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Summation: Cre-8-TVT will trump systems thinking

Summation: Cre-8-TVT will trump systems thinking | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it
The Right Brain Revolution Over the next 100 years, the importance of creativity will trump systems thinking due to the rapidly escalating power of computers. No, I’m not talking about an apocalyptic “Rise of the Machines,” but rather about the...
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A thought provoking discussion about the increasing importance of creative thinking. The true source of "awesomeness". Take the test at the end of the article to see if you are right or left brain dominant.

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Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments
The Identification, measurement and analysis of consumer types, perceptions, attitudes, and activities in digital environments.
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Music analytics is helping the music industry see into the future

Music analytics is helping the music industry see into the future | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

The internet is taking power away from record labels but it’s also giving them the ability to predict future hits.

 

The world’s listening habits were once relatively private.

Music lovers declared their allegiances with posters, festival wristbands and physical copies of the music they loved. But when listeners retreated to the safety of their bedrooms, they could indulge in guilty pleasures without Last.fm or Spotify telling the rest of the planet.

 

Record companies were aware which radio station played their songs and where their CDs were popular, but that information painted an incomplete picture at best. Who knew what music people were sharing on tapes and CDs burnt in the privacy of their own bedrooms?

 

“The traditional metrics like sales told us a record or CD was sold, but nothing about what happened after that,” says Paul Smernicki, director of digital at Universal Music UK.

 

That’s all changed. The explosion of data from sources like torrenting, music streaming sites and social media platforms has offered the music industry a huge opportunity to understand their fans and spot upcoming artists like never before. Music analytics is now worth an estimated £1.8 billion per year.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Will the future of music production and talent scouting be embodied in an #algorithm? The emerging business of #music #analytics.

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Sherin Nicolson's curator insight, April 13, 12:29 AM

The marketing industry is ever-changing because of new and evolving technological advances. This shows you need to communicate to the next generation in new and innovative ways. Tradition is phasing out and new technology is the future!

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The Psychology Behind the Successful Liking and Sharing of Social Media Images

The Psychology Behind the Successful Liking and Sharing of Social Media Images | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

That the pictures posted on Nike’s Facebook page receive thousands of shares each should come as no surprise. With a potential reach of nearly 17 million, the company has a huge audience only a small fraction of which need to see, like or share an image for Nike to have engagement figures in the thousands.

What is surprising though is that some images do so much better than others.

 

The image above, for example, was posted on Nike’s timeline in August 2013 and was one of the most successful the company has placed on Facebook. It garnered over 80,000 likes and nearly 6,500 shares. A different image posted at the end of the year showing joggers running towards a beautiful sunset however, generated fewer than 6,500 likes and just over 850 shares.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A very interesting article about how emotional responses to images influence the likelihood to like and share them. The research findings suggest a narrow range of responses are most effective.

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#twothumbsup: Moviegoing at a Theater Near You

#twothumbsup: Moviegoing at a Theater Near You | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

In the Siskel and Ebert era, two thumbs up didn’t just mean that a movie was good. It also meant the movie was worth seeing. Times have changed, and today, movie critics—professional and self-proclaimed—are using their thumbs in other ways to influence moviegoing decisions. Through tweets, hashtags and even photos, moviegoers are broadening the in-theater experience well beyond the theater itself.

Although reviews from modern film critics may have more competition due to the rise of social media, they still have an important place in the moviegoing decision-making process. In fact, according to Nielsen’s 2013 American Moviegoing report, 41 percent of Millennials said they check the average critic rating on websites, such as Rotten Tomatoes and IMDb, before attending a movie. In addition, eight out of 10 moviegoers still refer to movie reviews at least some of the time when they’re considering what films to see.

But let’s be honest: It should come as no surprise that the art of writing and sharing movie reviews has become more organic. With the growth of social media and the Internet, being “in the know” about the latest films is an important aspect of social relevancy. Before heading to the movies, about 44 percent of moviegoers say they trust trailers as a source of information when deciding whether or not to see a film. At nearly the same level, 40 percent say they value recommendations they see posted by their friends or family on social media. And after they’ve cheered, cried or jumped out of their seats, moviegoers are turning to social media to give their own thumbs up… or down.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Recent Nielsen research finds that online movie #reviews trump #socialmedia for influencing movie choices.

