Content and Curation for Nonprofits
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Content and Curation for Nonprofits
Nonprofits struggle with finding the time to create content, but the secret is repurposing, reimagining and curating
Curated by Beth Kanter
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The Top Five Reasons Why Your Readers Aren’t Sharing Your Content

The Top Five Reasons Why Your Readers Aren’t Sharing Your Content | Content and Curation for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

Sometimes trying to get people to share your content feels like pulling teeth.

 

If you’re finding that your content isn’t being shared, these are most likely the reasons why:

 

1. You only talk about yourself

Everyone has been around constant self-promoters before—they aren't fun to talk to. Part of the reason they aren’t interesting is because they don’t involve you in the conversation.

To increase your site’s shareability, start addressing the topics your readers want to learn and talk about. People will then view you as a resource and be more likely to promote you.
*The Golden Rule prevails here: talk about others as much as you would like them to talk about you.


2. You pick topics that aren’t timely

In the age of the 24/7 news cycle, the pressure is always on to write timely content.

People like to share content that is relevant to what’s going on in their community at that moment, not content that was “so two days ago.”

*Use an editorial calendar to help plan out your post schedule and ensure your posts are timely.


3. Your headlines aren’t catchy

You don’t have to have gimmicky headlines, but you need to them to be interesting and relevant enough to capture the small attention span of your audience. Keep your headlines less than eight words to make them punchy and memorable, just like your favorite tweets on Twitter.

*See the criteria for a great headline: It’s exclusive and specific. Keeping your headlines short and sweet will make it much easier for your readers to share your content


4. You write huge blocks of text

Now that everyone is used to reading online, people have tiny attention spans. Most people want to scan your post before reading it so they don’t waste their time reading something that isn't relevant to them.

*Having a few bullet points with multimedia will help your readers take home the main messages and easily share them with others.


5. You don’t make it easy to share

Do you have sharing buttons in an easy-to-use location on your site? Choose the right social media sharing buttons for your audience and place them where your audience can easily see them.

 

Ginny Soskey -- http://bit.ly/LLCwWX

Source: http://bit.ly/NdQNfl


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Mapping Your Mix: Are Your Providing the Right Mix of Content?

Mapping Your Mix: Are Your Providing the Right Mix of Content? | Content and Curation for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

Selected by Debra Askanase

Summarized by Beth Kanter


A summary of a survey of nonprofits and their content strategy characteristics from Idealware and NTEN.    What caught my eye:  Most nonprofits are not curating, but creating original content.     How does this limit network or community building?   

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Pinterest, Tumblr and the Trouble With ‘Curation’

Pinterest, Tumblr and the Trouble With ‘Curation’ | Content and Curation for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

Curated by Beth Kanter
http://www.bethkanter.org 


This is a fun essay about visual addictions or "life style yearning" that is what we see mostly on sites like Pinterest and Tumblr.  It isn't curation as the author points out:


Not everyone buys into this, of course. Here’s The Awl’s co-editor, Choire Sicha, for instance, on the subject of rebloggers who fancy themselves curators: “As a former actual curator, of like, actual art and whatnot, I think I’m fairly well positioned to say that you folks with your blog and your Tumblr and your whatever are not actually engaged in a practice of curation. Call it what you like: aggregating? Blogging? Choosing? Copyright infringing sometimes? But it’s not actually curation, or anything like it. . . .” To which a commenter added: “My Tumblr isn’t so much curated space as it is a symptom of deeper pathologies made manifest.”

“Curation” does imply something far more deliberate than these inspiration blogs, whose very point is to put the viewer into an aesthetic reverie unencumbered by thought or analysis. These sites are not meant (as curation is) to make us more conscious, but less so.

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The Unanticipated Benefits of Content Curation

My posts on content curation: http://www.bethkanter.org/category/content/...
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Beth Kanter's comment, July 14, 2012 1:06 PM
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Hubert Cosico's comment, July 17, 2012 11:42 AM
This is great stuff Beth. Thank you for sharing.
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Curation: How the Global Brain Evolves

Curation: How the Global Brain Evolves | Content and Curation for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

Found this link via gdecugis while exploring links connected to the announcement of the new dashboard for scoop.it (http://blog.scoop.it/en/2012/07/07/visualizing-the-interest-graph/).  


