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Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments
The Identification, measurement and analysis of consumer types, perceptions, attitudes, and activities in digital environments.
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Women Dominate Social Media [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter

Women Dominate Social Media [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Did you know that women use social media more often and in more ways than their male counterparts?

 

What if I told you that more women use Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, Instagram and Twitter than men – men dominate on LinkedIn, and that’s it – and that they’re more likely to use social media sites several times each day?

 

Moreover, women are more likely to engage with brands on social media than men, consume more news from social sources and are leading the trend towards mobile. This visual from Finances Online takes a closer look at why women dominate social media worldwide.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Convincing statistics about the dominance of women on social media. Are you surprised?

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Anamaria Mocanu's curator insight, March 6, 2014 2:30 AM

Let's invent something for men too. :)

Carlos Polaino Jiménez's curator insight, March 6, 2014 4:09 PM

Seguro que de esto hablamos y mucho en @iAcademi

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How to leverage in-store technology to locate customers on the path to purchase

How to leverage in-store technology to locate customers on the path to purchase | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Customers want and expect a personalized experience with a brand. In fact, 81 percent of customers will pay more for a great customer experience, according to a report from Oracle. The first step toward creating that positive personalized shopping experience is knowing where the customer is in his path to a purchase in order to deliver targeted messages via the proper communication channel. 


That’s why retailers must listen to customers to know what types of messages are relevant. While a path to purchase may seem logical and easily tracked in the online shopping experience, many marketers are entirely in the dark when it comes to understanding where individual customers are in their in-store or offline shopping experience. How can retailers make sure they’re reaching customers at all times before and after a purchase in brick-and-mortar stores? The answer lies in new digital in-store technology that allows retailers to listen to what customers want and where they are on the path to purchase.

 

Each step that a customer may take before purchasing — identifying a need, researching, selecting a product and buying — aligns with a marketing opportunity. For example, when a customer researches a product, he interacts with the company’s website and may search for recommendations on social media or solicit advice from online reviews. Marketers know that those are the best channels to reach customers and the best content to move customers forward along their path to purchase.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This article outlines how 5 #instore #technologies can be used to map the customer's path to purchase.

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MediaPost Publications Why People Don't Use Smartphones to Shop 02/27/2014

MediaPost Publications Why People Don't Use Smartphones to Shop 02/27/2014 | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

There are plenty of reasons consumers use smartphones to shop, ranging from access to product information to finding competitive pricing.

And many shoppers find their own preferred path to purchase and their own reasons why.

For example, as I wrote about earlier this week, consumers use both apps and mobile websites to shop and more find mobile browsers to be more convenient (More Mobile Shoppers Like Convenience of Websites Over Apps).

Almost half (46%) of mobile shoppers say their shopping experience would be better if they could check available stock while in a store and almost a third (31%) want in-store Wi-Fi with a simple login.

But some consumers don’t use any online tools to buy, primarily because they like to shop in a store where they can see and touch their desired products.

Based on a large global study by PwC, of those who did not purchase online, here are the top reasons:

54% -- Prefer to touch/try the product52% -- Just prefer to shop in store43% -- Worried about security of personal data35% -- Don’t trust online payment methods25% -- Don’t have a credit/debit card

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Findings from recent PwC research details some barriers to using smartphones for shopping.

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The One Thing You Need To Know To Succeed With Millennial Customers

The One Thing You Need To Know To Succeed With Millennial Customers | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it
How can you create a customer experience that attracts millennial consumers? Whether you're serving millennials in retail, b2b, hospitality, finance, banking, healthcare, insurance, or another field of commerce, here's customer experience consultant Micah Solomon's advice for success
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Interesting article that introduces the concept of "digital parity" as the key to marketing success to the millennial generation of consumers.

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Inside the world of the ‘Instafamous’

Inside the world of the ‘Instafamous’ | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Shawn Megira is nothing special. He doesn’t sing in a boy band or star in a reality show. But when the 15-year-old Long Islander posts a selfie to Instagram, teenage girls freak out like they just met One Direction.

