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Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments
The Identification, measurement and analysis of consumer types, perceptions, attitudes, and activities in digital environments.
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MediaPost Publications Retail App Users Are Best Brick-And-Mortar Customers 01/09/2014

MediaPost Publications Retail App Users Are Best Brick-And-Mortar Customers 01/09/2014 | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Retail App Users Are Best Brick-And-Mortar Customers - 01/09/2014

 

As most evolved brands with a range of mobile presence already know, branded apps are best suited for your loyal core customer. The mobile Web is usually better able to spread a wider net via search and social to acquire newer users. And perhaps it is not surprising, but still worth mentioning, that branded app users also are heavy users of that retailer's brick-and-mortar venues.

 

Mobile commerce platform Digby just issued its year-end analysis of holiday shopping patterns both on devices and in the physical realm. The company found that shoppers who had retail apps on their smartphones were more active regular shoppers even in a down season for physical retail. Digby measured a 29.6% increase this year in total visits during the holiday season than the year before. Digby's Localpoint analytics tools allows retailers to analyze its users' behaviors over time, including store visits, revisits, and time spent in store.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This recent study finds a correlation between brick and mortar retail app users and #brandloyalty. It also contains #stats about other related behaviors.

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Ministry of Defence funding research into online habits

Ministry of Defence funding research into online habits | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

PhD papers sponsored by military include studies of hacker culture, crowd behaviour and social networking sites.

 

A branch of the Ministry of Defence is funding postgraduate research into the culture of computer hackers, crowd behaviour at music festivals and football matches, and the impact of Twitter, Facebook and online conspiracy theories in times of crisis.

The MoD's Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) pays six-figure sums to support individual PhD students to help understand the rapidly evolving world of cyberspace and the way in which social media have become an integral part of daily life.

While some of the PhD projects in the £10m programme have conventional military applications – such as researching technology to support underwater drones, and the development of clothing with fully embedded electronics – £97,487 of funding for research at King's College London into "the rise of the digital insurgency" is typical of the new direction.

Background papers for the digital insurgency doctorate at King's College say that the research will target the so-called "hacktivist" groupAnonymous. The project will involve the researcher aiming to interact with members of Anonymous, addressing "known unknowns" relating to the group, and understand its grievances and goals, why people are attracted to it and its internal politics.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Interesting development in the UK.

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Emails, Product Reviews, and Apps Most Likely to Impact Customer Behavior | Loyalty360.org

Emails, Product Reviews, and Apps Most Likely to Impact Customer Behavior | Loyalty360.org | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Emails, product reviews, and shopping apps are “star” tools to drive customer engagement according to the Ryan Partnership Digital Shopping Tool Impact Study 2013.


The study found that shoppers rank tools depending on their ability to influence their shopping behavior and satisfy their shopper needs. The Ryan study, which covered 16 different digital shopping tools, revealed that emails from brands and retailers, online product reviews and shopping apps are considered most useful by shoppers and most likely to impact shopper behavior. 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Most likely there are a configuration of tools that impact shopping behaviors. There use probably varies across product categories and the shopper's self-selected exposure to them.

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How To Curate Interests, Not Just Specialties: Part I | Angela Dunn

How To Curate Interests, Not Just Specialties: Part I | Angela Dunn | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Angela Dunn explores content curation as a means to lifelong and collaborative learning. She shows how to curate around diverse interests, like a Generalist.

 

Many people know the value of usingcontent curation as a tool for thought leadership. Curating content around your specialty or area of expertise, and adding a point of view, is a great way to build your thought leadership. However, many are now just beginning to understand the value of curating over a wider set of interests.

 

In addition to displaying your expertise, content curation can be a means to lifelong and collaborative learning. Becoming a “Generalist” is a 21st century skill set. Learning how to curate your interests can increase your chances for serendipity by allowing you to connect through valuable “weak ties” – or “friends of friends.” Weak ties drive the value of networks exponentially.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This article outlines the value received from engaging in curation as a personal learning behavior and some tips for how to get started.

