Consumption Junction
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Consumption Junction
Consumerism meets marketing; who and what manipulates the free market of good and services. See also: http://www.kitsch-slapped.com/category/ze-big-mouth-promotions-stuff/
Curated by Deanna Dahlsad
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Rescooped by Deanna Dahlsad from Antiques & Vintage Collectibles
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Rick Kahler: Collectibles Aren't Wise Retirement Investments | Financial Awakenings

Rick Kahler: Collectibles Aren't Wise Retirement Investments | Financial Awakenings | Consumption Junction | Scoop.it

Almost everyone has a story about a cousin or an aunt who bought a box of junk at an auction and found in it a diamond ring worth several hundred dollars. Every once in a while a valuable painting by a famous artist turns up in someone’s attic. “Antiques Roadshow” sometimes features odd items that have been sitting around in someone’s house for years and that are appraised for thousands of dollars.


This doesn’t mean buying and selling art or collectibles is a good way to make money.


Buying art, antiques, or collectibles is extremely speculative, in part because values are so subjective. What a given item is worth depends entirely on what a collector might be willing to pay at any given time. A piece of pottery or jewelry might fluctuate considerably in value as trends come and go. Yesterday’s hot collectible (think Beanie Babies or Jim Beam bottles) might be tomorrow’s overpriced embarrassment.

Does this mean you should never buy art or antiques in hopes that they’ll increase in value? Not necessarily. I am suggesting, though, that investment shouldn’t be the primary reason for your purchase.

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Rescooped by Deanna Dahlsad from Antiques & Vintage Collectibles
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Fashioning standards for industry conduct (Art & Antiques)

Fashioning standards for industry conduct (Art & Antiques) | Consumption Junction | Scoop.it

Doctors have the American Medical Association; lawyers are represented by the American Bar Association, car dealers, teachers, religions, and even countries have organized representation to promote their best interests to the public and government. Art and antiques dealers, one can categorically say, do not have any form of an umbrella organization that can advocate for its interests.

The many organizations that do attempt to be representatives of the industry are narrow in focus and small in membership. Whether it is the Art and Antiques Dealer’s League of America (AADLA), Antiques Dealers’ Association of American (ADA), National Antiques & Art Dealers Association of American (NAADAA), or the various state and local associations, they all have limited membership, finances, and interests. Individually they are just groups that attempt to create their own exclusivity of membership and can’t look at industry issues, be it a simple standard form of invoice or other business documents that have dealer and customer interests in mind; how about the larger purpose of the public’s image of dealers?


Via Deanna Dahlsad
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