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Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments
The Identification, measurement and analysis of consumer types, perceptions, attitudes, and activities in digital environments.
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What Motivates Customers to Make Recommendations on Social Media? [Infographic]

What Motivates Customers to Make Recommendations on Social Media? [Infographic] | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Want to get more customers to recommend you on their social networks? Then you'll need to know what drives them to make those recommendations and which networks they prefer.

 

The most trusted social media platform for product/service recommendation is Facebook, according to the following Social Media Link infographic, based on a recent study.

 

Some 54% of survey respondents use Facebook to share their product purchases.

 

So, what inspires consumers to write a product review? A whopping 93% cite "a positive experience with the brand," and 79% say "receiving a free product or sample."

 

Poor customer experiences inspire sharing as well: 71% say "a negative experience with a brand" motivates them to write a review, according to Social Media Link.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Do you want your customers to make #recommendations about your #brand to friends and others on social networks? Here is a good list of key motivators.

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Marco Favero's curator insight, Today, 6:32 AM

aggiungi la tua intuizione ...

Sylvie Bédard's curator insight, Today, 10:13 AM

Qu'est-ce qui motive les clients à faire des recommandations sur les médias sociaux? Très intéressant!

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12 Secrets of the Human Brain to Use in Your Marketing [Infographic]

12 Secrets of the Human Brain to Use in Your Marketing [Infographic] | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Knowing how the human mind processes information and images—and putting that knowledge to use—can help you become a more engaging and effective marketer.

 

Here's a look at some fascinating facts about the human mind, from a marketing perspective.

Did you know that the human brain processes emotions far more quickly than rational thought? "Emotions process input five times faster than our conscious brain," according to the following Emma infographic.

 

Our brains also really love images. "Our brains process images 60,000 times faster than text," states Emma. "We comprehend and remember pictures with text more than text alone."

To get more facts about the human brain to help you improve your marketing, check out the following infographic:

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Do you use any of these #neuroscience factoids in your #marketing planning? Perhaps you should.

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INFOGRAPHIC: Which Social Networks Are Used by Job Seekers?

INFOGRAPHIC: Which Social Networks Are Used by Job Seekers? | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Social recruiting platform Jobvite released the results of its 2015 Job Seeker Nation Study, which is now in its sixth year.

Social media-related highlights from the study included:

67 percent of job seekers using social media turn to Facebook, while 45 percent use Twitter and 40 percent use LinkedIn.The “big three” are starting to get some company, however, as 31 percent of job seekers said they used Instagram as part of the process, 25 percent cited Pinterest and 17 percent said they use Snapchat.31 percent of job seekers admitted to inflating their skills while using Twitter.27 percent of job seekers said they fabricated job references on Facebook, with twice as many men admitting to doing so as women.47 percent of job seekers used mobile as part of their job search.

Other findings from Jobvite’s 2015 Job Seeker Nation Study included:

45 percent of job seekers are satisfied in their current positions but open to new opportunities.50 percent of employed workers see their positions as entry-level or stepping stones, with that figure rising to 71 percent for those aged 18 through 29.79 percent of recruiters have made hires via LinkedIn, despite job seekers’ prolific Facebook use.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Do you know which #socialnetworks are most used by job seekers? The results might surprise you.

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Apparently Shopaholics Have Discovered Apps - eMarketer

Apparently Shopaholics Have Discovered Apps - eMarketer | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it
Mobile app usage grew 76% last year, and retail was the star of the show, as the number of sessions with lifestyle and shopping apps rose 174%. However, mobile shopping app users are still more likely to put down the phone when they decide to make a final purchase.
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Mobile app usage is gaining traction in a number of categories. It would be interesting to know how usage compares to websites on laptops and desktop PCs.