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Consumers to Rethink Priorities in 2014, Ford Trend Report Reveals - Press Release

Consumers to Rethink Priorities in 2014, Ford Trend Report Reveals - Press Release | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Consumers will reevaluate their relationships with technology in 2014, balancing the need to be constantly plugged in with a new appreciation for spending quality time off-line, reveals Ford Motor Company’s second annual trend report, released today.

 

The report – Looking Further with Ford 2014 – highlights 10 global trends for the new year that explore how the technology explosion will affect consumer choices and behaviors.

 

The top global trend for 2014, Innovation’s Quiet Riot, explores whether people will continue trying to keep up with an always-on society and experience a fear of missing out, or begin to find joy in moments free of digital distraction.

 

Against this backdrop, Looking Further with Ford 2014 uncovers people’s desire to have downtime to reflect on what matters most – friends, family and community. This evokes nostalgia as consumers remember the comfort and character associated with the way things were.

 

“There is no escaping the impact – both positive and negative – of the rapid pace of technology. What is more fascinating to watch in 2014 is how a culture of reflection is emerging,” said Sheryl Connelly, Ford global trend and futuring manager. “We are seeing a consumer culture that is increasingly mindful of the need to nurture society’s valuable and irreplaceable resources.”

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A very interesting study with some surprising findings. Well worth reviewing. You can download the report on the website.

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MediaPost Publications 31% Compare Prices While Shopping, 34% Don't Use Phone in Store 12/18/2013

MediaPost Publications 31% Compare Prices While Shopping, 34% Don't Use Phone in Store 12/18/2013 | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Numerous studies show that consumers shop on their smartphones and tablets but buy in stores.

 

It’s also no secret that many consumers also use their phones in stores as they shop and a recent survey gives some indication of the range of mobile activities going on in stores.

 

Many consumers are comparing prices, looking for deals and checkout product reviews, according to the survey by Marketing Land. Here’s the range of what shoppers do:

 

31% -- Compare prices of products through Amazon, other online retailers30% -- Look for offers and coupons28% -- Call friends or family for advice27% -- Look for product reviews18% -- Found other stores that have a desired product in stock15% -- Scan barcodes or QR codes13% -- Look for gift ideas

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Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s curator insight, December 19, 2013 1:20 PM

Mobile shopping patterns are complex, and as more technology is incorporated into the devices, the complexity increases. At a minimum there are four basic dimensions that define the patterns, the device used (smartphone, tablet, etc.), the task (research, purchase, etc.), the location (e.g., instore,at home, at work, etc.), and the software platform (e.g., email, qrcode, website, apps, etc.). The sequencing and types of interactions have numerous possible combinations that can be captured in a digital data stream and analyzed. 

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E-commerce survey on buyer behaviour and ad preferences [Infographic} - Smart Insights Digital Marketing Advice

E-commerce survey on buyer behaviour and ad preferences [Infographic} - Smart Insights Digital Marketing Advice | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

What consumers want and how to give it to them?

This infographic isn’t a compilation of different unreferenced sources, rather it’s based on a single piece of research by Sociomantic Labs who polled over 1000 US consumers via ResearchNow, specifically to assess their attitudes toward online shopping and digital advertising.

‘It found that personalized ads lead to a dramatic improvement in a marketing channel’s perceived influence, as well as a channel’s ability to encourage consumers to take action’.

Their findings delved into shopper behaviour by understanding:

why and how consumers shop – interestingly, 41% visit a site with a ‘product in their mind’ to buy or research.how consumers use online shopping carts – 19% add to their cart to create a reminder/wish list.how consumers embrace targeted ads – 70% happy to receive ads andhow receptive consumers are to ad targeting – targeted content converts browsers to buyers.

The infographic provides more key highlights and Sociomantic’s site gives more details.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A nice summary of some recent survey research findings of online shopping behaviors, preferences and attitudes.

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Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, December 7, 2013 8:10 PM

As I've long said, consumers don't mind advertising as much as some think they do...

