Consumption Junction
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Consumption Junction
Consumerism meets marketing; who & what manipulates the free market of goods & services. See also: http://www.kitsch-slapped.com/category/ze-big-mouth-promotions-stuff/
Curated by Deanna Dahlsad
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Black-and-White Thinking in our Social Worlds

Black-and-White Thinking in our Social Worlds | Consumption Junction | Scoop.it

The figure/ground illusion shows how we literally cannot see two different things in the same set of stimuli. This feature of psychology generalizes to how we see people.


...One of the interesting things about human social psychology is that, in many regards, we tend to over-simplify stimuli in our social worlds - seeing things that could be conceptualized as complex and nuanced as simple and categorical. For instance, in many ways, we divide people into the category of “on my team” or “not” per the powerful ingroup/outgroup phenomenon (Billig & Tajfel, 1973). Quickly and automatically, people divide folks into these categories - and research has shown that we treat people very differently if they are in our (psychologically constructed) group or not.

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Where you get your news depends on where you stand on the issues

Where you get your news depends on where you stand on the issues | Consumption Junction | Scoop.it
Justin, you write, "Facebook was a source of political news to roughly as many people as local TV was." Pew reported, "Panelists were asked whether they got news from each of the 36 sources (plus local television news) over the past week, and while...

Via Jocelyn Stoller
Deanna Dahlsad's insight:

And there's more:


"But the data also shows there are differences in social media usage along ideological lines. Those in the middle of Pew’s ideological breakdown got news on Facebook most often — 53 percent of them in the past week, higher than both consistent liberals (49 percent) and consistent conservatives (40 percent). But while those in the middle may get their news there, those on either end of the spectrum are more likely to shape their Facebook experience with politics in mind. They’re more likely to “like” or follow an issue-based group (60% of consistent liberals and 46% of consistent conservatives, versus 33% of those in the middle). They’re also more likely to follow a political party or elected official there (42 percent of consistent liberals and 49 percent of consistent conservatives, versus only 29 percent of Facebook users as a whole)."

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Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, October 22, 2014 11:15 PM

And there's more:


"But the data also shows there are differences in social media usage along ideological lines. Those in the middle of Pew’s ideological breakdown got news on Facebook most often — 53 percent of them in the past week, higher than both consistent liberals (49 percent) and consistent conservatives (40 percent). But while those in the middle may get their news there, those on either end of the spectrum are more likely to shape their Facebook experience with politics in mind. They’re more likely to “like” or follow an issue-based group (60% of consistent liberals and 46% of consistent conservatives, versus 33% of those in the middle). They’re also more likely to follow a political party or elected official there (42 percent of consistent liberals and 49 percent of consistent conservatives, versus only 29 percent of Facebook users as a whole)."

Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, October 22, 2014 11:16 PM

And there's more:


"But the data also shows there are differences in social media usage along ideological lines. Those in the middle of Pew’s ideological breakdown got news on Facebook most often — 53 percent of them in the past week, higher than both consistent liberals (49 percent) and consistent conservatives (40 percent). But while those in the middle may get their news there, those on either end of the spectrum are more likely to shape their Facebook experience with politics in mind. They’re more likely to “like” or follow an issue-based group (60% of consistent liberals and 46% of consistent conservatives, versus 33% of those in the middle). They’re also more likely to follow a political party or elected official there (42 percent of consistent liberals and 49 percent of consistent conservatives, versus only 29 percent of Facebook users as a whole)."

malek's comment, October 24, 2014 9:21 AM
Interesting single column display
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20 Facts About The Great U.S. Retail Apocalypse That Will Blow Your Mind

20 Facts About The Great U.S. Retail Apocalypse That Will Blow Your Mind | Consumption Junction | Scoop.it

If the U.S. economy is getting better, then why are major retail chains closing thousands of stores?  If we truly are in an “economic recovery”, then why do sales figures continue to go down for large retailers all over the country?  Without a doubt, the rise of Internet retailing giants such as Amazon.com have had a huge impact.  Today, there are millions of Americans that actually prefer to shop online.  Personally, when I published my novel I made it solely available on Amazon.  But Internet shopping alone does not account for the great retail apocalypse that we are witnessing. 


In fact, some retail experts estimate that the Internet has accounted for only about 20 percent of the decline that we are seeing.  Most of the rest of it can be accounted for by the slow, steady death of the middle class U.S. consumer.  Median household income has declined for five years in a row, but all of our bills just keep going up.  That means that the amount of disposable income that average Americans have continues to shrink, and that is really bad news for retailers....


