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Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments
The Identification, measurement and analysis of consumer types, perceptions, attitudes, and activities in digital environments.
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How Image Recognition Can Improve Brand Insights Into Consumer Behavior - PSFK

How Image Recognition Can Improve Brand Insights Into Consumer Behavior - PSFK | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Brands can now learn more about their customers via images than ever before.

 

Earlier this month we documented a new startup named Curalate that offers image analytics that is able to determine whether a post on social media will gain likes, comments and shares. Now their investors are on the hunt for a slicker model.

Apu Gupta and his co-founder and CTO Nick Shiftan started with an idea that would enable brands to get involved with Pinterest in a more calculated, meaningful way by offering a service that would analyze Pins for their potential to expose campaigns and products. As Gupta began to write the code, he realized many people don’t use text on Pinterest as they do on other social media sites and therefore needed to figure out a way to specifically analyze images on their own.

 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Interesting development in the field of #visualanalytics. Clearly Curalate's technology will be very useful for understanding how brand images affect consumer behaviors. This capability can help assess the relative "quality" of visual images. Stay tuned.

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Data's Role in the Online Path to Purchase - Marketing Technology Blog

Data's Role in the Online Path to Purchase - Marketing Technology Blog | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

There are dozens of points on the path to purchase where retailers can collect and use data to enhance the shopping experience and turn browsers into buyers. But there is so much data that it can become easy to focus on the wrong things and veer off course. For example, 21% of consumers abandon their cartsimply because the checkout process is inefficient. +

The path to purchase has dozens of points where retailers can collect valuable data, enhance the shopping experience, and convert browsers into buyers. But beware: tThe volume of data can be overwhelming, and it’s easy to veer off course. By steering clear of “data detours”, retailers can focus on actionable data to drive customers across the finish line.

Baynote released an infographic Data’s Role in the Online Path to Purchase providing insight into the most important and actionable data and the detours that can lead retailers astray.+

 

 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Infographic summary of the role data plays in understanding the consumer's #digital path to purchase.

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How Women and Men Use Social Media and Mobile Differently - Marketing Technology Blog

How Women and Men Use Social Media and Mobile Differently - Marketing Technology Blog | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

How Women and Men Use Social Media and Mobile Differently by Douglas Karr on Marketing Technology Blog

 

Did you know that women are more likely to play games on their smartphone, more likely to like a brand to get deals and more likely to utilize mobile and social media to keep tabs on family and communicate with one another? +

The gender difference revolves around three distinct areas: our personal and professional relationships, the need for information and entertainment, and consumer behavior. On that note, we prepared this infographic based on those parameters for a broader look at how men and women differ. There are distinct variances. For instance, men are more likely to use social media for business and dating, while women for relationships, sharing, entertainment, and self-help.

Understanding your audience is key when you’re developing content – so recognizing what content may resonate with the gender you’re trying to attract is imperative… this infographic from FinancesOnline.com details some of the key differences.

 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Recent #stats on #gender differences in the use of #socialmedia and #mobile devices. Good reference material worth keeping, especially if you need to win any arguments...

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The power of visual communication (Infographic) | dotRising

The power of visual communication (Infographic) | dotRising | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it
A picture is worth a thousand words - and marketers are fast realising that visual communication is worth thousands of pounds.
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A historical and stylistic review of visual communication techniques. Good reference value.

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Puppies and the Titanic: The Science of Emotion in Marketing via @Buffer - Search Engine Journal

Puppies and the Titanic: The Science of Emotion in Marketing via @Buffer - Search Engine Journal | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Every day it seems like we feel hundreds of different emotions – each nuanced and specific to the physical and social situations we find ourselves in.

According to science, it’s not that complicated by a long shot. A new study says we’re really only capable of four “basic” emotions: happy, sad, afraid/surprised, and angry/disgusted.

But much like the “mother sauces” of cooking allow you to make pretty much any kind of food under the sun, these four “mother emotions” meld together in myriad ways in our brains to create our layered emotional stews.

Robert Plutchik’s famous “wheel of emotions” shows just some of the well known emotional layers.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This is a very handy overview of some of the thinking behind emotion and its use in marketing. It does a good job of covering the basics.

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Infographic: Six psychological theories of social commerce | MyCustomer

Infographic: Six psychological theories of social commerce | MyCustomer | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

How do you use the psychology of shopping to optimise your social commerce?