The article starts with a quote that has been shared on social channels, that I tweaked:


“Those who can, curate. Those who can’t, review. Those who can’t review, tweet. Those who can’t tweet retweet.”


It gets at the point that Robin Good makes over and over again - curation is not sharing!


The article is getting the notion that curation is becoming a networked activity.  Here's the paragraph that stood out for me;


“Content curation is the natural evolution of our globally-networked consciousness. This sounds like a bunch of hippie drivel, but we really are creating a global brain, of sorts, by encoding human knowledge and tracking human activity. Using the human nodes of this network to strengthen some of these connections while weakening others (by choosing either to pass along i.e. ‘curate’ information or not to pass it along) helps this global brain function better as a system, which in turn increases its power whenever any of us need to tap into it. ..... When we curate, for whatever reason and in whatever form, we are enhancing a connection in the global neural network we are inadvertently creating.”








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Guillaume Decugis's comment, July 9, 2012 2:19 PM
@Scott - The idea in the article is that curators pass ideas in a similar manner to neurons and synapses in the human brain, forming a global brain. An idea which isn't new but which could be taking shape with the Internet, social media and... curation.
JKingston's curator insight, October 6, 2013 5:44 PM

Big idea - collective consciousness

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Understanding the Value of Curation for Education: Nancy White

Understanding the Value of Curation for Education: Nancy White | Content and Curation for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

I thought the author was another Nancy White who also does visual facilitation and works in the area of development.    But it is another Nancy White who works on education. 


I like how she relates curation to the Blooms Taxonomy (the triangle diagram in the article) and how curation is a higher level of thinking/learning - requires synthesis and evaluation, not just classifying. 


Robin Good has more:


---------------

Robin Good: What does curation mean from an educational viewpoint? And what is the key difference between "collecting" and "curating".

Nancy White (@NancyW), a 21st Century Learning & Innovation Specialist and the author of Innovations in Education blog, has written an excellent article, dissecting the key characterizing traits of curation, as a valuable resource to create and share knowledge. 


She truly distills some key traits of curation in a way that is clear and comprehensible to anyone.


She writes: "The first thing I realized is that in order to have value-added benefits to curating information, the collector needs to move beyond just classifying the objects under a certain theme to deeper thinking through a) synthesis and b) evaluation of the collected items.


How are they connected?"


Excellent definition. 


And then she also frames perfectly the relevance of "context" for any meaningful curation project by writing: "I believe when we curate, organization moves beyond thematic to contextual – as we start to build knowledge and understanding with each new resource that we curate.


Themes have a common unifying element – but don’t necessarily explain the “why.”


Theme supports a central idea – Context allows the learner to determine why that idea (or in this case, resource) is important.


So, as collecting progresses into curating, context becomes essential to determine what to keep, and what to discard."


But there's a lot more insight distilled in this article as Nancy captures with elegance the difference between collecting for a personal interest and curating for a specific audience. 


She finally steals my full endorsement for this article by discretely inquirying how great a value it would be to allow students to "curate" the domains of interest they need to master.


Excellent. Highly recommended. 9/10


Full article: http://d20innovation.d20blogs.org/2012/07/07/understanding-content-curation/ 



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Beth Kanter's comment, July 8, 2012 1:22 PM
I especially like how she used the Bloom's Taxonomy and related that to curation.
Stalder Angèle's comment, August 1, 2012 3:56 AM
Thank you for this scoop!
Shaz J's comment, August 5, 2012 10:39 AM
Thanks for this!
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Content Creator vs Content Curator: Is Social Media Sharing The Same Thing as Content Curation?

From Beth:  You have to do both!   

Nonprofits have limited time for curation - it is change to find ways to curate that are efficient - but not just retweeting.


------------------

Robin Good: Interesting discussion and video: is social media sharing equivalent to "curation"?

