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Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from iGeneration - 21st Century Education
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Study Reveals Fascinating Possibilities for Video Gaming and Brain Development and Repair

Study Reveals Fascinating Possibilities for Video Gaming and Brain Development and Repair | Contemporary Learning Design | Scoop.it
Early Brain Development and Gaming: A New Study on Neurogenesis and Brain Connectivity Could a recent study by neuroscientist Simone Kühn reveal new ways of

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
James J. Goldsmith's insight:

From the article:  “The benefits of gaming not only boost early life brain development – but they could extend to decelerating the degenerative span of the brain in mature life.”  I guess it’s time to load up Call of Duty…

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Chris Martin's curator insight, February 24, 10:42 AM

This is really exciting. The sooner mainstream culture accepts technology helping--in all aspects of a child's life--the better.

David W. Deeds's curator insight, February 25, 9:15 AM

Great, but we gamers knew this all along! 

Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from Eclectic Technology
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Learning and the Brain- A few quick facts

Learning and the Brain- A few quick facts | Contemporary Learning Design | Scoop.it
What do we and don't we know about the brain? It used to be that we thought we knew it all. Well, maybe not all. But, over the last couple decades new research reveals and debunks some of our previ...

Via Beth Dichter
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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, October 12, 2013 1:56 AM

Thanks for this valuable reference.

Γιώργος Παπαναστασίου's curator insight, October 12, 2013 4:52 AM

Η γνωστική ψυχολογία και οι νευροεπιστήμες έχουν αναδείξει τη σημασία των γνωστικών και μεταγνωστικών δεξιοτήτων  που λαμβάνουν μέρος στην μνήμη εργασίας, στην πορεία για τη  μάθηση.

Mary Cunningham's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:05 PM

This is part of the post on infographics as well, but is interesting enough to have a link just in its own.

Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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13 Reasons Your Brain Craves Infographics [Infographic]

13 Reasons Your Brain Craves Infographics [Infographic] | Contemporary Learning Design | Scoop.it
This is downright spooky. It's an interactive infographic all about why your brain craves infographics. Food for thought!

Via Gust MEES
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ghbrett's curator insight, July 23, 2013 8:49 AM

As the old saying goes: "A picture is worth a thousand words." This also reminds me of Malcomb Gladwell's book, "Blink." Amazon: http://amzn.to/13AalVQ

Andrea Remmert's curator insight, July 31, 2013 1:41 AM

It's all about images now. 

Bruce McDuffee's curator insight, August 20, 2013 2:53 PM

It's important to keep in mind your audience and how the ideal prospect likes to consume content.  Scientists or engineers for example my consume or respect different media than consumers of clothing or electronics.

Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from Eclectic Technology
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5 Practical Learning Tips Based On How People Do--And Don't--Learn

5 Practical Learning Tips Based On How People Do--And Don't--Learn | Contemporary Learning Design | Scoop.it

"There has been a large body of work in neuroscience, psychology, and related fields offering more and more insight into how we learn.

Below are five of the top tips from Barbara Oakley, Professor of Engineering at Oakland University, who has faced her own learning challenges (failing middle and high school math and science classes), and has made a study of the latest research on learning. She is also offering a free online course, Learning How to Learn, which starts August 1 on the Coursera platform with co-instructor, Prof. Terrence Sejnowski, a computational neuroscientist at UC San Diego and the Salk Institute."


Via Beth Dichter
James J. Goldsmith's insight:

Five practical and sometimes infrequently used ideas to enhance learning.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 30, 2014 6:02 AM

Are you interested in learning how to learn? This post provides 5 tips that may help you.

1. Get enough sleep to de-toxify your brain

2. Outwit procrastination with the Pomodoro technique

3. Use spaced repetition to remember key facts

4. Use recall rather than re-reading to see whether you’ve learned the content

5. Vary learning/studying environment

Each of these is explained in more detail in the post.

As teachers we are also learners, and it is never too late to become better at learning. Sharing these five tips with our students may help them become better learners. And if this is a topic of interest to you, consider checking out the Coursera course Learning How to Learn that will begin on August 1st.

Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from Eclectic Technology
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Brainy Approaches to Learning | Students at the Center

Brainy Approaches to Learning | Students at the Center | Contemporary Learning Design | Scoop.it

"We know that each student is unique, but what about each student's brain? This new Students at the Center infographic draws on the research from Mind, Brain, and Education to depict the brain science behind student-centered approaches to learning."


Via Beth Dichter
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Yasemin Allsop's curator insight, July 17, 2013 2:23 PM

What about, the learning processthat drawn by pupils.. thats interesting way of entering their minds...

Lia Goren's comment, July 20, 2013 7:18 PM
I loved it! thank you
Tony Meehan's curator insight, August 2, 2014 1:36 PM

Nice infographic of how the brain works in the context of learning. New technology, new understanding of brain science and psychology can and must lend themselves to the creation of a critical pedagogy which leaves no child left behind.

Rescooped by James J. Goldsmith from The 21st Century
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Problem-Based Learning: Our Brains Abhor Cliffhangers

Problem-Based Learning: Our Brains Abhor Cliffhangers | Contemporary Learning Design | Scoop.it
Our brains don't like unresolved issues, writes El Paso Schools IT director Tim Holt. Problem-based learning offers cliffhangers that keep students engaged.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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