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Survey Programs vs. Survey Projects [[Comparison Infographic]] | Cvent Survey

Survey Programs vs. Survey Projects [[Comparison Infographic]]   | Cvent Survey | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

As you think about everything your company has planned for the year, there are probably numerous initiatives that you’ll want to collect feedback on to help gauge their success: campaigns, events, product enhancements, employee benefits program, etc. And when you think through your feedback strategy, you might plan to release a survey here and a survey there. But stop! Before you think any further about one-off surveys, you need to understand the difference between survey programs and survey projects. If you want to see the full value and benefits of collecting feedback, you’ll opt for a survey program instead. Check out our comparison infographic to see why:

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Here is a handy reference for distinguishing between survey programs and survey projects with the pros and cons for each.

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The Path to Purchase: The Evolution of How We Buy [Infographic]

The Path to Purchase: The Evolution of How We Buy [Infographic] | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Learn how people have changed their purchasing habits during the past hundred years.

 

It's the great American pastime.

 

No, I'm not talking about baseball. Or stuffing your face with apple pie. Or arguing about politics with your family over Thanksgiving dinner. No, I'm talking about the great American pastime of buying stuff.

Unlike those other pastimes, however, which have remained relatively unchanged over the years, the way we buy has evolved considerably. For example ...

 

In 1914, you might've been tempted to buy a (non-branded) pastry after noticing a delicious smell emanating from the local bakery.

In 2014, you might be tempted to buy a Pop-Tart after seeing a commercial for Pop-Tarts on TV, or after reading an article about Pop-Tarts on The Wall Street Journal website, or after hearing about (or attending) a Pop-Tarts-branded summer concert series.

 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A useful summary of the evolutionary changes consumers have made in their #shopping #behaviors over the last 100 years.

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Americans Rely On Online Reviews Despite Not Trusting Them

Americans Rely On Online Reviews Despite Not Trusting Them | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it
Americans rely on online reviews to make purchase decisions but at the same time they do not trust that reviews are true and fair.

The majority of Americans rely on online reviews. 78% check out the review section before making a purchase and nearly half of Americans (44%) are active contributors, actively writing reviews if only occasionally. Americans rely heavily on online review ratings and comments despite believing that many ratings are untrustworthy.

Back in January 2014 we asked reviewers if they ever wrote reviews for products or services they had never actually purchased or tried. 21% said that they had – and the numbers of fraudulent reviewers has remained constant.

 

In this latest Omnibus survey we look in more depth at how people use reviews and why they are so important to the purchase decision process when so many know first hand that they are not always reliable.

 

Those who admit to often writing reviews for products they have no experience of are men (11%) or millennials (13%). Although the over 55s do admit to ever writing fraudulent reviews, only 3% claim to do it often. If you want to trust a reviewer then try to find one from the Midwest – they admit to significantly fewer fraudulent reviews than those from the Northeast and South.

 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Recent survey research findings from YouGov provides insight into how consumers perceive the usefulness and veracity of online #reviews about and often provided by e-commerce business or third party vendors.  The article also contains some good summary stats about the frequency of use and the beliefs about why people write reviews. It is useful to keep in mind that any data provided by people such as online reviews, responses on surveys, or eyewitness reports, all contain measurement error that compromises the reliability of the information contained therein. Still the article is worth a reading.

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How Individual Identity Influences The Way Audiences Share [Survey Data]

How Individual Identity Influences The Way Audiences Share [Survey Data] | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

What motivates us to share content? Contributor Kelsey Libert delves into a recent study by Fractl detailing how and why we share on social media.

 

From content influencers to “lurkers,” the content that people choose to share online has come to play a major role in how they curate their self-image and control how they present themselves to others online.

But what makes a person identify with a piece of content? Which aspects of their personal identity are more effective at enticing users to share it?

 

Understanding this complex relationship is the key to understanding users’ engagement with content – or lack thereof. Nobody knows this better than BuzzFeed, the internet’s most successful publisher.

 

BuzzFeed founder Jonah Peretti built the site around the idea that one of the ways people form their self-identity is by appropriating and incorporating cultural artifacts from media (such as songs, movies, TV shows, etc.). In the internet age, those types of cultural artifacts take the form of memes, tweets, and social media posts.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A detailed description of the findings from a recent survey conducted by Fractl. In it they explored how 5 types of individual identity relate to online social sharing behaviors and the motives for doing so. Interesting stuff, well worth a reading.