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When Are Consumers Willing to Share Personal Info With Brands?

When Are Consumers Willing to Share Personal Info With Brands? | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Most consumers (62%) say they worry about how their personal information is being used by marketers, according to a recent report from SDL.

 

Older consumers are more likely to worry about data and privacy issues than younger consumers, the survey of more than 4,000 people in three countries (the US, UK, and Australia) found:

 

—In the United States, 59% of consumers age 18-29 worry about data privacy, compared with 71% of consumers age 45-60.

—In the United Kingdom, only 48% of consumers 18-24 worry, compared with 63% of those age 45-54.

 

However, consumers are much less concerned with sharing data with trusted brands, SDL also found: 79% of respondents say they are more likely to provide personal information to a brand they have purchased from before.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Recent research across three countries identifies some of the conditions when consumers are willing to share information with marketers.

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People Aren't Always Honest About Their Locations

People Aren't Always Honest About Their Locations | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

As a marketer, you’ve mastered location-based marketing. Your pizza is hot, it’s lunchtime, and you’ve pinpointed those smartphone-carrying consumers who are in spitting distance of your store. But what if your target consumers aren’t where they claim to be?

 

Social ad platform 140 Proof, which uses people’s public social network activities such as their location, what they share and who they follow to target them with ads, did some research on the difference between people’s stated locations and their actual ones. Guess what? People aren’t always where they say they are. Here's their blog post on the topic.

 

In a concept it’s dubbed “geographic drift,” in major cities like New York and L.A., there are many people who self-identify as being from those cities who actually live in a broad area around them. (In 140 Proof's map shown here, the yellow border indicates the actual city while the area in blue shows where self-proclaimed New Yorkers or Angelenos actually are.)

 

140 Proof has some theories about why this is. Some have to do with convenience (New York is more recognizable than Bridgeport; commuting makes drift possible). But there’s also an aspirational, or vanity, factor.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Error in self reported metrics is not a new thing, but clearly measurement validity is an issue for #location-based marketers relying on this type of data.

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U.S. news readers less engaged when referred by Facebook - study | Reuters

U.S. news readers less engaged when referred by Facebook - study | Reuters | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

(Reuters) - Readers of some of the top U.S. news sites are more engaged when they go directly to the website rather than throughFacebook, according to a study from the Pew Research Center released on Monday.


The research found that users who come directly to a news site spend about three times as long per visit, or almost five minutes on average. Those who find the news by searching or throughFacebook spend about two minutes.

 

Direct visitors also view about five times as many pages per month as those coming through Facebook referrals or through search engines such as Google Inc.

 

The study is revealing because increasingly news organizations are relying on social media platforms to distribute content especially to reach younger readers.

 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Readership quality (time on site and number of page views = #engagement) varies by source attribution, is this surprising? Somewhat akin to the readership differences of subscribers versus browsers at a news stand.

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Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, March 13, 4:36 PM

This is not surprising to anyone who watches their own stats. Social media sites like Facebook consist of members who are more inclined to look at photos and "click" like without even reading text, let alone clicking a link and really reading the article.

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8 ways digital is empowering women

8 ways digital is empowering women | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

The internet is playing a pivotal role in placing campaigns around women's rights at the centre of public debate. Amanda McKenna provides some key examples.

 

The way we communicate women's issues has changed. Movements can spread to millions in seconds and campaigns can hit the ground running – with smart social media planning, vast email databases and viral videos all playing their part.

 

Now that anyone with an internet connection has a platform, women's rights are taking centre stage. Examples are everywhere you look. Lucy-Anne Holmes' No More Page Three crusade garnered online support at breakneck speed, and this online petition helped nudge the Bank of England towards featuring Jane Austen on the new £10 note.