 

Megira is, to use an emerging portmanteau, “Instafamous” — a self-made micro-celebrity, known for his work on the Internet only. And like celebrities who have achieved fame through more conventional means — celebrity parents, sex tapes — his fame comes with benefits: like a sponsorship deal with L.A.-based clothing line Ambition Apparel and dozens of beaming “fans” begging for his picture. More recently, Megira was the subject of the brilliant short documentary “Instafame,” produced by the creative agency Sylvain Labs.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Another example of the power of "self-branding" on social media. This report is similar to the one that was recently aired on PBS's Frontline program entitled the "Generation Like" (see: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/generation-like/ ;).

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Laura Diamond's curator insight, December 28, 2014 7:15 PM

Instafame shows how anyone can become famous by instagram over night even with just posting a selfie. No talents needed but just watch how quickly the following base can expand over night.

 

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Study: Internet Trolls Are Also Terrible In Real Life

Study: Internet Trolls Are Also Terrible In Real Life | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Internet trolls and video game griefers are just as broken in real life as you've always suspected, according to a new psychology paper by Canadian researchers. It turns out that the same folks who love to disrupt online conversations for the "lulz" are likely to also exhibit some pretty nasty personality traits in general.

 

Two online studies led by Erin Buckels of the University of Manitoba established "strong positive associations" between "online commenting frequency, trolling enjoyment, and troll identity, pointing to a common construct underlying the measures," the researchers wrote in an abstract of their paper.

 

The upshot was that although Internet trolls are a small minority of overall Internet participants, those respondents to the team's surveys who self-identified as enjoying disrupting online communities also scored highly in the "Dark Tetrad" of personality traits, the researchers found.

 

"[T]rolling correlated positively with sadism, psychopathy, and Machiavellianism, using both enjoyment ratings and identity scores," they wrote. Which is to say, the respondents who identified themselves as trolls also indicated that they enjoy making others suffer, lack remorse and empathy, and have no problem with manipulating and lying to people to achieve their ends.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Here's the proof of what you always suspected about those trolls you encounter online. The key personality traits associated with them are sadism (the strongest), psychopathy and Machiavellianism, and narcissism, ...who would have guessed.

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31 business building benefits of Buyer Personas

31 business building benefits of Buyer Personas | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Buyer Personas are examples of the real buyers who influence or make decisions about the products, services or solutions you market. They are a tool that builds confidence in strategies to persuade buyers to choose you rather than a competitor or the status quo.

 

Buyer Personas are extremely useful for developing and evaluating messaging, content and offers that differentiate your brand from competitors. They are a foundation for any business that relies on customer acquisition, conversion and retention which, of course, is every business.

 

The best personas are created from real surveys and interviews – not from ballpark guesses, conjecture or assumptions. To get you started on creating Buyer Personas for your brand, HubSpot offers a free template:  Marketer’s Guide to Creating Buyer Personas.

 

To convince you it’s worthwhile, here are 31 business building benefits of Buyer Personas.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

An excellent discussion with examples and links behind the building and use of buyer #personas.

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How Marketers Get Inside Your Head

How Marketers Get Inside Your Head | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Much of the marketing technology vendor landscape out there includes platforms tracking customer behavior habits. When they make purchases. How. Where. A software provider out of Cambridge, Mass., believes it has the answer a question those vendor platforms can't: Why? Why do customers make purchases? What's their motivation? What are they thinking? Topic: Customer Experience.

 

TipTap Lab, a 12-employee organization, announced last week the release of what it calls Psychology API, a data collection platform that allows developers to capture and measure psychological data to personalize customer interactions. They hail it as the first API to collect complete psychological profiles of customers, including personality traits, values, expertise, tastes and preferences.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

New product that claims to enable the measurement of consumer psychological profiles and traits, such as motivation.

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Lori Wilk's curator insight, February 11, 2014 6:09 PM

Understanding what marketers do to understand your customers and all of the psychological factors which are captured and evaluated. 