Is it more important to create or to curate? 


"The SalesChaosTV guys, Dan Waldschmidt and Todd Schnick, bounce around content curation vs. content creation as means to an end in social media marketing today."


"Content creation or content curation? Are you a curator if you are retweeting the content of others?

Should you be retweeting it at all if you haven’t read it?"


Good points being made. 8/10


Video URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8TS1sDiYjno&feature=player_embedded 

Original article: http://socialmediatoday.com/saleschaostv/562939/content-curation 
 


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Beth Kanter's comment, June 23, 2012 2:16 PM
Will go read this, but what was the answer?
Robin Good's comment, June 24, 2012 12:56 AM
Hi Beth, the answer is not clear-cut and the discussion needs to go on.

Social sharing, according to some, is a light form of curation, but to me the argument doesn't hold up, as curation is not determined by the sharing act, but by the purpose with which you collect and bring together information items that inform, or solve a problem on a specific topic for a specific audience.
Eric Moran's curator insight, December 22, 2012 11:05 AM

Great point made here on both sides of the issue.

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Content Curation As an Autonomous Collective Process That Shapes Our Global Networked Consciousness

Content Curation As an Autonomous Collective Process That Shapes Our Global Networked Consciousness | Content and Curation for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

Robin Good: I agree. Curation is an autonomous process of collective intelligence, where you and me, and all the others who sift and select from the ocean of information passing through them, unconsciouly help our global brain, to make sense of the information we have ourselves created.


Even those who simply like, share or retweet, contribute to this process, by gradually filtering and marking what is most interesting and relevant to them.


Evolver.fm writes on Wired: "There’s too much stuff. We can help each other find it. This is what the age of curation is about.


Yes, it’s amusing to make fun of people who seem to retweet other people’s links all day, but that’s giving all of those retweeters and Likers too little credit by far.


What they’re really doing is strengthening connections in the global brain, in much the same way the axons and dendrites in our brain grow and lose connections to shape our minds."


"Content curation is the natural evolution of our globally networked consciousness.


This sounds like a bunch of hippie drivel, but we really are creating a global brain, of sorts, by encoding human knowledge and tracking human activity.


Using the human nodes of this network to strengthen some of these connections while weakening others (by choosing either to pass along i.e., ‘curate’ information or not to pass it along) helps this global brain function better as a system, which in turn increases its power whenever any of us need to tap into it.


...


When we curate, for whatever reason and in whatever form, we are enhancing a connection in the global neural network we are inadvertently creating."


Insightful. 7/10


Full article: http://www.wired.com/underwire/2012/07/curation/ 



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Tina Stock's comment, July 6, 2012 11:15 AM
Robin - thanks for the excellent commentary. I always appreciate your posts!
Robin Good's comment, July 6, 2012 11:47 AM
Thank you Tina, much appreciated.
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Visual Content Marketing: Capture and Engage Your Audience

A reminder that content is going visual.   This is an excellent deck.  Most useful slide:  The six different types of visual content:


Comics
Memes

Infographics

Photos

Videos

Visual Notetaking


Is your content strategy going visual?  

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Pinterest Nonprofit Benchmarking with Pinerly

Pinterest Nonprofit Benchmarking with Pinerly | Content and Curation for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

Some thoughts on Nonprofits and Visual Curation using Pinterest and Pinely data

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How To Start Curating News: Approach and Tools Advice by Jay Palter

How To Start Curating News: Approach and Tools Advice by Jay Palter | Content and Curation for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

A big hat tip to Robin Good for selecting and curating this useful piece.  I've been looking for basic advice on content curation - the discovery part and adding your view for Networked Nonprofit/Social Media workshops.  I have been teaching brand monitoring 101, but content curation is similar in the discovery phase.     I like his broad categories.

 

Beth Kanter
http://www.bethkanter.org 

 

 

--------------

Robin Good: If you are new to news curation and are looking for some basic advice on how you can start finding good content out there and where/how to promote it, you will find this introductory guide by Jay Palter quite useful.