 

Digital power is driving a new, stronger wave of awareness about feminism. International Women's Day recently celebrated women and girls' achievements on a global scale. And now Sheryl Sandberg has launched her #banbossy campaign to foster leadership skills in girls. Here are eight more ways that digital is empowering women right now…

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Eight examples of how #socialmedia and other #digital platforms are being used to champion women's issues. 

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18-24-Year-Olds on Facebook Report an Average of 649 Friends, Up From 510 Last Year

18-24-Year-Olds on Facebook Report an Average of 649 Friends, Up From 510 Last Year | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Roughly two-thirds of Americans aged 12 and older have a social networking profile, up from 62% last year, according to [pdf] a report from Edison Research and Triton Digital. Facebook remains the most popular site, used by 58% of survey respondents of that age, but was the only platform other than MySpace not to see an increase in penetration year-over-year. But, Facebook users report a larger number of Facebook friends this year, and that increase is being driven by its younger users.

 

Overall, Facebook users claimed this year to have an average of 350 friends each, up from303 in last year’s study and 262 the year before. Among respondents with a Facebook profile, 18-24-year-olds boasted the largest network of friends, at an average of 649. That’s a significant hike from their leading reported average of 510 last year. (And for it’s worth, it’s a much higher figure than found in a separate study from the Pew Research Center.)

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Geert Stox's curator insight, March 12, 7:43 AM

If people say Facebook is on its way down, they shouldn't forget FB is on a huge mountain, so it could take a while before it is back down the mountain...

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Women Dominate Social Media [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter

Women Dominate Social Media [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Did you know that women use social media more often and in more ways than their male counterparts?

 

What if I told you that more women use Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, Instagram and Twitter than men – men dominate on LinkedIn, and that’s it – and that they’re more likely to use social media sites several times each day?

 

Moreover, women are more likely to engage with brands on social media than men, consume more news from social sources and are leading the trend towards mobile. This visual from Finances Online takes a closer look at why women dominate social media worldwide.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Convincing statistics about the dominance of women on social media. Are you surprised?

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Anamaria Mocanu's curator insight, March 5, 11:30 PM

Let's invent something for men too. :)

Carlos Polaino Jiménez's curator insight, March 6, 1:09 PM

Seguro que de esto hablamos y mucho en @iAcademi

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How to leverage in-store technology to locate customers on the path to purchase

How to leverage in-store technology to locate customers on the path to purchase | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Customers want and expect a personalized experience with a brand. In fact, 81 percent of customers will pay more for a great customer experience, according to a report from Oracle. The first step toward creating that positive personalized shopping experience is knowing where the customer is in his path to a purchase in order to deliver targeted messages via the proper communication channel. 


That’s why retailers must listen to customers to know what types of messages are relevant. While a path to purchase may seem logical and easily tracked in the online shopping experience, many marketers are entirely in the dark when it comes to understanding where individual customers are in their in-store or offline shopping experience. How can retailers make sure they’re reaching customers at all times before and after a purchase in brick-and-mortar stores? The answer lies in new digital in-store technology that allows retailers to listen to what customers want and where they are on the path to purchase.

 

Each step that a customer may take before purchasing — identifying a need, researching, selecting a product and buying — aligns with a marketing opportunity. For example, when a customer researches a product, he interacts with the company’s website and may search for recommendations on social media or solicit advice from online reviews. Marketers know that those are the best channels to reach customers and the best content to move customers forward along their path to purchase.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This article outlines how 5 #instore #technologies can be used to map the customer's path to purchase.

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MediaPost Publications Why People Don't Use Smartphones to Shop 02/27/2014

MediaPost Publications Why People Don't Use Smartphones to Shop 02/27/2014 | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

There are plenty of reasons consumers use smartphones to shop, ranging from access to product information to finding competitive pricing.

And many shoppers find their own preferred path to purchase and their own reasons why.

For example, as I wrote about earlier this week, consumers use both apps and mobile websites to shop and more find mobile browsers to be more convenient (More Mobile Shoppers Like Convenience of Websites Over Apps).