 

Psychologists have defined six universal heuristics (mental rules of thumb) that are evident in shoppers.

 

This infographic by social commerce experts TabJuice reveals how consumers make their purchase decisions, and how retailers can use this information to optimise their social commerce. (click to enlarge)

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

How do you make purchase decisions?

 

Here are an interesting set of shopping decision-making approaches.

 

Do you use all of these approaches or only some?

What shopping conditions best determine their use?

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Ken Schneider's curator insight, May 12, 8:15 PM

Don't You Just Love Science! ... shows that despite technology deep down we're still a troop of social apes. #bonobosnotchimps

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Women, Men and the Future of Science

Women, Men and the Future of Science | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Overall, men have a more positive outlook than women have when it comes to the impact of future technological and scientific developments. But there are some nuances when you drill down to specifics - like women and men's attitudes on lab-grown meat, wearable technologies and brain implants.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

An interesting read of recent findings reported by Pew Research comparing the attitudes and orientations of men and women toward technological change. 

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Friends, and Influence, for Sale Online

Friends, and Influence, for Sale Online | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it
By using social media bots, celebrities, politicians and others can falsely inflate the number of friends and followers they have, possibly swaying public opinion about a new song — or a policy position.
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This article, about the creation of phony "friends" and "followers" with snippets of software called "bots" is raising serious questions about the efficacy of data extracted from social media networks. From a #marketingresearch perspective the use of data derived from #socialmedia has to be suspect given the very real possibility that it isn't real, and is not easily "cleaned". Clearly the bot threat can cause serious issues of misrepresentation such as sample error as well as measurement error...#MR user beware!

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How to Get Real Neuromarketing Insights | Testing & Usability

How to Get Real Neuromarketing Insights | Testing & Usability | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Before dismissing your great idea for the next campaign, ad, or website landing page, make sure you don't rely solely on qualitative data. By incorporating current neuroscience studies and other qualitative data to form hypotheses, you can begin testing these hypotheses thoroughly and interpreting the results to maximize your conversion optimization and create your next breakthrough campaign.

 

A few years ago, Frito-Lay spot-tested an ad featuring two women in a laundromat. One woman callously steals the only available washing machine. Frustrated, the other exacts her revenge: she dumps Cheetos into the thief's dryer full of white clothes.

 

Focus groups hated the ad and criticized it as mean-spirited. Judging from their emotional reactions, marketers thought the spot might yield negative brand associations if aired. But in a different kind of test group — one in which participants had electroencephalogram (EEG) sensors strapped to their heads — it evoked an extremely positive response. According to the group's brain activity, women found the ad particularly hilarious, even if they weren't saying so.

 

Frito-Lay decided to place its faith in brain scans and air the ad. The "Orange Underground" campaign went on to help NeuroFocus, the company that conducted the EEG research, earn a Grand Ogilvy award. (Since then, NeuroFocus has become a Nielsen subsidiary.)

 

Frito-Lay isn't the only multinational to invest in neuromarketing research. Intel, PepsiCo, and Google have all paid millions for a peek into their customers' brains. And as the technology becomes more portable and powerful, more than 100 neuromarketing companies have sprung up worldwide.

 

Offering unprecedented access to a futuristic kind of consumer data, the neuromarketing revolution is in full swing. Amidst all the sci-fi excitement, however, much of the marketing world is forgetting to ask a key question: How can we effectively use this data?

 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

As the author of this article points out, there are two steps to get past the hype surrounding #neuromarketing. First, it is important to understand the limitations surrounding it, and then second, maximize its value by doing some basic hypothesis testing. 

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Different Customers, Different Prices, Thanks To Big Data

Different Customers, Different Prices, Thanks To Big Data | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Big data is helping companies price goods according to a
customer's willingness to pay. Firms, seeing green but fearing
a public backlash, are treading carefully.

 

Many firms consider targeted coupons to be the most effective way to implement differential pricing, rather than risk stirring up resentment by using surcharges. “As long as things are presented in the form of a discount for your special behavior, people accept it,” said Tim Smith, founder of pricing consulting firm Wiglaf Pricing in Chicago.

 

Kostick of 100% Pure acknowledges it is a tricky dance: “We don’t want to cross the line where we upset our customers, but we still want to capture the customers that are not going to buy.”