 

In it there is some good basic advice on what kind of free tools and approaches you can start using to monitor specific topics as well as proper suggestions on how to characterize and add value to your curation work.

 

Good for getting your feet wet. 7/10

 

Full article: http://jaypalter.ca/2012/05/19-ways-to-curate-great-financial-content/ 


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Beth Kanter's comment, June 2, 2012 12:46 PM
Thanks for this - been looking for a beginner guide for some NGOs I'm working with in India are just getting started with social media/content strategy. This a useful article for them to read.
Jay Palter's comment, June 2, 2012 2:35 PM
Thanks for the feedback and sharing, Robin. Appreciate your inspiration and support.
Robin Good's comment, June 2, 2012 2:48 PM
Thank YOU Jay!
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Visual Boards To Curate Your Learning Topics: Learni.st

Robin Good curated this resource and it is exactly the curation tool I've been dreaming of - a visual way to curate content for learning.

 

 

Here's what Robin wrote about this:

 

 

Heiko Idensen reports in his curated newsradar "Online Curating & Social Learning Tools and Applications": "Learnist is a new pinboard where users can organize their learning materials. It resembles Pinterest except that Learnist is just for sharing learning resources.

 

The website is still in beta but looks really very promising for both teachers and students.

 

Here is a set of the main features that Learnist offers to its users :

It is free Itis easy to use It has a user friendly interface It lets users create pinboards around a certain topic Users can create different boards and invite others to collaborate on them It lets you pin images,videos, and text to your boards with a single click from Learnist bookmarklet Users can also upload resources to their  boards using URLs

Free to use.

 

Try it out: http://learni.st 


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Beth Kanter's comment, May 25, 2012 11:58 AM
OMG, I think I died and went to heaven .. I'm going to check this out right away - it is exactly what I had hoped to use pinterest for.
Beth Kanter's comment, May 25, 2012 12:03 PM
Bummer, it is invite only - but requested one - hopefully won't take too long - looks like a great tool for trainers and teachers
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Making Connections on Social Networks - Live Discussions - The Chronicle of Philanthropy- Connecting the nonprofit world with news, jobs, and ideas

Making Connections on Social Networks - Live Discussions - The Chronicle of Philanthropy- Connecting the nonprofit world with news, jobs, and ideas | Content and Curation for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

Online chat with Idealware and NTEN about content curation strategy research results and discussion about content curation for nonprofits.

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Why Curation Will Transform Education and Learning: 10 Key Reasons

Why Curation Will Transform Education and Learning: 10 Key Reasons | Content and Curation for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

This is an article by Robin Good, selected and curated by Nancy White (the other one who works in the education sector).    The article is one of those longer pieces that Robin writes on on MasterMedia that pulls together the best posts and key themes.    I love these articles that Robin writes like this because if you carve out time to read it in depth, following the links, you can get up to speed on a topic or area quickly.


Many of these points apply to nonprofits as well.  Hmm ...



Nancy's summary:


"Content curation will play a major role both in the way we teach and in the way we educate ourselves on any topic. When and where it will be adopted, it will deeply affect many key aspects of the educational ecosystem.

 

In this article, Robin Good idenfies and describes 10 key factors that are coming together at this point in time that may dramatically change the education landscape:

 

1. An Overwhelming Abundance of Information Which Begs To Be Organized

2. A Growing Number of "Open" Teaching / Learning Content Hubs

3. Constantly Changing Information

4. Real-World Info Is Not Held Inside Silos

5. Fast-Food Info Consumption in Decline

6. Job Market Changing - New Skills Needed

7. Alternative Certification Systems Emerging

8. Teachers Can Curate Their Textbooks

9. Educational Marketplace Open to Thousands of Competitors

10. Demand for Trusted Guidance

 

Robin explains, "Curation fits in as a more appropriate approach to learning and to prepare for real-world work challenges, by allowing learners to construct meaning by having to research and to understand and to create new relationships between different information-elements."

 

I agree.

 

Robin further explores the impact on higher education, and the possibility that we are experiencing a "higher education bubble."  Very interersting thought. To ride out this storm Robin suggests institutions  "rapidly upgrade their role and function to where they can still provide a valuable and in-demand service to both society and individuals. One of these he suggests is to become...