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Does Influence Marketing Have a Future? - Business 2 Community

Does Influence Marketing Have a Future? - Business 2 Community | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Earlier this year, Forbes published an article entitled Who Are the Top 50 Social Media Power Influencers, 2013? by Haydn Shaughnessy. It followed similar posts by Shaughnessy on The Top 20 Women Social Media Influencers, also on Forbes, and a similar Top 50 list 12 months earlier.

 

The article soon came under fire from certain areas of the web, including Mark Schaefer’s Grow blog and Jure Klepic of the Huffington Post. Additionally, there were numerous conversations across the web on the Forbes article, with the majority of people discounting its validation.

So why did a publication like Forbes receive such criticism, and what does the discounting of influencer results like the one on Forbes mean for influence marketing in general?



Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This is a thoughtful article overall, but like many others it suffers from a lack of a clear unambiguous definition of influence and influencers. I am reminded of Duncan Watts' observation that "influencer theory is bogus" [ see: http://bit.ly/18oeMps ].

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Joachim Scholz, PhD's comment, December 8, 2013 8:16 AM
Good point, Russ. I am also reminded of an HBR from May 2013: "What would Ashton do - and does it matter?", which discusses that Ashton Kutcher has a massive twitter fanbase, but how many people actually do things because they read it on his feed? There has been also a Journal of Consumer Research article some years back (2010?) that modelled social influence, finding that the Katz and Lazarsfeld Two-Step Flow Model of social influence is flawed: It is not the all-powerful influencer at the center, but consumers are influenced by other easily influenced consumers similar to them. This all goes into the same direction as the conclusion of this article: Be customer centric, not influencer centric.
Joachim Scholz, PhD's curator insight, December 8, 2013 8:20 AM

This blog post reminds me of an HBR from May 2013: "What would Ashton do - and does it matter?", which discusses that Ashton Kutcher has a massive twitter fanbase, but how many people actually do things because they read it on his feed? There has been also a Journal of Consumer Research article some years back (2010?) that modelled social  influence, finding that the Katz and Lazarsfeld Two-Step Flow Model of social influence is flawed: It is not the all-powerful influencer at the center, but consumers are influenced by other easily influenced consumers similar to them.

 

This all goes into the same direction as the conclusion of this article: Be customer centric, not influencer centric:

 

"This is the where the flaws of putting today’s definition of an influencer at the heart of the marketing circle appear; and why we need to move beyond this, and start putting the actual customer at the heart of the circle, and work back from there.


By taking this approach, we understand who the true influencers are – customers – and what they’re looking for, as well as who’s influencing their decisions at a specific point in time."

Tannah Gravelis's curator insight, August 22, 2014 2:16 AM

This article is an interesting perspective into social influencers, and how exactly to measure the 'influence' of an individual. it raises the interesting point that popularity doesn't equate to influence, which is something that marketers and wannabe social influencers are still trying to finesse. This article is an interesting insight into another angle of looking at the social influencer phenomenon

 

Rank = 5

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RichRelevance Shopping Insights™ Study Unveils How Social Platforms Fare Leading into Holiday 2013 : RichRelevance

RichRelevance Shopping Insights™ Study Unveils How Social Platforms Fare Leading into Holiday 2013 : RichRelevance | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

RichRelevance® today released its Social Media Shopping Infographic.  The data analyzes nearly seven hundred million online shopping sessions to showcase how social channels are impacting ecommerce and how they stack up against each other in the lead up to the 2013 Holiday Shopping Season.

 

“While social shopping remains a small percentage of total online commerce, our findings show that there are key trends that retailers can glean from consumer habits and preferences in these channels,” said David Selinger, CEO of RichRelevance. “The key takeaway is that each social channel is unique and can deliver different types of benefits to a brand’s marketing efforts.”

 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Research by RichRelevance reveals that Facebook produces more than three times the number of sessions and 10 times the number of orders than the next most prolific social site, Polyvore. Pinterest has been gaining ground on Facebook with 25% of social shopping sessions (up 14% from last year) and now generates more than double the average order value (AOV) of Facebook. Twitter continues to produce the smallest numbers across the board.