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Price discrimination capabilities on e-commerce websites are gaining traction with the development of big data based predictive analytics algorithms. This article presents a case study and overview of the practice.

 

How are consumers likely to respond?

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Retail Transaction Data Suggests Frequent Shoppers Arent Necessarily Loyal Ones

Retail Transaction Data Suggests Frequent Shoppers Arent Necessarily Loyal Ones | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

A frequent customer is not always a loyal one, says Cardlytics in a new study [pdf] based on a “whole-wallet” analysis of transaction records held by consumers’ banks for nearly 70% of US households. The research indicates that customers who frequently visit specific retailers tend to be heavy category spenders, meaning that they also frequently visit other retailers in the same category. Instead, true loyalty is often the domain of “light customers,” who make fewer trips to stores but typically shop at the same ones.

 

The analysis looked at 5 retailer categories: restaurants; apparel; gas and convenience; grocery; and general retail. Rather than simply analyze how often customers of these categories visit specific stores (which might be how the stores themselves determine loyalty), the whole-wallet approach based on transaction records looks at how often customers visit stores as a percentage of their total category visits.


In each case, “light” customers were more loyal than “heavy” customers.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

The results of a recent study that once again (because it has been studied before) dashes naïve beliefs about customer loyalty. However, while interesting, the results are only based on behaviors and neglect the attitudinal aspect of loyalty.

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Consumers demand better customer care in digital era and a quarter take more than a year to forgive mistakes, report says

Consumers demand better customer care in digital era and a quarter take more than a year to forgive mistakes, report says | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

UK Consumers have become more demanding and more easily disappointed despite their access to brands and companies vastly improving with the development of digital technology, a study has shown.

The report from customer experience management firm Thunderhead surveyed more than 2,000 consumers and interviewed senior customer executives from 33 businesses. The findings concluded that nearly a quarter of people (24 per cent) said they would take more than a year to forgive a company if it had somehow broken their trust, while 23 per cent said they would never trust the company again.

In addition, more than half (52 per cent) said there had been no improvement in their relationships with businesses over the last three years, and a quarter said they had worsened. Of the people surveyed, nearly a this (30 per cent) said they would share a bad experience online, on the phone or in person, and the report concluded that on average a negative experience would be shared with around 18 people.

“Marketing has become a highly sophisticated and business-critical operation that looks beyond customer acquisition and with this has grown in its importance to organisations,” the report stated. “However, with greater profile comes increased scrutiny also. Unfortunately, as our research suggests, the reality is that too often investment in the customer relationship is undermined by a lack of focus on customer engagement.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This article provides some important caveats to businesses that think they are providing good customer services. Time for a reevaluation of customer care practices. Better customer knowledge, speed, and quality interactions needed to build #trust for existing customers. 

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Survey: Consumers Ready For Indoor Location, Marketing

Survey: Consumers Ready For Indoor Location, Marketing | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

A new consumer survey by “iBeacon marketing platform” provider Swirl, which works with specialty retailers such as Alexi and Ani and Timberland, shows that consumers are ready for indoor location and marketing. Industry and retailer fears about consumer acceptance of indoor location tracking may thus be overblown.

 

It is true that consumers are concerned about who has access to their location data in the abstract. However when they receive clear value for sharing it they’re more than comfortable with doing so. 

According to the Swirl survey of 1,000 US adults, 85 percent of consumers have used some sort of mobile shopping app while in stores. Among those apps are a mix of different functions and content:

 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This article provides some recent research findings that seem to support the readiness of consumers to participate in #location-based marketing activities (#hyperlocal). The key is for retailers and others using the technology to build trust by communicating the benefits of participation to the consumer. That's not too difficult is it?

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Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn – What Happens To Your Online Presence When You Die? [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter

Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn – What Happens To Your Online Presence When You Die? [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn – What Happens To Your Online Presence When You Die? [INFOGRAPHIC]

 

Do you realise, that everyone you know, someday, will die?

And I hate to be the one to break it to you, but at some point – hopefully in the distant, distant future – you’re going to leave this mortal coil, too.*

 

So here’s the big question: what happens to our social media profiles when we cease to exist?

 

Consider this: in the first eight years of its existence, 30 million Facebook users died.

 

30 million.


But that’s just the start. If the social network stops growing, the number of people who will have died “on Facebook” will surpass the living by 2065.