 

"curating human guides, training future curators - by cultivating and supporting the development of skilled information-guides and coaches that possess the skills of a curator and those of a great story-teller." 

 

Immediately I thought...this is what librarians do!

 

Excellent article!

 

 



 



 


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Going Meta: Content Curation Techniques in Action by Robin Good

Here is a great example of how Robin Good Curates.  He noticed this video that Howard Rheingold has spotted.  Howard was curating it because of the focus on concept maps and creating insights.    Howard wrote:


(Video) Concept mapping with a group can be a powerful exercise in augmenting collective intelligence -- Howard

 

 

"An animated presentation about concept mapping. Focuses on how groups can employ the technique as a tool for collaborative planning and problem solving".


Now, go look at how Robin curated this video.  He did NOT just do a re-scoop.


Here's what he did:


1.)  Viewed the video to see how it relates to his scoop.it on curation and indicated the exact part of the five-minute video that explains content curation


2)  He retitled his scoop to support his point - that the making information into knowledge is what the curator does.


3)  He thanked the curator who originally found the clip - gave attribution to the person selected it.



http://curation.masternewmedia.org/p/2214228953/content-curation-from-information-to-knowledge-video?_tmc=qgpFTf6P-j0OG9yUhKbmoh2kBA1BuwWogZjsBN-aSwU






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Robin Good's comment, July 23, 2012 1:18 AM
Thanks Beth.

P.S.: A possible overlook "he did simply do a re-scoop"
Beth Kanter's comment, July 23, 2012 2:31 PM
Hi Robin, thanks for catching that! Sort of a funny typo, don't you think? That is the essence of what you did - you didn't just click a button - you added value for your audiences. Thanks again for being a great role model for all of us who want to learn better curation skills.
Robin Good's comment, July 23, 2012 4:04 PM
Thank you Beth, for going "meta" and showing the process. Great move. Great job.
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What are the Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for content curation programs?

What are the Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for content curation programs? | Content and Curation for Nonprofits | Scoop.it
Guillaume Decugis's answer: I think one should look at (i) the quality of one's curation work and (ii) how well this translates in building a qualified audience for you and (iii) how this converts into measurable benefits for your brand (NB: small...
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Comprehensiveness, Context and Presentation Are The Three Keys To Effective Curation in Journalism

Comprehensiveness, Context and Presentation Are The Three Keys To Effective Curation in Journalism | Content and Curation for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

My Take:   I used to joke that content curators used to be called journalists.  But if nonprofits truly want to reap the benefits of content curation (increased staff expertise and reduced information overload) - not to mention the value of curation as part of your content strategy - than following the practices outlined in the article are very very very important.


Of course, the push back is "It takes so much time."    But by slowing down, reading and putting it into content will also make one more efficient because they are more informed.


Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org



Original Curation of this piece:

Robin Good: I agree and I have said it before: Curation has nothing to do with personal expression or sharing nor with collecting links, tweets or blog posts that you may find interesting.


Curation is all about "taking care" of something in the sense  of helping someone "else" be able to dive in and make sense of a specific topic, issue, event or news story. It is about collecting, but it is also about explaining, illustrating, bringing in different points of view and updating the view as it changes.


Adam Schweigert captures the essence of it elegantly: "...[curation] it almost certainly involves broader responsibility than just tracking a big story and putting together a Storify of how it unfolded.


It’s more than blogging a daily roundup of the stories our audience cares about but our publication is not going to do original reporting on.


It’s more than becoming the Twitter account that people look to because we’re not afraid to retweet our competitors if they have a story that matters to our followers before we can report it ourselves.


Naturally we should continue to do all of those things as well, but I would argue that it is important that would-be curators of news go at least one step further.


Part guide and collector, part interpreter, part researcher, part archivist, the curator of news does all of the above:


a) collects and organizes information,


b) places it in a broader context,


c) mines the archives to surface bits of historical information, advances our understanding of the story and the driving forces behind it and, perhaps most importantly,


d) takes care to ensure that a story is properly maintained and told in the best possible way for our audience to take it in.