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How Moms Use Smartphones to Shop

How Moms Use Smartphones to Shop | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Moms are using their smartphones throughout the shopping process both online and in stores, according to a recent report from BabyCenter.

 

The survey of 1,000 moms in the US who own smartphones found the majority of moms use their devices to get product ideas (55% say they do so), compare product features (56%), get product recommendations (58%), compare prices (68%), and find coupons/deals (59%).

 

Nearly half (49%) of the moms surveyed say they also use their smartphones to decide where to buy.

 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This article reviews a recent study detailing the use of smartphones during the #digital shopping #behaviors of mothers. Five key questions are explored about the path to purchase, product categories shopped, the frequency of smartphone use, types of stores shopped and the apps used, together with descriptive #stats. Very good reference value.

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Tara Sfida's curator insight, December 9, 2014 11:47 PM

This article describes how moms are using smartphones to shop more often than through traditional media. Most of these moms use their device to purchase products, and this is important information for many businesses in order to reach this type of consumer.

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How Social Media Could Damage Your Employer Brand [INFOGRAPHIC]

How Social Media Could Damage Your Employer Brand [INFOGRAPHIC] | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

We all know that recruiters use social media as a way of sussing out potential employees, but what about existing ones?

Can negative posts from employees harm a brand? To learn more, check out the infographic below from Rise Smart.


TAKEAWAYS: 

50% of people post about their employers online – it’s an easy place to air discrepancies or praise a brand.There are over 400 millions tweets sent out a day – I wonder how many are complaints about bosses…Recruiters! Recognising an employees hard work can equate to a positive tweet about the brand or business
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A summary of some statistics about how social media conversations are related to employer brands. Basically the infographic is attempting to make a case for three actions that may result in positive reviews.

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Majority of Digital Travel Researchers Will Be Mobile by Next Year - eMarketer

Majority of Digital Travel Researchers Will Be Mobile by Next Year - eMarketer | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Another [product category where most of the 2015 will be the tipping point: Half of digital travel researchers will check out flights, hotels and more not only on a desktop or laptop PC but also (or only) via mobile, eMarketer predicts. And smartphones are more commonly used for both researching and booking travel than tablets.

 

Based on eMarketer's latest forecast of digital and mobile travel researching and booking, 128.8 million people in the US will research travel on the internet this year, or 63.0% of internet users. Of that group, 47.4% will do so via mobile. Meanwhile, 106.3 million people (52.0% of internet users) will actually book travel online, including 31.6% of the total who will book travel on their mobile devices. 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

As reported by eMarketer it appears travel is another product category where most of the #digital engagement by consumers is shifting to #mobile devices.

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Mobile Search Market Too Big for Test-and-Learn - eMarketer

Mobile Search Market Too Big for Test-and-Learn - eMarketer | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

The growing population of mobile searchers, coupled with changes made to algorithms and advertising platforms, have forced marketers to include mobile-specific tactics in their search engine optimization (SEO) and search engine marketing (SEM) strategies. But marketers need to brace themselves for another wave of change: Consumers are increasingly conducting vertical searches in category-specific apps, not mobile search engines. 

 

The rise of in-app search promises another challenge for marketers to turn into an opportunity. eMarketer analyzed data from several surveys on app vs. browser use for search, and while apps paled in comparison to the search engine shares, any research that suggests 10% to 33% of mobile users are searching in apps first, or in apps only, should be a wake-up call for many marketers. - See more at: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/Mobile-Search-Market-Too-Big-Test-and-Learn/1011529/1#sthash.dvHlVocw.dpuf

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Just when marketers were thinking they had #mobile #SEO figured out, #digital #consumerbehavior is throwing them a curve. Now it appears that consumers are engaging in vertical search behaviors within apps along with more broadly based horizontal search using browsers. While the gap is still large between the two types it may close rapidly as apps improve their search capabilities. 