Almost half (46%) of mobile shoppers say their shopping experience would be better if they could check available stock while in a store and almost a third (31%) want in-store Wi-Fi with a simple login.

But some consumers don’t use any online tools to buy, primarily because they like to shop in a store where they can see and touch their desired products.

Based on a large global study by PwC, of those who did not purchase online, here are the top reasons:

54% -- Prefer to touch/try the product52% -- Just prefer to shop in store43% -- Worried about security of personal data35% -- Don’t trust online payment methods25% -- Don’t have a credit/debit card

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Findings from recent PwC research details some barriers to using smartphones for shopping.

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The One Thing You Need To Know To Succeed With Millennial Customers

The One Thing You Need To Know To Succeed With Millennial Customers | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it
How can you create a customer experience that attracts millennial consumers? Whether you're serving millennials in retail, b2b, hospitality, finance, banking, healthcare, insurance, or another field of commerce, here's customer experience consultant Micah Solomon's advice for success
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Interesting article that introduces the concept of "digital parity" as the key to marketing success to the millennial generation of consumers.

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Inside the world of the ‘Instafamous’

Inside the world of the ‘Instafamous’ | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Shawn Megira is nothing special. He doesn’t sing in a boy band or star in a reality show. But when the 15-year-old Long Islander posts a selfie to Instagram, teenage girls freak out like they just met One Direction.

 

Megira is, to use an emerging portmanteau, “Instafamous” — a self-made micro-celebrity, known for his work on the Internet only. And like celebrities who have achieved fame through more conventional means — celebrity parents, sex tapes — his fame comes with benefits: like a sponsorship deal with L.A.-based clothing line Ambition Apparel and dozens of beaming “fans” begging for his picture. More recently, Megira was the subject of the brilliant short documentary “Instafame,” produced by the creative agency Sylvain Labs.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Another example of the power of "self-branding" on social media. This report is similar to the one that was recently aired on PBS's Frontline program entitled the "Generation Like" (see: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/generation-like/ ;).

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How to Get Real Neuromarketing Insights | Testing & Usability

How to Get Real Neuromarketing Insights | Testing & Usability | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Before dismissing your great idea for the next campaign, ad, or website landing page, make sure you don't rely solely on qualitative data. By incorporating current neuroscience studies and other qualitative data to form hypotheses, you can begin testing these hypotheses thoroughly and interpreting the results to maximize your conversion optimization and create your next breakthrough campaign.

 

A few years ago, Frito-Lay spot-tested an ad featuring two women in a laundromat. One woman callously steals the only available washing machine. Frustrated, the other exacts her revenge: she dumps Cheetos into the thief's dryer full of white clothes.

 

Focus groups hated the ad and criticized it as mean-spirited. Judging from their emotional reactions, marketers thought the spot might yield negative brand associations if aired. But in a different kind of test group — one in which participants had electroencephalogram (EEG) sensors strapped to their heads — it evoked an extremely positive response. According to the group's brain activity, women found the ad particularly hilarious, even if they weren't saying so.

 

Frito-Lay decided to place its faith in brain scans and air the ad. The "Orange Underground" campaign went on to help NeuroFocus, the company that conducted the EEG research, earn a Grand Ogilvy award. (Since then, NeuroFocus has become a Nielsen subsidiary.)

 

Frito-Lay isn't the only multinational to invest in neuromarketing research. Intel, PepsiCo, and Google have all paid millions for a peek into their customers' brains. And as the technology becomes more portable and powerful, more than 100 neuromarketing companies have sprung up worldwide.

 

Offering unprecedented access to a futuristic kind of consumer data, the neuromarketing revolution is in full swing. Amidst all the sci-fi excitement, however, much of the marketing world is forgetting to ask a key question: How can we effectively use this data?

 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

As the author of this article points out, there are two steps to get past the hype surrounding #neuromarketing. First, it is important to understand the limitations surrounding it, and then second, maximize its value by doing some basic hypothesis testing. 