...


Curation is not really about reducing costs and operating more efficiently (although aggregation certainly is).


Curation is about taking care to ensure that our audience has the best possible information, context and presentation for that information."


Rightful. 8/10


Full article: http://adamschweigert.com/towards-a-better-definition-of-curation-in-journalism/ 


(Image credit: heyjude.wordpress.com)


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Looking for Content Curation Tools? Here's Where To Start: The Official Content Curation Tools Universe Map

Looking for Content Curation Tools? Here's Where To Start: The Official Content Curation Tools Universe Map | Content and Curation for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

This is Robin Good's comprehensive curation tools map!   Robin has put together smaller select lists for beginners - http://www.mindmeister.com/134633604/best-news-curation-tools-for-independent-publishers-the-newsmaster-toolkit-by-robin-good-2012 and http://www.mindmeister.com/134760952/news-content-discovery-tools-2012-by-robin-good


But nonprofits and others always appreciate the comprehensive, well curated and classified list.  This is it!


---------------

Robin Good: Everytime I see a new post or article claiming to list the best content curation tools I know I am in for some disappointment.


Most of these lists just pick up names from other lists without even bothering to check, test or verify what these tools actually do, whether they are still available. Unfortunately the rush to put out "curated" list of tools and services has created more misinformation than useful lists. 


But if you, like me, are on the lookout for new and effective tools to curate your own content or the one of your customers, I have created a comprehensive map of all the curation tools available online and I keep it fresh and updated almost on a daily basis.


The map presently lists over 250 content curation tools which you can navigate much more easily than it was possible on my earlier versions of this map.


On the right side of the map you will find all of the news and content curation tools available online today. On the left side, you can find bookmarking, link lists builders, clippers and lots of tools to operate with RSS feeds (which are still at the heart of a curator's job).

Full map: http://bit.ly/ContentCurationUniverse  

Share it. 


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Mike Ellsworth's comment, October 10, 2012 10:23 PM
Mala, thanks for the reScoop and many thanks to Robin Good for the crazy good mindmap!
Mike Ellsworth's comment, October 10, 2012 10:23 PM
Mala, thanks for the reScoop and many thanks to Robin Good for the crazy good mindmap!
sanhdyuhjue's curator insight, January 4, 2013 8:23 PM
Hello there, You have done an incredible job. I will definitely digg it and personally suggest to my friends. I am sure they’ll be benefited from this web site.<a href="http://downjustforme.com/"; rel="dofollow">is this site down</a>
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Content Curation Tools For Brands

Content Curation Tools For Brands | Content and Curation for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

Therese Torris suggested me this her interesting and long article. Excerpted from it:

 

"Content curation help brands increase their visibility and their customer engagment. 

- Content curation does help content discovery.

- Social content curation fosters customer engagement.

- Corporate curation tools help create a competitive advantage.

- But content curation is no panacea for failing content creation.

 

Most of us do “curate” content in that we collect, filter, edit, and re-dispatch online information related to the topics that are relevant to our friends and followers. We want to become the go-to person for our target audience on the topic we curate.

 

Content curation is much more than content aggregation. A brand curator handpicks the content that matches the interests of his target audience: He/she filters it to keep only the best. He/she also possibly edits and comments it, before posting the curated result on multiple media.

 

The emphasis is on “partly”: curation tools assist curators, they don’t do away with them as people able to make intelligent judgments about which content adds value to which topic and its audience.

 

***Content Curation Delivers Visibility and Engagement

a) visibility:

By organizing their content around topics shared with their audience, brands active on social curation sittes increase their chances to be discovered in a relevant context.

 

b) engagement:

Content curation does not only bring visibility, it also fosters customer engagement by adding external quality content that adds:

- Relevance;
- Unique content;
- Fresh content;
- Optimized content;
- Rich media;
- Trust;
- Entertaining content..."

 

The original article is analyzed with more information and with examples about different content curation tools. 