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The (completely subjective) digital psychology top ten countdown

The (completely subjective) digital psychology top ten countdown | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Digital Psychology is a relatively new discipline that combines theory from the worlds of behavioural economics, psychology and digital marketing to create digital communications that are compelling and persuasive to our unconscious minds. 


The great thing about combining social science theory with contemporary digital best practise is that marketers are able to hypothesise and test assumptions on a statistically significant number of subjects (customers) in a relatively short period of time.  

 

Also, through the medium of A/B and multivariate testing, put the lessons learnt into practise almost immediately.

 

This means that there should be some excellent proven examples of digital psychology out there on the web, and I’ve taken the opportunity to rank what I think are the top performers.

 

From small companies, to international giants, all those listed are employing some pretty clever tricks from the digital psychology toolkit.

 

Is your company one of them? 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Here are 10 examples of how the emerging science of #digitalpsychology has been applied to #digitalmarketing communications.

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Millennials Want Brands To Support Their Social Causes

Millennials Want Brands To Support Their Social Causes | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Pinpoint Market Research reports that “twenty-somethings” want something more from brands than just a product or service; they want social, political and community action.

 

The market research company surveyed 1,650 men and women aged twenty to twenty-nine in the U.S. about social issues and brand engagement. The study shows that U.S. consumers age 20-29 want brands involved in the social, political & economic issues they care about.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Do you know what attracts the Millennial generation to a brand? Here is some recent research that provides some insight about that question.

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Lytics State of Digital Marketing Survey Reveals 80% of Consumers Are Receiving Irrelevant Offers Online, Majority of Marketers Believe They Deliver Personalized Customer Experiences - Press Releas...

Lytics State of Digital Marketing Survey Reveals 80% of Consumers Are Receiving Irrelevant Offers Online, Majority of Marketers Believe They Deliver Personalized Customer Experiences - Press Releas... | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

PORTLAND, OR--(Marketwired - Feb 10, 2015) - Lytics (http://www.getlytics.com), a predictive data service, today released its first State of Digital Marketing Survey Report and infographic. Revealed in the many salient findings was that most marketers (53 percent) believe they are delivering effective personalized experiences to their online customers, yet the vast majority of consumers (80 percent) reported that brands are not familiar (or at best only somewhat familiar) with their online purchasing needs.

Disconnects between marketers and consumers can cause brands to lose customers to competitors, miss opportunities and waste countless hours and resources developing and providing offers that are ignored completely," said Kathleen Schaub, vice president, IDC CMO Advisory Service. "In 2015, marketers that want to close the gap between what they are delivering and what customers respond to must find ways to identify how, when and where online purchases are made and then deliver more personalized experiences that address buyers' desires."

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This recent report suggests a large gap between consumers and marketers about the relevance and #personalization of online offers via #digitalmarketing activities. Get the report via a link in the article.

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An #Infographic Overview of Online Reviews | SEJ

An #Infographic Overview of Online Reviews | SEJ | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

As many e-commerce, local, and even enterprise companies know, online reviews can make or break a business. The infographic below describes some of the trends in online reviews, including:

In the US, Amazon is the leading review site. 42% of all its customers have left at least one review.Other top US review sites include Google+, Yahoo, Yelp, and TripAdvisorYelp is the review site with the most global traffic84% of all consumers read online reviews, reading an average of 4-6 reviews before they begin to trust a business76% of customers are willing to pay more for hotels with better reviews.

How have online reviews affected your business?

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

How much do your know about online #consumerreviews? Here are some facts to consider.

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How Much Search Traffic Actually Comes from Googling? - eMarketer

How Much Search Traffic Actually Comes from Googling? - eMarketer | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it
No one comes even close to rivaling Google for organic search traffic. According to recent research, the search giant accounts for more than 90% of online and mobile web organic search traffic worldwide. Mobile continues to fuel overall organic search growth, and other industry sources put Google's share of US mobile organic search referrals above 85%.
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Google continues to dominate the online search market place. Check out these impressive statistics.