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Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, December 5, 2013 2:40 AM

Everyone's always talking about Facebook; but if you're selling merch, Pinterest is far more valuable.

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Welcome to Tomorrowland:

Welcome to Tomorrowland: | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

The Internet of Things is an ever growing reality that is poised to transform the world, especially as it relates to data analytics. The increasing flows of information available from virtually every device humans use for work or leisure is fueling the “who, what, where, when & how” of data analysis and the advent of Big Data as a true solution to harness it all. My belief is that the future of MR will be focused on the “why” to provide context and insights into these unimaginably vast streams of data flowing in the world.

 

For more on my take of how this will impact our industry check out a presentation I recently did for the Mid-Atlantic MRA:

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

The #InternetofThings is a potentally new and powerful way to link people to the things that they use. The implications for #marketingresearch and greater understanding of consumer behaviors is mind bending.

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Marketers and Their Problems With Data

Marketers and Their Problems With Data | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

For all the talk about "real-time" insights, it turns out that very few marketers are actually looking at their data sources every day. At least that's one of the takeaways from a new Domo-sponsored report [download page] that presents study results suggesting that marketers are disconnected from (drumroll…) data. Domo’s survey of 301 marketers indicates that no more than one-third of respondents are checking – on a daily basis – any of the data sources they use.

 

Elsewhere in the survey, 83% of respondents agree that it is important to have access to real-time marketing data, but only 37% agree that they can access the marketing data they need in real-time.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Despite the demand for #realtime data, a new study revals that few marketers are using it on a daily basis.

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The iPhone Effect: Why Marketers May Overspend In Social Media Campaigns

The iPhone Effect: Why Marketers May Overspend In Social Media Campaigns | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Of all the groups that help create a buzz for a new product, one group stands out: “early adopters.”

This is a group usually composed of the young and restless, the better-educated, always searching for something new to improve, rather than excite, their lives.

  

Early adopters are also consumer leaders, following industry and product trends. They are “ideal shoppers,” shopping for new products to keep up with emerging trends. And they are the “bridge” to a larger consumer group, the “early majority,” as described by the Rogers Curve.

 

Early adopters have been credited for the quick adoption of popular high-tech gadgets like iPods, iPhones, iPads; energy drinks like Red Bull ; well-liked restaurants like Chipotle, and popular coffee shops like Starbucks SBUX -0.11% . That’s why early adopters are the targets of WOM and buzz in social media marketing campaigns.

But is social media the right way to reach early adopters?

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Homophily and spurious correlations may inflate the #wordofmouth or #buzz effects.

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Photo and Video Sharers Are More Likely to Be Young and Female

Photo and Video Sharers Are More Likely to Be Young and Female | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Does it seem like your social feeds are jammed with your friends’ latest baby video or vacation pictures?

 

Helped by Snapchat and Instagram, image-sharing has increased significantly in the past year, with more than half of Internet users now posting their own pictures and videos online, a new Pew Internet Project report reveals. In Pew’s first read on Snapchat, it found that 9 percent of cell phone owners use the popular app that automatically deletes images and videos after they’ve been viewed, and fully 18 percent use Instagram, the image- and video-sharing app recently bought by Facebook.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A summary in #infographic form of findings from a recent Pew Research study about "social sharing" behaviors and the technologies that support them. It helps explain some of what we all see in our #socialmedia feeds.

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Consumer Psychology at the E-Commerce Checkout

Consumer Psychology at the E-Commerce Checkout | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

E-Commerce and online shopping has become a significant stream of revenue for companies worldwide, but how much do we really know about the consumer psychology behind web purchases?

Research has shown that a consumer will assess a product within 90 seconds and will then make a quick initial judgement on whether they decide to make a purchase or not. Video is another big factor when it comes to influencing consumers to make a transaction. Nearly one third of online shoppers bought a product after being influenced by video and 50 percent of customers have more confidence in a product after watching a video online.