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Different Customers, Different Prices, Thanks To Big Data

Different Customers, Different Prices, Thanks To Big Data | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Big data is helping companies price goods according to a
customer's willingness to pay. Firms, seeing green but fearing
a public backlash, are treading carefully.

 

Many firms consider targeted coupons to be the most effective way to implement differential pricing, rather than risk stirring up resentment by using surcharges. “As long as things are presented in the form of a discount for your special behavior, people accept it,” said Tim Smith, founder of pricing consulting firm Wiglaf Pricing in Chicago.

 

Kostick of 100% Pure acknowledges it is a tricky dance: “We don’t want to cross the line where we upset our customers, but we still want to capture the customers that are not going to buy.”

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Price discrimination capabilities on e-commerce websites are gaining traction with the development of big data based predictive analytics algorithms. This article presents a case study and overview of the practice.

 

How are consumers likely to respond?

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Retail Transaction Data Suggests Frequent Shoppers Arent Necessarily Loyal Ones

Retail Transaction Data Suggests Frequent Shoppers Arent Necessarily Loyal Ones | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

A frequent customer is not always a loyal one, says Cardlytics in a new study [pdf] based on a “whole-wallet” analysis of transaction records held by consumers’ banks for nearly 70% of US households. The research indicates that customers who frequently visit specific retailers tend to be heavy category spenders, meaning that they also frequently visit other retailers in the same category. Instead, true loyalty is often the domain of “light customers,” who make fewer trips to stores but typically shop at the same ones.

 

The analysis looked at 5 retailer categories: restaurants; apparel; gas and convenience; grocery; and general retail. Rather than simply analyze how often customers of these categories visit specific stores (which might be how the stores themselves determine loyalty), the whole-wallet approach based on transaction records looks at how often customers visit stores as a percentage of their total category visits.


In each case, “light” customers were more loyal than “heavy” customers.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

The results of a recent study that once again (because it has been studied before) dashes naïve beliefs about customer loyalty. However, while interesting, the results are only based on behaviors and neglect the attitudinal aspect of loyalty.

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Consumers demand better customer care in digital era and a quarter take more than a year to forgive mistakes, report says

Consumers demand better customer care in digital era and a quarter take more than a year to forgive mistakes, report says | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

UK Consumers have become more demanding and more easily disappointed despite their access to brands and companies vastly improving with the development of digital technology, a study has shown.

The report from customer experience management firm Thunderhead surveyed more than 2,000 consumers and interviewed senior customer executives from 33 businesses. The findings concluded that nearly a quarter of people (24 per cent) said they would take more than a year to forgive a company if it had somehow broken their trust, while 23 per cent said they would never trust the company again.

In addition, more than half (52 per cent) said there had been no improvement in their relationships with businesses over the last three years, and a quarter said they had worsened. Of the people surveyed, nearly a this (30 per cent) said they would share a bad experience online, on the phone or in person, and the report concluded that on average a negative experience would be shared with around 18 people.

“Marketing has become a highly sophisticated and business-critical operation that looks beyond customer acquisition and with this has grown in its importance to organisations,” the report stated. “However, with greater profile comes increased scrutiny also. Unfortunately, as our research suggests, the reality is that too often investment in the customer relationship is undermined by a lack of focus on customer engagement.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This article provides some important caveats to businesses that think they are providing good customer services. Time for a reevaluation of customer care practices. Better customer knowledge, speed, and quality interactions needed to build #trust for existing customers. 

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Survey: Consumers Ready For Indoor Location, Marketing

Survey: Consumers Ready For Indoor Location, Marketing | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

A new consumer survey by “iBeacon marketing platform” provider Swirl, which works with specialty retailers such as Alexi and Ani and Timberland, shows that consumers are ready for indoor location and marketing. Industry and retailer fears about consumer acceptance of indoor location tracking may thus be overblown.

 

It is true that consumers are concerned about who has access to their location data in the abstract. However when they receive clear value for sharing it they’re more than comfortable with doing so. 