 

Add Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Google and every other social platform into the mix and we could be looking at billions of virtual tombs.

 

You think your social media profile is dead now? Just wait until you’ve actually died.

This visual from WebpageFX looks at what happens to your online presence when you die.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Probably not a topic of great popularity, but certainly a pertinent one for everybody. Clear legal implications.

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The Psychology of Sharing [Infographic]

The Psychology of Sharing [Infographic] | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

What types of people are most likely to share content online? And why are they sharing it?

 

The following infographic by StatPro categorizes people into six types of sharers: hipsters, careerists, altruists, connectors, boomerangs, and selectives.

 

Careerists are sharers who "are savvy business networkers and are more likely to share content on LinkedIn," states StatPro, whereas altruists "are helpful, reliable, thoughtful, connected, and only use email to share."

The group that use social networks and emails are selectives, who are "resourceful, careful, and thoughtful." However, hipsters are the least likely of the groups to use email.

The reasons people share online content are various, but the main reason is "value and entertainment."


Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

An interesting compendium of the 6 types of #sharing behaviors and modes of sharing on social media and other interactive forms of digital media.

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Maryse Rebillot's curator insight, June 6, 3:50 AM

A good overview of the different behavioural types in digital sharing. It may lead to an additional segmentation item to better reach and engage your target.

StickyCommunication's curator insight, June 23, 4:08 AM

Interesting article on the psychology of sharing. It is good to have in mind when creating the content, whether people will find it entertaining or compelling enough to share it with their network. This article will help you form these thoughts before sending out useless content!

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Silver Surfers: How The Older Generation Uses Social Media [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter

Silver Surfers: How The Older Generation Uses Social Media [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Silver Surfers: How The Older Generation Uses Social Media [INFOGRAPHIC]

 

Did you know that one in three seniors now use social media?

That’s up from just 13 percent in 2009. Almost one in five (18 percent) Twitter users are aged 50 or over, and a whopping 49 percent of online seniors have a Facebook account.

This visual from Accredited Online Colleges looks at internet usage amongst the older generation.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Social media usage by older demographic groups. Useful reference material.

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Women and Social Media Go Hand-in-Hand When Shopping Locally

Women and Social Media Go Hand-in-Hand When Shopping Locally | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Local Media Watch provides the latest news, events and updates happening in the local media space.

 

We have already learned that men are heavily engaged with their mobile devices in my first blog postregarding BIA/Kelsey’s recent spotlight deck comparing the male vs. female consumer, but what about women?


When it comes to local shopping, female consumers interact much more on social media than their male counterparts. According to BIA/Kelsey’s Consumer Commerce Monitor™, 49.1% of females interact with or use social media regarding local purchases compared to only 37% of males. Seventy-one percent of women cite Facebook as their preferred social media site for local shopping. Women also strongly value the opinions of the Facebook Friends with 51.9% considering them to be a trustworthy or very trustworthy source of information for local products and services. Men were not as quick to trust their Facebook Friends with only 44% considering them to be a trustworthy or very trust worthy source.

 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Stats on the use of #socialmedia for shopping purposes. 

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Lindsey Lindgren's curator insight, May 18, 1:05 PM

Window Shopping to a whole new level.

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84% of female Pinterest users are still active in their fourth year: stats

84% of female Pinterest users are still active in their fourth year: stats | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

In terms of user retention, this is an incredible figure. Especially compared to the competition.

 

In February 2014, I looked at Google+ and discovered that although it had 1.15bn users, only 35% of those were active monthly. Similarly 36% of Twitter’s registered users are active on a monthly basis.

 

Facebook fairs a lot better, a recent GWI Social report reveals a global account ownership figure of 83%, of which 49% are active and 56% of users log in more than once a day.

 

Of course social channels are very reluctant to reveal their true figures for active users, so its up to third party studies to estimate this and just because your regularly using Twitter right now doesn’t mean you won’t still be doing so in four years time. Which is why the headline figure for Pinterest is so encouraging.

 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

The findings from a recent Pinterest user study shows vast differences in usage between women and men on the curation social media network.  What are the reasons for the differences?

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AFreeman's curator insight, May 14, 8:14 PM

Great info

Lindsey Lindgren's curator insight, May 18, 1:08 PM

We'll pin it all and share it all with the world..power of women.

