science and technology, consuming cultures, tesc
14 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Renee Chandel from Music, Theatre, and Dance
Scoop.it!

Listen to a Recording of a Song Written on a Man’s Butt in a 15-Century Hieronymus Bosch Painting

Listen to a Recording of a Song Written on a Man’s Butt in a 15-Century Hieronymus Bosch Painting | science and technology, consuming cultures, tesc | Scoop.it
Michelangelo’s The Creation of Adam: god, his retinue of angels, and their cloak map neatly onto some of the main neural structures, including the major sulci in the cerebellum, the pituitary gland, the frontal lobe, and the optic chiasm.

Via Shannon Marie Robinson
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Renee Chandel from science and technology, consuming cultures, tesc
Scoop.it!

Lab-grown beef taste test: ‘Almost’ like a burger

Lab-grown beef taste test: ‘Almost’ like a burger | science and technology, consuming cultures, tesc | Scoop.it
Created from stem cells, meat patty was culmination of five-year, $330,000 research project.
Renee Chandel's insight:

Mark Post headed the project that succeeded in growing, from stem cells, the first beef hamburger created in a lab.  The $330,000, 5 oz burger was paid for by Sergey Brin, co-founder of Google. It was grown in 3 months. The meat was said to taste almost like the real thing, less juicy and more cake-like. The nutritional content of the burger has not been tested. Some people are repulsed by the idea of this unnatural process. Some animal rights supporters, such as president of PETA, Ingrid Newkirk, are supportive and veiw cultured meat as a solution to animal slaughter. Post estimates lab grown meat to be available in supermarkets within 20 years.

more...
Renee Chandel's curator insight, February 4, 2014 9:06 PM

Mark Post headed the project that succeeded in growing, from stem cells, the first beef hamburger created in a lab.  The $330,000, 5 oz burger was paid for by Sergey Brin, co-founder of Google. It was grown in 3 months. The meat was said to taste almost like the real thing, less juicy and more cake-like. The nutritional content of the burger has not been tested. Some people are repulsed by the idea of this unnatural process. Some animal rights supporters, such as president of PETA, Ingrid Newkirk, are supportive and veiw cultured meat as a solution to animal slaughter. Post estimates lab grown meat to be available in supermarkets within 20 years.

 

Scooped by Renee Chandel
Scoop.it!

Whole Foods Bans Produce Grown With Sludge. But Who Wins?

Whole Foods Bans Produce Grown With Sludge. But Who Wins? | science and technology, consuming cultures, tesc | Scoop.it
Whole Foods says its farmers can't use treated sewage sludge on fields. Some say that's a mistake.
Renee Chandel's insight:

Whole foods markets itself for the consumer. They recently have banned foods grown using "sludge" or biosolids as fertilizer. Biosolids are essentially human waste and people associate it with filth. The article claims that biosolids may be an eco friendly option, that the other option most likely being used are synthetic fertilizers that may be more harmful.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Renee Chandel
Scoop.it!

3D printed toothbrush that claims to clean teeth in six seconds - Telegraph

3D printed toothbrush that claims to clean teeth in six seconds - Telegraph | science and technology, consuming cultures, tesc | Scoop.it
A toothbrush that can clean teeth in just six seconds has been developed using a 3D printer.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Renee Chandel
Scoop.it!

Lab-grown beef taste test: ‘Almost’ like a burger

Lab-grown beef taste test: ‘Almost’ like a burger | science and technology, consuming cultures, tesc | Scoop.it
Created from stem cells, meat patty was culmination of five-year, $330,000 research project.
Renee Chandel's insight:

Mark Post headed the project that succeeded in growing, from stem cells, the first beef hamburger created in a lab.  The $330,000, 5 oz burger was paid for by Sergey Brin, co-founder of Google. It was grown in 3 months. The meat was said to taste almost like the real thing, less juicy and more cake-like. The nutritional content of the burger has not been tested. Some people are repulsed by the idea of this unnatural process. Some animal rights supporters, such as president of PETA, Ingrid Newkirk, are supportive and veiw cultured meat as a solution to animal slaughter. Post estimates lab grown meat to be available in supermarkets within 20 years.

 

more...
Renee Chandel's curator insight, February 4, 2014 9:06 PM

Mark Post headed the project that succeeded in growing, from stem cells, the first beef hamburger created in a lab.  The $330,000, 5 oz burger was paid for by Sergey Brin, co-founder of Google. It was grown in 3 months. The meat was said to taste almost like the real thing, less juicy and more cake-like. The nutritional content of the burger has not been tested. Some people are repulsed by the idea of this unnatural process. Some animal rights supporters, such as president of PETA, Ingrid Newkirk, are supportive and veiw cultured meat as a solution to animal slaughter. Post estimates lab grown meat to be available in supermarkets within 20 years.

Scooped by Renee Chandel
Scoop.it!

Why over 1,000 people are competing to go to Mars – and not come back

Why over 1,000 people are competing to go to Mars – and not come back | science and technology, consuming cultures, tesc | Scoop.it
Mars One, the Dutch nonprofit planning to put a human colony on Mars in 2025, has whittled its applicant pool to about 1,000 people hoping to give up their Earthling-status, for good.
Renee Chandel's insight:

Over 200,000 people applied to be sent to live on Mars without ever returning to Earth. Mars One, a dutch non profit, has whittled down the pool to about 1,000 applicants. The project will be funded as a reality style television show. There will be 24 people selected to live on Mars, planned launch is in 2025. This article was non biased, stated facts but currently the project is too far into the future to determine whether it will be a success.

more...
No comment yet.