According to the Swirl survey of 1,000 US adults, 85 percent of consumers have used some sort of mobile shopping app while in stores. Among those apps are a mix of different functions and content:

 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This article provides some recent research findings that seem to support the readiness of consumers to participate in #location-based marketing activities (#hyperlocal). The key is for retailers and others using the technology to build trust by communicating the benefits of participation to the consumer. That's not too difficult is it?

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Busting the Myth that Negative WOM is More Powerful than Positive Talk -- Ed Keller - Ed Keller - JackMyersThinkTank - Jack Myers

Busting the Myth that Negative WOM is More Powerful than Positive Talk -- Ed Keller - Ed Keller - JackMyersThinkTank - Jack Myers | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Everyone, it seems, has heard that people are far more likely to share their bad brand experiences than positive ones. Probe further about whether they have actually seen evidence of that, and the answer is generally, “No, but I’ve heard it’s true.”

 

Well, the fact is, it’s not true. Positive WOM is far more prevalent than negative WOM, and has a greater impact. For brands, there is far more to be gained than feared by being part of organic consumer conversation.

To start, more than two-thirds of all brand-related WOM is generally positive in nature, while less than 10% is generally negative. That’s over eight times more positive than negative WOM. And what’s more, positive WOM is even more prevalent in key product categories, topping out at nearly 75% for personal care and beauty. Even a more polarizing category, like telecom, earns over 50% positive WOM, versus 14% negative.

 

 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

An excellent article that debunks one of the most widely heard "truisms" in consumer behavior about word of mouth (#WOM). More evidence that "sacred cows make the best burgers", especially when backed with sound measurement and research.

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Infographic: The Beacon Marketing Opportunity - Marketing Technology Blog

Infographic: The Beacon Marketing Opportunity - Marketing Technology Blog | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Infographic: The Beacon Marketing Opportunity by Douglas Karr on Marketing Technology Blog

 

We’ve shared information on Swirl’s mobile beacon marketing system before. This infographic from Swirl illustrates the power of beacon-triggered content and offers in terms of consumer appeal and the potential to influence in-store purchase decisions.

Key data points included in the infographic include72% of consumers said that a relevant mobile offer delivered to their smartphone while shopping in a store would significantly influence their likelihood to make a purchase.79% of consumers who have received push notifications on their smartphone in the past six months have made at least one purchase as a result.80% of consumers would use a mobile app more often while shopping in a store if that app delivered relevant sales and promotional notifications. Sixty two percent would use apps in-store more often if they provided content that was relevant to the shopper’s interests and location within the store.

 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Some very insightful stats about how receptive #consumers may be to #digital in-store marketing efforts using apps and #push notifications.

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Millennials More Willing Than Boomers to Share Data With Marketers

Millennials More Willing Than Boomers to Share Data With Marketers | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

6 in 10 US Millennials claim that they would be willing to share personal information with marketers, while Baby Boomers would be much less likely to do so, according to results from a Mintel study. That gap even extends to those unwilling to share information: at least 30% of Millennials who would not provide private information said they would be swayed by an incentive offer, while only 13% of reluctant Baby Boomers agreed. A separate study [pdf] from Communispace comes to similar conclusions.

 

Indeed, when Communispace asked respondents whether they would share their data for perks, Millennials (in this case, aged 13-31) were most likely to agree, with that likelihood decreasing with each generation. Similarly, younger generations were the most likely to say they would voluntarily share personal data with a company in exchange for a 5% price discount.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

These studies show a clear distinction in cross-generational social norms and behavior patterns. What can account for these changes?

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Universal Mind Blog » Journeys: The Customer Experience Mapping Tool

Universal Mind Blog » Journeys: The Customer Experience Mapping Tool | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

I’m excited to introduce you to Journeys: The Customer Experience Mapping Tool. This iPad application is the first journey mapping tool which allows you to capture your customer’s journeys as they happen. It is designed specifically for in-the-field data capture including the ability to capture photos, videos, audio, and locations and associate them with an experience.