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Survey Analytics Blog: Top 5 Infographics of the Week: Social Media Demographics

Survey Analytics Blog: Top 5 Infographics of the Week: Social Media Demographics | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it
Whether or not we like to admit it, social media has become a huge part of our lives. That is why we were so interested in learning about the demographics of social media users.
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A collection of 5 infographics highlighting different aspects of social media demography. Good reference material.

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malek's curator insight, May 4, 7:14 AM

a good collection in one page

Sherin Nicolson's curator insight, May 5, 10:01 PM

This is such a big insight into what the market is doing in todays cluttered technological world. This can help marketers break through that clutter and target these audiences through the means of technology that they are more inclined to use and relate to more. This also encourages research of IMC campaigns to move forward with their thinking as the technological advances are moving even more rapidly and quickly. The industry has changed rapidly because of technology and we as marketers cannot afford to ignore this. 

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How Men and Women Use Mobile and Social Media Differently (Infographic)

How Men and Women Use Mobile and Social Media Differently (Infographic) | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

As the old saying goes, men are from Mars and women are from Venus.

An infographic from FinancesOnline.com gives that theory a bit more weight. The graphic illustrates the different ways the genders use social media and mobile.

 

For example, men are more likely to use social media for business and dating, whereas women are more likely to use it for relationships, sharing and entertainment.

 

But the differences don't end there.

 

Did you know that men prefer quick access to deals and information on social media, whereas women would rather have an encounter with a brand? And while only 18 percent of men will follow an organization for deals, 71 percent of women will.

 

But there are some aspects of social media on which both genders agree: Both enjoy social media ads that are funny or feature celebrity endorsements. (Hey, it's something, right?)

 

Learn more about how men and women use social media in the infographic. 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Some useful comparative stats about difference across genders regarding #mobile and #socialmedia use.

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LuceCEM's curator insight, April 24, 7:54 AM

Interesante artículo sobre las diferencias en el Uso del `Social Media´ entre hombres y mujeres

Mai Lam's curator insight, April 27, 5:59 AM

This article states that women and men have different ways of using social media and mobile. It reveals women tend to rely on social media and mobile for relationship, sharing and entertainment purposes where as men use social media for business and dating reasons. Furthermore, Men are more likely to scan coupons or QR codes than women, in contrast, women tend to follow a brand for deals/sales. This article is relevant to IMC as it can be a source or an idea for a company to focus on a targeted market where they can endorse their products or services instead of aiming for a broad market. 

Inside Market Strategy's curator insight, May 16, 5:38 PM

Very interesting.

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Music analytics is helping the music industry see into the future

Music analytics is helping the music industry see into the future | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

The internet is taking power away from record labels but it’s also giving them the ability to predict future hits.

 

The world’s listening habits were once relatively private.

Music lovers declared their allegiances with posters, festival wristbands and physical copies of the music they loved. But when listeners retreated to the safety of their bedrooms, they could indulge in guilty pleasures without Last.fm or Spotify telling the rest of the planet.

 

Record companies were aware which radio station played their songs and where their CDs were popular, but that information painted an incomplete picture at best. Who knew what music people were sharing on tapes and CDs burnt in the privacy of their own bedrooms?

 

“The traditional metrics like sales told us a record or CD was sold, but nothing about what happened after that,” says Paul Smernicki, director of digital at Universal Music UK.

 

That’s all changed. The explosion of data from sources like torrenting, music streaming sites and social media platforms has offered the music industry a huge opportunity to understand their fans and spot upcoming artists like never before. Music analytics is now worth an estimated £1.8 billion per year.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Will the future of music production and talent scouting be embodied in an #algorithm? The emerging business of #music #analytics.

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Sherin Nicolson's curator insight, April 13, 3:29 AM

The marketing industry is ever-changing because of new and evolving technological advances. This shows you need to communicate to the next generation in new and innovative ways. Tradition is phasing out and new technology is the future!

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The Psychology Behind the Successful Liking and Sharing of Social Media Images

The Psychology Behind the Successful Liking and Sharing of Social Media Images | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

That the pictures posted on Nike’s Facebook page receive thousands of shares each should come as no surprise. With a potential reach of nearly 17 million, the company has a huge audience only a small fraction of which need to see, like or share an image for Nike to have engagement figures in the thousands.

What is surprising though is that some images do so much better than others.