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[Infographic] How Consumers Use their Devices to Find a Place to Eat

[Infographic] How Consumers Use their Devices to Find a Place to Eat | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

We recently compiled an infographic revealing new data on the online search habits of consumers during the hot summer months — focused specifically on how people are using different devices to find restaurants in their area.

We found some very interesting trends that may be of particular use to our restaurant customers.

For example:

54 percent of online menu views occur on mobile (35 percent on mobile phones; 19 percent on tablets).
Consumers spend more time per visit looking at menus on tablets (5 minutes and 2 seconds) than desktops (4m and 56s) or mobile phones (4m and 41s).The most searched-for cuisine during the summer, is seafood, followed by French cuisine.

Below is the full infographic. Learn more about how people are using their devices to find restaurants in their area. Plus, find out how you can make it easier for potential customers to find you!

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Some interesting stats about consumer search behaviors on mobile devices for restaurants. 

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The Growth of Social Media: From Passing Trend to International Obsession [Infographic] - SocialTimes

The Growth of Social Media: From Passing Trend to International Obsession [Infographic] - SocialTimes | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

While many platforms have come and gone, the growth of social media indicates that more people are catching on and using social networks to connect.

 

First there was AOL and chat rooms and Live Journal and a whole host of other social networks. Whilemany have come and gone, some more notable than others, it’s clear social networking is no passing trend.

 

For those of us who were on MySpace before it was decimated by Facebook, you know what is was like to be mocked by people who simply didn’t get it. However, a Search Engine Journal infographic aboutthe growth of social media indicates that more people are opting to use social networks to connect and communicate.

 

Since 2004, the growth of social media has been near exponential. Back in those days, Facebook — arguably the most mature of the top social networks — only had about 1 million users. By 2011 the network had grown so large, its population was being compared to that of a country. Today, Facebook has more than 1 billion registered users and Mark Zuckerberg has made connecting 5 billion more of a personal mission.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This article and infographic provides detail #statistics about the growth and ubiquity of social media since 2004. Good reference material.

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What Makes You Happy? It Depends on How Old You (Think) You Are - Knowledge@Wharton

What Makes You Happy? It Depends on How Old You (Think) You Are - Knowledge@Wharton | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

The experiences that bring happiness change as people become (or feel) older, recent Wharton research finds, creating implications for the way marketers attract certain demographics to their products.

 

The researchers soon found that age — particularly the contrasts between people hovering above or below the mid-30s mark — played a key role in what made individuals happy. “[We] refined our initial research question to examine not just which type of experience is associated with greater happiness, but to further examine when each type of experience is more closely tied to happiness,” the paper states.

 

The influence of age, Mogilner adds, made the research “more nuanced and interesting and gave us another layer of insight into when people experience happiness.”

 

After conducting eight different studies looking at a variety of influences and experiences, Mogilner and Bhattacharjee conclude that “younger people who view their future as extensive gain more happiness from extraordinary experiences.” As people get older, and more aware that their time on earth is finite, ordinary experiences become increasingly associated with happiness, and even begin to catch up to the extraordinary in the amount of joy and contentment they produce.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Research investigating the role of "self definition" and the fulfillment of experiences across lifecycle stages. Implications for the use of #socialmedia and the activities that consumers pursue.

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Apple investigating mood-based ad delivery system

Apple investigating mood-based ad delivery system | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Thursday published a peculiar Apple filing describing an ad service that targets users based on hard-to-quantify metrics like behavior and mood.

 

Apple's "Inferring user mood based on user and group characteristic data" patent application looks to offer advertisers and content providers a more intuitive and effective way to target users. 

As noted in the document, a user's responsiveness to targeted content delivery — advertisements — can be affected by any number of factors. Among these are location, time of day, current activity and mood. Apple wants to leverage user mood and mood-associated characteristic data to provide a more accurate method of ad targeting. 