 

Because of Universal Mind’s focus on Customer Experience (CX), Journeys was born out of the work we were already doing with our clients. As our Strategy Practice worked to capture and organize user information in the field, we realized there was a need for a mobile tool which captured and organized this data in a way where it could be analyzed. In working with Universal Mind’s Research & Development practice, we began to create a tool for internal use.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

You knew it was going to happen sooner or later, Universal Mind has introduced the first iPad based #customerexperience mapping tool.

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Shopper in 2014 - Points of influence | warc.com

Shopper in 2014 - Points of influence | warc.com | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it
At a glance: Shopper strategies evolve

Key arguments in this article:

Shopper marketing is high on the agenda for 2014, for two reasons. First is the ongoing transformation of retail by tech; second is the growing understanding of the role emotion plays in the shopping process.

The result is a smarter understanding of consumers' purchase journeys, and the points along them at which brands can exert influence. Brands such as Frito-Lay and Mastercard are investing in research to build this knowledge.

Data from Nielsen shows how complex influence-mapping can be: two products in the same category can have very different purchase paths.

The trend toward more nuanced shopper insight is likely to accelerate as the impact of traditional in-store promotions declines. A study by IRI found that trade promotion investment has grown without driving sales volumes.

Tech expands the purchase path… 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This article does a very good job of illustrating the complexity of shopping behaviors today. The technologies available to support shopping behaviors make them complex, emotion laden and difficult to map.

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Carlos Polaino Jiménez's curator insight, March 6, 1:08 PM

La configuración de los mercados con la componente digital

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Infographic: What Your Customers Really Think About Privacy - Marketing Technology Blog

Infographic: What Your Customers Really Think About Privacy - Marketing Technology Blog | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Infographic: What Your Customers Really Think About Privacy by Douglas Karr on Marketing Technology Blog

 

The media loves to drone on and on about how companies are using and abusing big data. Do consumers really care? As a marketer, my only expectation is that the data be utilized to improve the experience I receive from the brand. Sometimes that’s a bit too optimistic, but when I answer a ton of questions and then the experience isn’t personalized, I often move on. How about your customers? Do they care about how you’re utilizing the data captured at each engagement and conversion point along the way?

 

This infographic from SDL shares how marketers aren’t effectively communicating the benefits of sharing some data, while at the same time not necessarily utilizing the data they have – and there are some basics that consumers just aren’t ready to share with brands they don’t trust. Here are some key findings:

 

What do customers really think about loyalty programs? They beat out free products. 49 percent of respondents said they would give up personal information for a loyalty program, but only 41 percent would do the same for free products and services.What do customers really think about in-store tracking? They reject it. 76 percent of respondents with smartphones aren’t comfortable with retailers tracking their in-store movements.What do customers really think about mobile privacy features? They don’t use them. 72 percent of global respondents rarely or never use “Do Not Track” or “Incognito” features that would allow them to opt out of website tracking.

 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A summary of recent research by SDL about attitudes toward privacy in digital marketing environments (websites, social media) across three countries.

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Personal Data Usage Is A Matter of Trust | GreenBook

Personal Data Usage Is A Matter of Trust | GreenBook | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

A new report from the Global Research Business Network on attitudes to personal and sensitive data has revealed that 40% of UK citizens and 45% of people living in the US saying they are very concerned about how their data is used.

 

Not only is beauty in the eye of the beholder, so too it seems is the perception of what is seen as sensitive personal data by consumers and what is not.  A recent study by GRBN (Global Research Business Network – www.grbn.org) was presented at IIeX in Amsterdam and has profound implications for the market research industry.   The study consisted of over 2000 interviews conducted in early February across the United States and the United Kingdom.  The purpose of the study was to identify issues, from the consumers’ perspective, that relate to an increasingly dicey world of data privacy.   You can download the report here.


Recent revelations such as the capabilities of the NSA or data security breaches of enormous magnitude (think Target) can make even the most complacent consumer jittery about personal information floating around cyberspace.   So what did the GRBN survey find?

 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This recent research report by GRBN highlights some cross-cultural differences in attitudes towards #privacy and the usage of personal and sensitive data. Interesting implications are raised for global companies that rely on accessing "personal data".

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