 

The image above, for example, was posted on Nike’s timeline in August 2013 and was one of the most successful the company has placed on Facebook. It garnered over 80,000 likes and nearly 6,500 shares. A different image posted at the end of the year showing joggers running towards a beautiful sunset however, generated fewer than 6,500 likes and just over 850 shares.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A very interesting article about how emotional responses to images influence the likelihood to like and share them. The research findings suggest a narrow range of responses are most effective.

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#twothumbsup: Moviegoing at a Theater Near You

#twothumbsup: Moviegoing at a Theater Near You | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

In the Siskel and Ebert era, two thumbs up didn’t just mean that a movie was good. It also meant the movie was worth seeing. Times have changed, and today, movie critics—professional and self-proclaimed—are using their thumbs in other ways to influence moviegoing decisions. Through tweets, hashtags and even photos, moviegoers are broadening the in-theater experience well beyond the theater itself.

Although reviews from modern film critics may have more competition due to the rise of social media, they still have an important place in the moviegoing decision-making process. In fact, according to Nielsen’s 2013 American Moviegoing report, 41 percent of Millennials said they check the average critic rating on websites, such as Rotten Tomatoes and IMDb, before attending a movie. In addition, eight out of 10 moviegoers still refer to movie reviews at least some of the time when they’re considering what films to see.

But let’s be honest: It should come as no surprise that the art of writing and sharing movie reviews has become more organic. With the growth of social media and the Internet, being “in the know” about the latest films is an important aspect of social relevancy. Before heading to the movies, about 44 percent of moviegoers say they trust trailers as a source of information when deciding whether or not to see a film. At nearly the same level, 40 percent say they value recommendations they see posted by their friends or family on social media. And after they’ve cheered, cried or jumped out of their seats, moviegoers are turning to social media to give their own thumbs up… or down.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Recent Nielsen research finds that online movie #reviews trump #socialmedia for influencing movie choices.

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When Are Consumers Willing to Share Personal Info With Brands?

When Are Consumers Willing to Share Personal Info With Brands? | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Most consumers (62%) say they worry about how their personal information is being used by marketers, according to a recent report from SDL.

 

Older consumers are more likely to worry about data and privacy issues than younger consumers, the survey of more than 4,000 people in three countries (the US, UK, and Australia) found:

 

—In the United States, 59% of consumers age 18-29 worry about data privacy, compared with 71% of consumers age 45-60.

—In the United Kingdom, only 48% of consumers 18-24 worry, compared with 63% of those age 45-54.

 

However, consumers are much less concerned with sharing data with trusted brands, SDL also found: 79% of respondents say they are more likely to provide personal information to a brand they have purchased from before.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Recent research across three countries identifies some of the conditions when consumers are willing to share information with marketers.

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Freda Lim's curator insight, May 15, 5:55 PM

I would be one of the consumers when it comes who worry about giving my personal details especially when I don't know what they intend to use it for. Sometimes you give it but don't intend to receive any mailers or email, which fills up my inbox quite quickly. Most of the time I just delete or ignore it without taking in any notice. But when it comes to signing up to loyalty programs, I'd be one of those consumers who are willing to provide personal information in order to receive good deals and points with every purchase I make.

Scooped by Russ Merz, Ph.D.
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People Aren't Always Honest About Their Locations

People Aren't Always Honest About Their Locations | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

As a marketer, you’ve mastered location-based marketing. Your pizza is hot, it’s lunchtime, and you’ve pinpointed those smartphone-carrying consumers who are in spitting distance of your store. But what if your target consumers aren’t where they claim to be?

 

Social ad platform 140 Proof, which uses people’s public social network activities such as their location, what they share and who they follow to target them with ads, did some research on the difference between people’s stated locations and their actual ones. Guess what? People aren’t always where they say they are. Here's their blog post on the topic.

 

In a concept it’s dubbed “geographic drift,” in major cities like New York and L.A., there are many people who self-identify as being from those cities who actually live in a broad area around them. (In 140 Proof's map shown here, the yellow border indicates the actual city while the area in blue shows where self-proclaimed New Yorkers or Angelenos actually are.)

 

140 Proof has some theories about why this is. Some have to do with convenience (New York is more recognizable than Bridgeport; commuting makes drift possible). But there’s also an aspirational, or vanity, factor.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Error in self reported metrics is not a new thing, but clearly measurement validity is an issue for #location-based marketers relying on this type of data.

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