In addition to mood, the system takes into account user demographics, behavior, location, time, how the ad is served, the package contents and more.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A very interesting development that appears to depend on the ability of Apple to (1) collect psychological, physical and behavioral data about web users, (2) analyze it to infer the "mood" of the user, (3) classify users into "mood categories", and then (4) deliver a relevant #advertisement to them. Sci-Fi stuff?  

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Cool or Uncool? Consumers Weigh in on Social Media Behavior

Cool or Uncool? Consumers Weigh in on Social Media Behavior | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

The latest truth study from McCann Worldgroup - "Truth About Privacy" - contains some interesting data concerning the types of online sharing behaviors and privacy practices that are considered acceptable (or not) by adults. Brands ought to be wary of overstepping boundaries: two-thirds of respondents feel that a brand’s use of their content on its social media site without permission is “uncool.” Also uncool? Brands calling with automated personalized messages, according to 57% of respondents.


Essentially, the results pertain to finding the “required balance between privacy and publicity.” Respondents consider Google and Facebook to be the most threatening companies, not surprising given the vast amounts of data they collect and – particularly with respect to Facebook – the public ways in which they can use the data. Conversely, respondents continue to trust banks the most with their sensitive personal information, likely because they don’t see the same looming prospect of those institutions making their data publicly available.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Check out the list of behaviors and the attitudes toward them. #Brands need to assess how their actions might be interpreted.

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Universal Mind Blog » Journeys: The Customer Experience Mapping Tool

Universal Mind Blog » Journeys: The Customer Experience Mapping Tool | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

I’m excited to introduce you to Journeys: The Customer Experience Mapping Tool. This iPad application is the first journey mapping tool which allows you to capture your customer’s journeys as they happen. It is designed specifically for in-the-field data capture including the ability to capture photos, videos, audio, and locations and associate them with an experience.

 

Because of Universal Mind’s focus on Customer Experience (CX), Journeys was born out of the work we were already doing with our clients. As our Strategy Practice worked to capture and organize user information in the field, we realized there was a need for a mobile tool which captured and organized this data in a way where it could be analyzed. In working with Universal Mind’s Research & Development practice, we began to create a tool for internal use.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

You knew it was going to happen sooner or later, Universal Mind has introduced the first iPad based #customerexperience mapping tool.

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Shopper in 2014 - Points of influence | warc.com

Shopper in 2014 - Points of influence | warc.com | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it
At a glance: Shopper strategies evolve

Key arguments in this article:

Shopper marketing is high on the agenda for 2014, for two reasons. First is the ongoing transformation of retail by tech; second is the growing understanding of the role emotion plays in the shopping process.

The result is a smarter understanding of consumers' purchase journeys, and the points along them at which brands can exert influence. Brands such as Frito-Lay and Mastercard are investing in research to build this knowledge.

Data from Nielsen shows how complex influence-mapping can be: two products in the same category can have very different purchase paths.

The trend toward more nuanced shopper insight is likely to accelerate as the impact of traditional in-store promotions declines. A study by IRI found that trade promotion investment has grown without driving sales volumes.

Tech expands the purchase path… 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This article does a very good job of illustrating the complexity of shopping behaviors today. The technologies available to support shopping behaviors make them complex, emotion laden and difficult to map.

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Carlos Polaino Jiménez's curator insight, March 6, 2014 4:08 PM

La configuración de los mercados con la componente digital

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Infographic: What Your Customers Really Think About Privacy - Marketing Technology Blog

Infographic: What Your Customers Really Think About Privacy - Marketing Technology Blog | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Infographic: What Your Customers Really Think About Privacy by Douglas Karr on Marketing Technology Blog

 

The media loves to drone on and on about how companies are using and abusing big data. Do consumers really care? As a marketer, my only expectation is that the data be utilized to improve the experience I receive from the brand. Sometimes that’s a bit too optimistic, but when I answer a ton of questions and then the experience isn’t personalized, I often move on. How about your customers? Do they care about how you’re utilizing the data captured at each engagement and conversion point along the way?