I thank Therese to mention me as her favorite curator. Thank you so much!

 

Read full article here: http://return-on-clicks.com/index.php/2012/06/content-curation-for-brands/

 

Check out also her presentation:

http://www.slideshare.net/ttorris/content-curationtoolsforbrands

 


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The Bastardization of the Term Curator and What Museum Curators Think of It

The Bastardization of the Term Curator and What Museum Curators Think of It | Content and Curation for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

MUST READ:



Robin Good: "A throwdown about the term "curator"". This is the title that Suse Cairns gave to her recent article, in which she opens by writing: "Lately, questions about the bastardisation of the term curator have been emerging around the blogosphere.


The Hermitage Museum wrote An Open Letter to Everyone Using the Word ‘Curate’ Incorrectly on the Internet, and Digital Transformations recently asked whether DJs are curators, and vice versa.


Their opening volley caught my attention:


"The word ‘curator’ gets used liberally these days to talk about stuff people do on the web. But does that devalue the term?


Is there any way what someone does on Facebook is comparable to the years of training and knowledge which goes into curating collections in museums and galleries?"


I believe that if Suse Cairns had the opportunity to see the real work that goes into professional content or news curation, she would not hesitate an instant in recognizing how skilled and experienced a person must be, in several disciplines, to even consider attempting doing such a job.


On the other hand, I can't but agree with her colleagues who are pulling their hair in disgust when they see people proudly "picking" and republishing other people content "as is" while defining themselves as "curators".


I must also convene with her complaining colleagues that curation has little or nothing to do with personal expression and social sharing, two reputable and valuable activities, which can be carried out with similar tools, but which require very different skills and time, and which have very little in common beyond the immediate surface. 


If one does not look or pay attention at these small details it is very easy to get caught into misleading generalizations (content curation is useless, etc.).


I am actually pointing to this article, not so much for the good effort that Suse Cairns to reconciliate traditional museum curators with the new self-acclaimed content curators, but for the excellent series of comments that her short article did spark.


Among them, I have excerpted this little gem from Suse herself: "I’m reading Stephen E. Weil’s Rethinking the Museum, and there is a section that seems entirely appropriate to this discussion.


On page 53, Weil discusses the work of John Cotton Dana, and writes “In his 1917 book The New Museum, Dana urged that museums of the future make a special effort to attract the young and to interest them in making collections of their own – collections that they might ultimately share with the public. This development of the collecting habit, he wrote:


“...with its accompanying education of powers of observation, its training in handiwork, its tendency to arouse interests theretofore unsuspected even by those who possess them, its continuous suggestions toward good taste and refinement which lie in the process of installing even the most modest of collections, and its leaning towards sound civic interest through doing for one’s community a helpful thing – this work of securing the co-operation of boys and girls, making them useful while they are gaining their own pleasure and carrying on their own education, is one of the coming museum’s most promising fields.”"


With this idea in mind, maybe this idea of collecting or “curating” online – even if it were only simple list-making – can be seen as an interesting, useful and positive thing."


Inspiring. Sense-making. 9/10


Read the full article and ALL the comments here: http://museumgeek.wordpress.com/2012/04/15/a-throwdown-about-the-term-curator/ 


Via Robin Good
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suse cairns's comment, October 13, 2012 3:05 AM
Hi Robin. I've held off on responding to this, but when it was rescooped today I decided that I would write in to chat about your interpretation of my initial post. It was not actually my original intention to "reconciliate traditional museum curators with the new self-acclaimed content curators", nor was I dismissing professional content "curation". Instead, I was speaking to the evolution in the nomenclature; to the fact that the word 'curator' is now being used widely beyond the borders of the museum sector, much to the chagrin of many within it. In fact, I was arguing that if people like yourself, professional content curators, want to use the term 'curator' to describe themselves, then that was a positive thing - something that not everyone in my sector would (or did) agree with. Your interpretation of my initial post is understandably coloured by your own perspective, but this also means you are reading into the discussion things that were not necessarily there.
Robin Good's comment, October 13, 2012 3:11 AM
Thanks Suse for your kind comments and for sharing your thoughts on this. As I have written there is plenty of good things you have written in your article, and our ability to understand and make meaning out of newly explored grounds like this one, is enriched by not having everyone agree and see things in the same way.

