listening to customers—customers are a crowd and crowds are often stupid.

 

They usually represent the conventional wisdom of the present, rather than the possibilities of the future and following them often leads to mediocrity, not excellence.

 

That’s why truly visionary entrepreneurs make their fortune from betting against the crowd.  They create something new, something nobody is asking for because they’ve never seen it before.  It’s difficult to “start with the customer” when one doesn’t exist yet.

 

Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering Curation, Social Business and Beyond


Read more here: [http://bit.ly/1kMjtf5]

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janlgordon's comment, December 15, 2013 11:40 PM
Marty Koenig, Thank you Marty! You are so right, if we keep talking to each other and following popular trends, it's very possible that we will miss the boat. .
Charles Rein's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:15 PM

The Idea of the Customer comes first, then the plan to pull them into your market

Ray Beauchamp's curator insight, December 28, 2013 4:23 PM

"the purpose of business is to create a customer, the business enterprise has two–and only two–basic functions: marketing and innovation. Marketing and innovation produce results; all the rest are costs".

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A Look Back (And Ahead) At Social Media's Impact

A Look Back (And Ahead) At Social Media's Impact | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it



Great piece written by one of our digital leaders, Toby Daniels. He is the CEO of Crowdcxentric & founder of Social Media Week which has been taking place all week in Los Angeles, tomorrow is the last day.


Here's what caught my attention:


So, what’s next?


We’re currently witnessing a global shift in how we connect and communicate. At a macro level the major pillars of our societies – economies, governments, industries – are all experiencing mass disruption because of social media. And out of this mass disruption has emerged a new generation of digital leaders who, I believe, are helping to build a new network of human intelligence on a global scale.


This new network will function as the infrastructure on which everything will be built in the future – and Social Media Week’s goal is to understand how it’s evolving, what the emerging trends are, and how this will impact people, commerce and society on a global scale.


This applies to companies across all verticals. In 2011, we're going to see businesses that have social media fully integrated into their business models begin to take a much bigger stake of their respective markets.


http://www.forbes.com/sites/ciocentral/2011/09/22/a-look-back-and-ahead-at-social-medias-impact/

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Music - Interest Graphs = Commerce = Transactions The Next Wave!!

Music - Interest Graphs = Commerce = Transactions The Next Wave!! | Curation, Social Business and Beyond | Scoop.it
From the article - So What comes After Social Commerce? Gigaom

I'm highlighting this paragraph from the article, this is curation and beyond, great post, gets the juices flowing for all you entrepreneurs who are music fanatics!!

At its very core, the interest graph is a way to organize a social network based on people’s interests. For instance, if you’re a fan of Charlie Sheen and Lindsay Lohan, it’s clear self-destructive Hollywood stars and their lives are what you’re interested in. The interest graphs are built through various mechanisms: by following people whom you deem as experts, through your likes and shares, etc. In the middle part of the last decade, we tried to do this through tags.

http://bit.ly/kSB4wh
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