 

This infographic from SDL shares how marketers aren’t effectively communicating the benefits of sharing some data, while at the same time not necessarily utilizing the data they have – and there are some basics that consumers just aren’t ready to share with brands they don’t trust. Here are some key findings:

 

What do customers really think about loyalty programs? They beat out free products. 49 percent of respondents said they would give up personal information for a loyalty program, but only 41 percent would do the same for free products and services.What do customers really think about in-store tracking? They reject it. 76 percent of respondents with smartphones aren’t comfortable with retailers tracking their in-store movements.What do customers really think about mobile privacy features? They don’t use them. 72 percent of global respondents rarely or never use “Do Not Track” or “Incognito” features that would allow them to opt out of website tracking.

 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A summary of recent research by SDL about attitudes toward privacy in digital marketing environments (websites, social media) across three countries.

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Personal Data Usage Is A Matter of Trust | GreenBook

Personal Data Usage Is A Matter of Trust | GreenBook | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

A new report from the Global Research Business Network on attitudes to personal and sensitive data has revealed that 40% of UK citizens and 45% of people living in the US saying they are very concerned about how their data is used.

 

Not only is beauty in the eye of the beholder, so too it seems is the perception of what is seen as sensitive personal data by consumers and what is not.  A recent study by GRBN (Global Research Business Network – www.grbn.org) was presented at IIeX in Amsterdam and has profound implications for the market research industry.   The study consisted of over 2000 interviews conducted in early February across the United States and the United Kingdom.  The purpose of the study was to identify issues, from the consumers’ perspective, that relate to an increasingly dicey world of data privacy.   You can download the report here.


Recent revelations such as the capabilities of the NSA or data security breaches of enormous magnitude (think Target) can make even the most complacent consumer jittery about personal information floating around cyberspace.   So what did the GRBN survey find?

 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This recent research report by GRBN highlights some cross-cultural differences in attitudes towards #privacy and the usage of personal and sensitive data. Interesting implications are raised for global companies that rely on accessing "personal data".

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Online Influencers: Topics Internet Users Are Posting Their Opinions About

Online Influencers: Topics Internet Users Are Posting Their Opinions About | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

When it comes to sharing on social media sites, internet users around the world are more likely to be found sharing their opinions than news items, per a recent study from Ipsos. Now, new data publicly released by GlobalWebIndex (GWI) offers some insight into the topics that online users around the world most commonly post their opinions about. Mobile phones lead the pack, with 27% of respondents (aged 16-64) professing to have posted an opinion about them online during the month prior to the survey.

 

Next up, computers, which 23% of respondents had opined about online, with these top 2 categories highlighting the prominence of consumer technology reviews online. Those reviews are influential, too: a study last year found consumer electronics buyers more likely to rely on consumer than professional reviews.

 

Not surprisingly, entertainment is also a fixture: some 22% had posted an opinion about films, while 19% had done so about music. Books were a little further back, but were still a topic of discussion for 15%.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Interesting research findings about what users are talking about on social media. The key aspect of their conversations is that they are basically sharing opinions rather than news or facts about brands, people or other objects. Does this impersonal communication really qualify as "word-of-mouth"?

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Kirsten Jassies's curator insight, June 25, 2014 4:29 AM

Good insights, but one mistake: the beauty products are missing in this overview. I bet they are in the top 5!

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The six types of conversations on Twitter

The six types of conversations on Twitter | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

What Pew Research Center learned while taking the equivalent of aerial photographs of digital crowds.

 

"While the physical world has been mapped in great detail, the social media landscape remains mostly unknown," reads the report. "A more complete map and understanding of the social media landscape will help interpret the trends, topics, and implications of these new communication technologies."


The result? Six recurring shapes: "Polarized crowd," "tight crowd," "brand clusters," "community clusters," "broadcast network," and "support network." Each has its own specific structure, and represents a visual way of classifying the type of interactions occurring within localized parts of Twitter. Some are more obvious, such as the polarized crowd, which shows two separate groups discussing the same topic but rarely interacting. But others are more novel -- displaying complex behaviors with varying inward and outward hubs.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Research findings using NodeXL on Twitter data reveals the occurrence of six different types of conversations. No information in the article about the relative sizes of the clusters, but perhaps the full report discloses it.

