Contemporary Philsosophy
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Nassim Taleb on Fragility and Antifragility | The Daily Capitalist

Nassim Taleb on Fragility and Antifragility | The Daily Capitalist | Contemporary Philsosophy | Scoop.it
Nassim Nicholas Taleb is, as my readers know, my favorite contemporary philosopher. He has come out with a new book, Antifragile: Things That Gain from

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Xaos's curator insight, December 12, 2012 3:16 AM

Some made the mistake of thinking that I hoped to see us develop better methods for predicting black swans. Others asked if we should just give up and throw our hands in the air: If we could not measure the risks of potential blowups, what were we to do? The answer is simple: We should try to create institutions that won’t fall apart when we encounter black swans—or that might even gain from these unexpected events.

Fragility is the quality of things that are vulnerable to volatility. Take the coffee cup on your desk: It wants peace and quiet because it incurs more harm than benefit from random events. The opposite of fragile, therefore, isn’t robust or sturdy or resilient—things with these qualities are simply difficult to break

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Physicist Lawrence Krauss: God is a byproduct of your hard-wired narcissism

Physicist Lawrence Krauss: God is a byproduct of your hard-wired narcissism | Contemporary Philsosophy | Scoop.it
the “Science Technology Future” conference in Melbourne, Australia last month, theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss was asked whether spiritual experiences could ever be scientifically validated. “The spiritual things — the exotic phenomena people experience — in general violate the things we know to be correct on the basis of experiment, so they’re highly likely to be wrong,” Krauss answered. “I can’t say to someone who’s heard God in their ears that they’re not hearing God,” he continued. “But I can say that it’s much more likely that they’re hallucinating, based on what we know.”
John Sebastian Cumpston's insight:
Personally, I don't understand how quantum entanglement solves the problem of contingency; that is why is there anything at all. God may be a byproduct of homosapiens' cognitive limitations and a narcissistic projection, as Feuerbach proposed in the 19th century, but the idea that the universe exists uncreated, contingent, unnecessary, without rhyme or reason is just as problematic as the theological proposition.
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Lawrence Krauss - Can Spiritual Experience be Scientifically Validated?

Can spiritual experience be proven? No, things can only be falsified... validated? well... Lawrence Maxwell Krauss (born May 27, 1954) is an American theoretical physicist and cosmologist...
John Sebastian Cumpston's insight:
Spiritual experience does not need to be confirmed as true in order to be valid. It is a necessary aspect of Neanderthal-Cro-Magnon consciousness to instinctively impute magical causes in the order of things. Spirituality, magical thinking, has been with us since the dawn of man. It cannot be discarded.
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