Consumerization of IT
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Consumerization of IT
Trends and issues related to adoption of consumer devices and services in the Enterprise
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Enterprises Beware: Don't Let Security Fall into the Consumerisation Gap

Enterprises Beware: Don't Let Security Fall into the Consumerisation Gap | Consumerization of IT | Scoop.it

A survey on the consumerisation of IT point to security concerns as a key barrier to enabling employees to use personal devices and consumer applications for work.

Like many free-floating fears, IT managers’ security worries aren’t just paranoid fantasies — they do have some basis in reality. For example, 70 percent of IT respondents to our survey cited employee-provided smartphones as security threats.

 

The research shows that consumer and social technologies are entering the workplace about 50 percent more quickly than IT realizes, so in a sense, the situation that IT managers see as a threat is intensifying.

 

So what actions are IT executives taking to accommodate this fearsome reality? The short answer is “not enough.”

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Die, VPN! We're all "telecommuters" now and IT must adjust

Thanks to ubiquitous broadband and high-quality smartphones and laptops, even office workers who don't "telecommute" have become "telecommuters." IT departments must embrace working outside the office walls—and they can start by killing most VPNs.

 

Telecommuting as a separate thing is pretty much dead. You get e-mail on your phone, you write documents on your iPad, you run videoconferences on your laptop, and you do that anywhere you happen to be. When people conduct FaceTime chats on airplanes over the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, the idea that there's this special "telecommuting" thing you have, and that you need special gear to do it, is dead, dead, dead. Everyone is "telecommuting."

 

This is the issue for most companies and IT departments: not if they will allow telecommuting/remote working, but how they will manage it. How do you deal with every employee wanting to BYOD, (Bring Your Own Device), expecting that they can get to the resources they need from home, in a hotel, or on an airplane? When everyone working for you has a smartphone, how do you justify making them carry two? When everyone buys a personal tablet, how do you say, "No! You may not use that for work!" (More importantly, why would you say that?)

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Telco Cost Management or Mobile Device Management? How About Both?

In light of last week's launch of iPhone 4s and its record-breaking first weekend sales, it's clear that the Consumerization of Enterprise Mobility is primed for another significant surge as we head into the holiday season.

 

The management challenges of mobile devices is rapidly becoming an overwhelming thought for many IT leaders for three key reasons:

 

- Many employees have a laptop, a smart phone, and now an iPad, creating a 3X management challenge.

- Apps, the second wave of consumerization, are being downloaded at an unprecedented pace.

- The definition of “mobile worker” has changed. Employees no longer need to be mobile to need mobility in their jobs.

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The Consumerisation of IT in the Enterprise: A View From the Field - Microsoft Around the Globe - Site Home - MSDN Blogs

The consumerisation of IT is a trend that has gathered momentum in recent years and refers to the ways in which the consumer sector and business sector are converging. It is used as an umbrella term covering many things, including allowing employees to buy or bring to the workplace devices of their choice. This will sometimes replace being given designated computers or other devices, but it can also supplement the traditional model. The IT consumerisation tag can also be used to refer to the way in which some companies (or individuals) use consumer software and services such as Facebook and Twitter to accomplish business tasks.

 

This paper focuses largely on the first aspect as allowing staff to select their own devices is a highly visible change that can lead to clashing opinions, ranging from those who consider their consumer devices vastly preferable to those who regard consumerisation as a dangerous trend that can lead to disorder and compromise security.

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Latest device releases (Amazon Fire and iPhone 4S) should push consumerization further into enterprises.

A pair of recent product releases from two of the biggest names in the technology industry have sent the mobile industry into a frenzy. One is a low-cost tablet that promises to introduce the devices to the masses, while the other is the latest in a long line of extremely popular and successful smartphones.

 

They are, of course, Amazon's Kindle Fire tablet and Apple's iPhone 4S. Both were highly anticipated before finally being introduced during the past two weeks – the Kindle Fire intro closed out September, while Apple opened October with the iPhone 4S. Experts are expecting both devices to create quite a stir – pre-orders for the Kindle Fire have reportedly surpassed 250,000 – in both the consumer and enterprise markets.

 

For companies, the tablet and the smartphone could present plenty of new opportunities for enterprise mobility, placing them squarely in the driver's seat of IT consumerization.

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The consumer-industrial complex

All sorts of organisations are borrowing ideas from consumer technology.

 

When she starts her day at Sarasota Memorial Hospital in Florida, Danielle Reed picks up a smartphone. It is part of a system provided by Voalté, a start-up created to modify smartphones for doctors and nurses. The phone allows Ms Reed to communicate quickly and easily with her fellow nurses either by calling them or by sending text messages, a number of which are preprogrammed. She can also open specialised apps: one allows her to look up different medicines and their side-effects; another helps her identify pills brought in by patients.

 

Ms Reed says that the smartphone has other benefits too. She no longer has to carry different devices for making phone calls and receiving alerts, and she can send group text messages, which makes it easier to communicate with all of her colleagues on a ward. The 300 or so phones provided by Voalté (whose name comprises the first two letters of “voice”, “alarm” and “text”) have also helped to make Sarasota Memorial a quieter place for both patients and workers. Before introducing them the hospital often relied on a noisy public paging system to send messages to nurses and other staff. This is now used much less.

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The "Big Five" IT trends of the next half decade: Mobile, social, cloud, consumerization, and big data

Much has been written lately about the speed at which technology is reshaping the business landscape today. Except that’s not quite phrasing it correctly. It’s more like it’s leaving the traditional business world behind. There are a number of root causes: The blistering pace of external innovation, the divergent path the consumer world has taken from enterprise IT, and the throughput limitations of top-down adoption.

 

As a result, there’s a rapidly expanding gap between what the technology world is executing on and what the enterprise can deliver. Many now think this gap may actually become untenable, and they may be right. Yet recent large surveys of CIOs continues to show an almost exclusively evolutionary and internal focus. Many feel that a technology emphasis is wrong right now, and they’re certainly right, if it’s not integrated with top priority business objectives. However, these days it’s technology advancements and new digital markets that are often the key to an organization’s future.

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