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What Is Customer Experience?

What Is Customer Experience? | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

To get customer experience right, companies first need to get the definition right, according to an enlightening talk I had with Esteban Kolsky, the principal and founder of ThinkJar. He says that the digital transformation of businesses and the inbound revolution have brought about a radically different way of doing business, which has changed the meaning of thecustomer experience. Kolsky offers the following five insights into how the customer experience is being redefined.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Thought provoking article that offers up five key ways customer experiences  (#CX) with #brands are changing. How many of these do brand managers watch? 

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Patrice Laubignat's curator insight, February 15, 2014 5:41 AM

Lire aussi mon commentaire sur le blog www.marketingemotionnel.com

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Journeys, Not Touchpoints - Business 2 Community

Journeys, Not Touchpoints - Business 2 Community | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

The customer experience is just that, a journey.


What does that mean? It means that, while it’s important to look at the individual touchpoints, moments of truth, interactions, channels, etc., it’s more important to remember the whole journey, the entire experience that the customer has with your brand or organization as he’s trying to do whatever job it is he’s trying to do.

Focusing on the entire journey, not solely on individual touchpoints, will yield greater results for the customer experience, i.e., it ‘s much better for the customer. When you just consider touchpoints and single moments of truth, you’re focusing on transactional relationships, not on trusted, long-lasting relationships.

Clients often ask if it’s OK to only listen to customers at, and improve the experience with, the customer service touchpoint (or any other singular touchpoint). My answer is “No.” Why? Because the customer experience isn’t about just one touchpoint, it’s about all of the touchpoints, all of the interactions, that a customer has with a company. And, for added emphasis, I like to share Chris Zane’s quote:

Customer service starts where customer experience fails.

 

Then there are those companies who listen at various touchpoints, think that their customers are happy, and yet still have dismal retention rates. What’s going on there? Well, the sum of the individual touchpoints does not necessarily equal the whole. The key here is “individual.” Companies are looking at these touchpoints through their silos rather than looking at the big picture and thinking about the customer journey and how all the points connect and interact.

I recently came across a report published by McKinsey that supports this thinking. Of all the content in the report, I particularly liked this chart below that shows that customer journeys are better predictors of key business outcomes than touchpoints.

The report states that companies that focus on customer journeys have the following attributes:

Metrics are defined for the journey as well as for the touchpointsThose journey metrics – not just metrics in their control – are shared with the frontlineData cubes bring together business outcomes, attitudinal, behavioral, and operations data for root cause analysisRoot-cause problem solving is conducted within and across functionsThey conduct active tests, e.g., create mini labs to test solutions in cross-siloed environments, and understand the value of failuresA common language is used to reinforce the values of a journey-oriented culture



Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Annette Franz presents a strong case for the conceptualization of a "#customerjourney" as a collection of "#touchpoints". The analytic value comes from the holistic treatment of the collection as a single "unit of analysis" that potentially integrates the customer experience (#CX) across devices, platforms and channels.

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Eye Tracking 101: How Your Eyes Move on a Website

Eye Tracking 101: How Your Eyes Move on a Website | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Engage website visitors better by designing your site to match how people's eyes move on the page. Here are some surprising eye tracking stats to help.

 

Putting together a great looking website is a great start, but it is just a start.

 

True web design requires you to venture beyond the aesthetic and into the worlds of User Experience and Conversion Rate Optimization.

Knowing how the viewers of your site really see it can help to shine light on new and/or missed opportunities within your current design. It may also bring out the need for new elements or changes.

 

While there are plenty of options for improving CRO, eye tracking analysis provides some of the most useful information for optimizing your biggest digital marketing asset, your website.

 

A good design will catch people’s eye, but a great design will keep people on your site and get them engaged with your content. And while you shouldn’tunderestimate the power of good copy, your design is what people notice first.