Trusted resources such as product reviews have become a massive part of how people shop online. A whopping 85 percent of people said they read online reviews before making a transaction. Two thirds of customers read up to six online reviews in order to trust a business/product enough to complete a purchase.

Why do online shoppers get to the checkout point and then abandon the purchase? The average figure for checkout abandonment rate is 67.4 percent. The main reasons for abandonment are hidden charges and having to register before buying. Other reasons include lengthy checkout process, unclear delivery details and a phone number not included on the website.



Read more: http://www.powerretail.com.au/research-and-intelligence/consumer-psychology-at-the-checkout/#ixzz2prnOGV1a

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A great #Infographic that summarizes the consumer psychology of shoppers during #ecommerce online checkout. It's filled with many useful #stats and research findings.

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Gonzalo Moreno's curator insight, February 22, 2014 7:02 AM

Another delicious infography!
<3

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Digital Life and Consumers - Analyst Insight from Euromonitor International

Digital Life and Consumers - Analyst Insight from Euromonitor International | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Analyst Insight by Daphne Kasriel - Consumers Editor

 

This monthly bulletin on all things digital listens in to consumption as consumers themselves see and tell it online. News and trends are covered under the following topics: Internet shopping & “sellsumers”, citizen advertising and crowdsourcing (brands working with consumers to promote themselves, co-create and relate), frugalistas & consumer vigilantes, microblogging, tech-savvy generations Y & Z, social networking, mobile onliners and the blogosphere.

 

 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Reports on the latest trends in digital consumer behavior in eight categories.

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Firm aims to put dollar value on social influence

Firm aims to put dollar value on social influence | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Online gaming companies are sizing up their top dogs to determine which players are worth the most, according to one analytics company executive.


Using a learning algorithm, online social gamers are being ranked by their estimated dollar value, a number that takes into account a user's contacts, specific transactions and other behaviors, according to Ninja Metrics, a company that performs predictive analytics.

 

The algorithm can be used to calculate the so-called social value of users in nongaming environments too, said Ninja Metrics CEO Dmitri Williams. 

But in order to be the most accurate and useful, it must be applied to sites and apps where transactions are frequent, like movie ticket or song sales, Williams told "Big Data Download."

"Because there's an algorithm here that has to learn something, the thing has to happen more than once or twice for us to really feel confident about it," he said.


In online gaming, currently the only environment in which the algorithm is being used, the predicted value of individual gamers isn't perfectly accurate. 

By comparing earlier predictions of a gamer's social value to actual outcomes, Ninja Metrics has found that its algorithm is 90 percent accurate on average, Williams said. 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

See the video on Yahoo Finance that contains an interview with the CEO. Not much detail provided but I wonder what Duncan Watts would say about this claim.

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Tablets Poised To Overtake Smartphones As Shopping Device Of Choice

Tablets Poised To Overtake Smartphones As Shopping Device Of Choice | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

When we talk about devices in mobile marketing, most marketers’ thoughts still jump directly to smartphones. And for good reason. They’re cheaper and more portable than tablets (at least when subsidized by the carriers), and smartphones are a consumer’s constant companion. They also account for the largest market share of mobile devices.

 

According to a recent industry survey 56% of adult Americans have a smartphone, while 35% of US citizens over the age of 16 own a tablet device. And if patterns established during past holiday seasons continue — even to a lesser extent as the market becomes saturated — the number of tablets in circulation are likely to grow after people open their Christmas presents.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Recent research finds that #tablet devices on #mobile optimized websites is the combination of choice for #digital #shopping.

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Laurent Steiger's curator insight, December 27, 2013 4:43 PM

Selon un rapport de Business Insider les tablettes représentent 50% des ventes mobiles pour un taux d'équipement encore inférieur aux smartphones (35% contre 56%)

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Infographic Alert: Detailed Stats Around Shopping's Future | The eTail Blog

Infographic Alert: Detailed Stats Around Shopping's Future | The eTail Blog | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Infographic Alert: Detailed Stats Around Shopping's Future from Gift-Library.com

 

No one is arguing with statistics pointing to the fact that ecommerce will one day overtake other forms of shopping. The growth pace is just too staggering to think differently.