Via Jeff Domansky
Deanna Dahlsad's insight:

One of the ways the class warfare of the wealthy will hit them back -- in the wallet.

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, April 9, 2014 10:08 AM

Challenges ahead for retail, mostly based on the disappearance of good paying jobs for middle-class Americans.

Diane Dennis's curator insight, April 9, 2014 11:27 AM

How we shop for goods and services shifts to your marketplace, the internet. Own it.

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A good week for bad socialism

A good week for bad socialism | Consumption Junction | Scoop.it
With the passage of the Farm Bill and America's annual celebration of Super Bowl Sunday, it's been a good week for some of America's worst kinds of socialism. MSNBC's Lawrence O'Donnell explains in his latest Rewrite.
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Taxpayers, stadiums, and sports socialism

Taxpayers, stadiums, and sports socialism | Consumption Junction | Scoop.it
Taxpayer funded construction of sports stadiums is rarely an investment that generates enough revenue to justify the expense. Lawrence O'Donnell calls it the...
Deanna Dahlsad's insight:

Bad socialism

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Oppose Efforts to Pass the Marketplace Fairness Act

Oppose Efforts to Pass the Marketplace Fairness Act | Consumption Junction | Scoop.it

On May 6th, 2013, the U.S. Senate passed an Internet sales tax bill called the Marketplace Fairness Act. If this bill is allowed to become law, it would require many online sellers to collect sales taxes nationwide from the more than 9,600 tax jurisdictions. Additionally, sellers would face the prospect of being audited by tax collectors from far away states. The legislation was pushed through the Senate without meaningful hearings to give small businesses a chance to express concerns or an opportunity for Senators to amend the bill.


Unfortunately, the bill’s supporters and their lobbyists may be trying to bypass the regular legislative process and sneak this bill into law by attaching it to an unrelated federal budget bill in the months ahead.

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Curated by Deanna Dahlsad
An opinionated woman obsessed with objects, entertained by ephemera, intrigued by researching, fascinated by culture & addicted to writing. The wind says my name; doesn't put an @ in front of it, so maybe you don't notice. http://www.kitsch-slapped.com
Other Topics
A Marketing Mix
Adventures in advertising and marketing - the contemporary, the historical, and the hysterical. http://deanna.dahlsad.com/
Antiques & Vintage Collectibles
Collecting old things; heirlooms and new to you things! Companion to http://www.inherited-values.com/
Colorful Prism Of Racism
Racism past and present. Companion to http://www.kitsch-slapped.com/category/colorful-prism-of-racism/
Consumption Junction
Consumerism meets marketing; who & what manipulates the free market of goods & services. See also: http://www.kitsch-slapped.com/category/ze-big-mouth-promotions-stuff/
Crimes Against Humanity
From lone gunmen on hills to mass movements. Depressing as hell, really.
Cultural History
The roots of culture; history and pre-history.
Dare To Be A Feminist
I do. http://www.kitsch-slapped.com/category/hey-sister-can-you-spare-some-social-change/
For Art's Sake-1
Art, crafts, and the people who make them. To inspire and purchase. Companion to http://www.ululating-undulating-ungulate.com/
Herstory
History as this woman sees it. The serious, the kitsch, the opinionated. Companion to http://www.kitsch-slapped.com/
In The Name Of God
Mainly acts done in the name of religion, but also discussions of atheism, faith, & spirituality.
Kinsanity
Let's just say I have reasons to learn more about mental health, special needs children, psychology, and the like.
Kitsch
Mostly vintage and retro "badness" but you can decide how delicious it is. http://www.kitschy-kitschy-coo.com/blog/
Nerdy Needs
The stuff of nerdy, geeky, dreams.
Readin', 'Ritin', and (Publishing) 'Rithmetic
The meaning behind the math of the bottom line in publishing and the media. For writers, publishers, and bloggers (which are a combination of the two).
Sex Positive
Sexuality as a human right.
Vintage Living Today For A Future Tomorrow
It's as easy to romanticize the past as it is to demonize it; instead, let's learn from it. More than living simply, more than living 'green', thrifty grandmas knew the importance of the 'economics' in Home Economics. The history of home ec, lessons in thrift, practical tips and ideas from the past focused on sustainability for families and out planet. Companion to http://www.thingsyourgrandmotherknew.com/
Visiting The Past
Travel based on grande ideas, locations, and persons of the past.
Walking On Sunshine
Stuff that makes me smile.
You Call It Obsession & Obscure; I Call It Research & Important
Links to (many of) my columns and articles.