 

We teamed up with our friends over at Single Grain to put together the infographic below in hopes that it will help everyone get a better, basic understanding of what eye tracking is and what it can do.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Validation of the importance that visual and verbal communications elements play in #website design. 

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Steve Baker's curator insight, February 19, 2014 7:37 AM

Designing clean, effective websites that work and deliver clients 

Mike Milazzo's curator insight, February 21, 2014 10:09 AM

When we get past all the ads.

Gonzalo Moreno's curator insight, February 22, 2014 6:55 AM

One of my students' favorite topics... XD

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Why The Web Needs Human Content Curation [INFOGRAHIC]

Why The Web Needs Human Content Curation [INFOGRAHIC] | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

We are living in a sea of information. Content marketing has become the buzz word in every marketing strategy.

Although content marketing is nothing new it has never been easier to create and publish content.

Which has lead to a dramatic rise in the amount of content we consume.

Google’s Executive Chairman, Eric Schmidt, stated that: “Every two days we now create as much information as we did from the dawn of civilisation up until 2003.”

That’s an enormous amount of data, and a large amount of that data is surplus to requirement.

Search is Not Enough

When we search the web we are looking for specific information. The search engines are doing their best to help us find the best and most relevant stuff.

But like all automated processes they can only do so much.

Continually gamed Head of Google’s Search Spam team, Matt Cutts, has a fight on his hands to return the “good stuff”. In a recent statement Matt even suggested even guest blogging may not be a good practice.

There is one thing Matt Cutts and Google are for and that is value added content curation. The reason is that curation helps filter the web.

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Gonzalo Moreno's curator insight, February 22, 2014 6:58 AM

I usually love infographies, but this one, specifically, is just TOO GOOD!

Scooped by Russ Merz, Ph.D.
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A Behavioral Manifesto: Measuring and Managing Customer Experience and Loyalty | CustomerThink

A Behavioral Manifesto: Measuring and Managing Customer Experience and Loyalty | CustomerThink | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Marketers and voice-of-the-customer (VoC) champions of the world, unite! You have nothing to lose but your shackles of outdated theories and measurements.

 

Despite the stir about behavioral economics turning traditional economics on its head, we all know that the first behavioral economists were marketers—the people charged with understanding and influencing the behavior of consumers. These are the people who said the product and market conditions are a given; now we just need to re-brand, re-position, re-package, re-message, re-target … re-whatever to get people to buy what we have.

 

Most approaches to measuring customer loyalty and experiences, understanding the levers or drivers of loyalty and satisfaction, and creating strategies and tactics for improving performance, however, remain largely encrusted in the outdated thinking of traditional economics. It’s time to cast off those chains and explore what behavioral economics means for measuring and managing customer loyalty and experience.

 

 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This article thoughtfully addresses 11 fallacies related to the measurement and management of customer experience and loyalty that all market researchers should keep in mind. There are some real gems revealed by the author such as "explanations for our actions are mainly after-the-fact rationalizations", and "memory trumps experience", among others. Definitely worth reading and frequently referencing in the future.


 

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The 6 Pieces of the Customer Experience Puzzle

The 6 Pieces of the Customer Experience Puzzle | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

How do you define customer experience — and, more importantly, how do you create the best customer experience model?

 

I started wondering about both concepts while working on an assignment to increase sales from the digital channel of a hospitality giant.

 

It seems like everyone is interested in the idea of “great customer experiences." But both businesses and scholars have struggled to understand what that really means, and have fared even worse at attempts to measure the outcomes of the "Customer Experience."


My suggestion: Divide the customer experience into six dimensions that can work cohesively to improve the requisite "experience" to customers, provide competitive differentiation and even affect the bottom line.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A useful way to conceptualize the competencies needed to delivery #customerexperiences that matter.

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Dan Brody's curator insight, February 7, 2014 8:53 AM

Customer Experience broken done into 6 easy to understand segments. @yieldtech can help improve your customer experience.