 

An infographic put together by Gift-Library.com highlights statistics about how the trend is moving, citing how global ecommerce retail sales will reach $1,321.4 trillion by 2016. This number is a 67% increase from 2011.

 

Here are some more stats from the graphic:

- 59% of UK shoppers refuse to wait on line (or in queue) when they shop; 32% would opt to buy online when faced with a queue.
- 90% of shoppers use their smartphone for pre-shopping tasks.
- One in three people prefer social media over telephone customer service.
- By 2010, iTunes had sold more than 25 billion songs.

Check out the full graphic below to see just how telling the stats really are:

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

The future of #shopping is increasingly digital in nature. This infographic compiles some forecasts for the next 3-4 years and outlines the implications of the expected #ecommerce explosion.

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Double Retention Simply by Conducting a Survey

QuestionPro explores the results of a research study published in the Harvard Business Review. The study found that simply the act of asking for feedback double
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A summary of a recent study in Harvard Business Review that purports to show that the act of conducting a #customersatisfaction survey increases retention and other favorable reactions to the #brand. This finding is not surprising because conducting a survey sends a message to the customer that the company is concerned about them. Once customers take the survey, this action on their part is a tacit acceptance and recognition of the company's concern which builds a more positive attitude to the brand. As a result attribution theory predicts that their future behavior will likewise be favorable.

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GRIT Sneak Peek: The Top 5 Emerging Methods In Market Research

GRIT Sneak Peek: The Top 5 Emerging Methods In Market Research | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

In keeping with our SOP of the last few years though, we’re doing a few “sneak peeks” on some subjects we covered in the most recent GRIT study. One of the perennial favorite topics is the adoption of newer approaches into the researcher toolkit, so here is at least a little bit of what we found.

 

Now, on to the  reason you clicked on this link: what emerging methods are growing and approaching mainstream penetration? The Top 5 are:

 

Online CommunitiesMobile SurveysSocial Media AnalyticsText AnalyticsBig Data Analytics
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A look at what marketing researchers consider to be the top emerging methods for acquiring informatin about consumers and the market.

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Joachim Scholz, PhD's curator insight, December 8, 2013 8:05 AM

As a qualitative researcher, the graph above is great news for me: Qualitative and interpretive methods are more and more integrated into Marketing Research professionals. Surveys have ruled as King over the MR toolkit for a long time, but this reign has come to an end. Not a revolution, but a much needed diversification.

 

Online Community analysis is used by almost half of all 2,229 respondents to this survey (see, method diversification works both ways). Social Media Analytics is another great example of method diversification wrapped-in-one, because it often involves a mix of quantified metrics (sentiment analysis, volume, etc) and a qualitative analysis of individual mentions on social media. Text analysis is another tool on the top 5 used MR tools that carries a heavy interpretivist bent (though could also be automated, of which I am rather sceptical, given the complexity of human language).

 

Outside the top 5 most used tools, we see many more qualitative methods being used to a fair share, and some of them show an incredible potential in terms of how many MR professionals are planning to use them: Webcam-Based Interviewing, Mobile Qualitative and Mobile Ethnography are all qualitative research methods that can generate deep insights into consumers' lives. And especially the last two show a great potential with almost 40% of respondents planning to use these methods in the future. 

 

What comes out of this data is that recent technological advances have given qualitative methods a great boost. As qualitative researchers, we should embrace these technologies and venture further into videography and mobile technologies, using consumers' own devices as often as we can.

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People Shopping on Mobile Devices Visit More Sites Than Those on a PC

People Shopping on Mobile Devices Visit More Sites Than Those on a PC | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Mobile devices have made it possible for people to shop anywhere, anytime, and apparently, they’re taking advantage. According to Millward Brown Digital, people who shop from their mobiles visit more retailer sites than those who shop from their PCs (6.2 retailer visits per month on mobiles versus 2.9 on PCs). Mobile shoppers also use search engines and social media sites more than PC shoppers do. With all that opportunity to capture mobile purchases (or lose them to rivals), there’s all the more reason for retailers to make sure their mobile strategy is airtight.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Recent research by Millward Brown Digital shows some interesting shopping behavior differences between mobile and PC based shoppers. However, it is unclear what the base number of shoppers are in each group, or how many use both devices.