I am still thankful to your post which provided lots of valuable insight and some good sparks for extra discussion.
suse cairns's comment, October 14, 2012 3:32 AM
Fantastic to hear. One of the most enjoyable and interesting things about the Internet, I think, is the space it makes for conversation across all kinds of boundaries; sparks for discussion indeed. It's those new connections, across spaces, that open up room for new kinds of thinking and understanding.
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#SMMStandards Progress and Roadmap: Marklein and Paine Present the First Social Media Measurement Standards at the Dublin Summit - The Measurement Standard: Blog Edition

#SMMStandards Progress and Roadmap: Marklein and Paine Present the First Social Media Measurement Standards at the Dublin Summit - The Measurement Standard: Blog Edition | Content and Curation for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

A big topic is what metrics are valid for social media. A working group of measurement professionals has been debating this as part of developing standards. Here's the report.

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Content Curation Can Inform, Engage Customers

Content Curation Can Inform, Engage Customers | Content and Curation for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

Hat tip to Decugis for finding this data


Interesting data on how marketers see curation as a way to drive thought leadership, develop brand visibility and boost SEO.


The Study also touches upon what marketers see as challenges blocking them from doing more Content Marketing. Time is clearly an issue high on the list together with the ability to create original content.


Interesting results (also measuring progress between 2011 and 2012).


Via Guillaume Decugis
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Ginny Dillon's comment, June 5, 2012 8:05 PM
Need more hours in the day :) Thnx!
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Infographic: How Does Content Curation Fit Into the Nonprofit Conte...

Curated by Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org



This is an infographic of content strategy for nonprofits that comes from the NTEN and Idealware.  The study looks how nonprofits are using different channels - curation, creation, or promotion or community building.   Interesting stat: 80 percent use channels for content creation, with limited effort devoted to other uses.


The NTEN Journal in June is entirely devoted to content curation and includes an indepth article about this study (and one from yours truly)


hat tip to the Froggy Loop blog for selecting this resource


SlideShare:  http://www.slideshare.net/annanten/infographic-how-does-content-curation-fit-into-the-nonprofit-content-mix



NTEN Journal (need to register to get issue)

http://www.nten.org/ntenchange



Froggy Loop Description of Infographic:
http://www.frogloop.com/care2blog/2012/6/4/infographic-how-content-curation-fits-into-the-marketing-mix.html 


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Pinning Our Lives: Pinterest and Beyond

Pinning Our Lives: Pinterest and Beyond | Content and Curation for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

My good friend and colleague, Aliza Sherman has this gorgeous slide deck about pinterest and how individuals are using it for self-expression.   The deck is not just eye candy, includes some great tips and tools as well.   

 

 

Curated by Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org

 

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Capture, Annotate and Organize Content Into Collages, Books or Flows with Surfmark

Capture, Annotate and Organize Content Into Collages, Books or Flows with Surfmark | Content and Curation for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Surfmark is a new content curation service introducing some innovative and forward-looking features.

 

Surfmark in fact provides not only standard capabilities to easily capture, collect and organize content from any web page, but it adds intelligently alternative display formats to allow the exploration of such collections in multiple ways.

 

Another key innovative feature of Surfmark is its ability to generate bibliographies and summaries of content collections.

 

Surfmark allows social collaborative curation, history of all edits made, and the ability to share publicly or keep a collection private.

 

Collections can be downloaded in PDF or text formats and all pages saved in a collection are fully preserved with all the formatting and links intact so that you can refer back to exactly what you saw. 

 

Free to use. 

 

FAQ: http://blog.surfmark.net/surfmark-help/ 

 

Try out and more info: http://www.surfmark.com/ 

 

(thanks to Ana Cristina Pratas for discovering this) 


Via Robin Good
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Beth Kanter's comment, April 26, 2012 11:49 AM
Could be so useful for research for curriculum development