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Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, December 5, 2013 10:25 AM

It is nearly impossible not to notice some (more than) probably gender differences here; it sure looks like the men are shopping via mobile phone and tablet, while women are at the pc. This likely means big differences in terms of social sites, such as Pinterest, as well as in the shopping categories themselves.

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Holiday shopping: Love it or hate it, more do it online

Holiday shopping: Love it or hate it, more do it online | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

The holiday shopping spree kicked off early this year as large retailers like Wal-Mart and Target started offering online dealsmany weeks before Thanksgiving weekend. For brick-and-mortar shoppers, some stores will even extend their Black Friday hours into Thanksgiving Day. That’s both good news and bad news for many Americans, as attitudes about holiday shopping can be quite polarizing.

 

Asked if holiday shopping was something they look forward to or dread, 42% of Americans say they look forward to it, while 50% of Americans say they dread it,according to a CBS News poll earlier this month. And 61% say they won’t shop at all over Thanksgiving weekend, compared with 36% who say they will. Just 2% of Americans say they will shop on Thanksgiving Day itself — the majority of Americans (76%) believe stores should be closed then.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

The changing patterns of holiday shopping.

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Gratitude or guilt? People spend more when they ‘pay it forward’

Gratitude or guilt? People spend more when they ‘pay it forward’ | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

As shoppers across the nation prepare to pounce on Black Friday sales, researchers at UC Berkeley are looking at what happens to commerce when there’s no set price tag. In an exhaustive study of consumer behavior, they found that shoppers spend more money when engaged in a chain of goodwill known as “Pay-it-forward” than when they can name their own price.

 

Whether out of guilt, gratitude or pure generosity, study finds that consumers spend more when they ‘pay-it-forward’ than when they pay what they want (iStockphoto)

“It’s assumed that consumers are selfish and always looking for the best deal, but when we gave people the option to pay for someone else, they always paid more than what they paid for themselves,” said the study’s lead author, Minah Jung, a doctoral student at the Haas School of Business and a Gratitude Dissertation Fellow at UC Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Interesting research findings that suggests a cascading pyramid of goodwill effects associated with the #payitforward pricing method. Maybe people do believe that it is "better to give, than to receive".

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3 Audience Types That Are Essential to Successful Content Marketing

3 Audience Types That Are Essential to Successful Content Marketing | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

The most critical part of a successful content marketing program is building your audience. Without an audience to consume it, there's no reason for businesses to create content in the first place. Without the audience, we cannot drive revenue of any kind.

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What Does Your Facebook Status Say About Your Personality?

What Does Your Facebook Status Say About Your Personality? | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

A group of University of Pennsylvania researchers who analyzed the Facebook status updates of 75,000 volunteers have found an entirely different way to analyze human personality, according to a new study published in PLOS One. The volunteers completed a common personality questionnaire through a Facebook application and made their Facebook status updates available so that researchers could find linguistic patterns in the language.

 

Drawing from more than 700 million words, phrases, and topics, the researchers built computer models that predicted the individuals’ age, gender, and their responses on the personality questionnaires with surprising accuracy. The "open-vocabulary approach" of analyzing all words was shown to be equally predictive (and in some cases moreso) than traditional methods used by psychologists, such as self-reported surveys and questionnaires, that use a predetermined set of words to analyze.

 

Basically, it's big data meets psychology.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A report on a recent study that developed #psychological profiles of Facebook users. Some gender, age and personality differences are shown.

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Christopher Lee's curator insight, November 15, 2013 1:53 AM

A lot of potential to analyze social networks for consumer behavior and psychology. Working on a similar project at Oregon.