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How Gender, Age, and Left-Handedness Affect E-Commerce Behavior [Infographic]

How Gender, Age, and Left-Handedness Affect E-Commerce Behavior [Infographic] | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Women click around more on e-commerce sites, left-handed shoppers are slower to navigate, and older consumers tend to view fewer pages, according to a recent report from Content Square.

The report was based on data from a study of 4,000 French consumers. The researchers analyzed participants' browsing history on 20 e-commerce sites, looking for demographic differences in key behaviors, including the number of clicks, display time, active time, inactive time, interaction rate, scroll rate, viewed pages, and average hesitation before click.

Below, key findings from the study.

Women vs. Men

Women are more active than men on e-commerce websites, the analysis found:

Women click 30% more on websites than men.Women view 12% more pages.Women hesitate 10% less before clicking on a page element.Women purchase 7% faster than men.


Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Some unusual research study findings about website users in France. Worth a reading and consideration about how the results might relate to users elsewhere.

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Why Modeling Churn is Difficult

Why Modeling Churn is Difficult | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Customer churn is a really interesting problem. It appears to be a simple calculation, but the more you explore it the more complex it becomes. Evidence of this complexity appears in the variety of articles written on the subject, such as:

For Entrepreneurs uses a very straightforward method of calculation, which is then used as the basis for a number of other important SaaS metrics.Chaotic Flow‘s SaaS metrics archive presents some very interesting questions.HubSpot expands the subject of churn rate into an entire e-book.Shopify has a great article on the complexities of calculating churn.

One of the best ways to understand a problem is to create a mathematical model of how it works.

The question we need to answer is: “What exactly is Churn?”

 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A great primer for analysts about the complexities in modeling customer churn. 

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Infographic: The role of bloggers in the path to purchase

Infographic: The role of bloggers in the path to purchase | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it
Bloggers have become an important part of the savvy marketer’s online toolkit, with research suggesting they play an important role in the path to purchase.Over two-thirds (84 per cent) of people make purchases after reading about products on a blog, with two in three people reading blogs a few times a week – but over a third (36 per cent) are discouraged by paid content in blogs, according to research.

The study into the influence of blogs on purchase decisions found that over half of the 1,000 respondents surveyed had read blogs that contain advertising, and one in four people buy something on a monthly basis after reading about it on a blog.

 

Readers are more discouraged by paid content within blog posts than by advertising in blogs, the research found, with only 27 per cent stating they would be put off by advertising, and 36 per cent saying they have been turned off from a blog that contains paid content.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Recent research about the role of #bloggers in a customer's "pathtopurchase. However, the sample used was respondents from the UK who "read blogs at least once a month". Unfortunately, the article does not reveal the incidence rate of blog readership within the sample. Consequently the comparative effect, relative to other social media influences, cannot be assessed. None the less, the findings are interesting and thought provoking.

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Global consumers’ motivation to go online differs depending on economic development of their countries, the Connected Consumer Study finds

Global consumers’ motivation to go online differs depending on economic development of their countries, the Connected Consumer Study finds | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

 

The global research and consulting firm A.T. Kearney has revealed the findings of its latest survey of nearly 10,000 “connected consumers”—those going online at least once a week.

 

The respondents from across ten countries—the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, Japan, Brazil, Russia, China, India, South Africa, and Nigeria—agreed on four primary motivations for using Internet, however, the extent to which those factors motivated consumers from developed and developing countries was different.

 

Here are the major highlights of the research:

 

Respondents from developed markets tend to use Internet for self-expression less, and rely on social media for shopping less than consumers from developing countries.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A compilation of some interesting stats about the differences in motives for using #digital media across the different economic development stages of ten countries. #digital #consumerbehavior

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17.9% Of Internet Users Account For More Than 80% Of Video Shares, Says Unruly - Unruly

17.9% Of Internet Users Account For More Than 80% Of Video Shares, Says Unruly - Unruly | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

New report highlights video sharing patterns across the globe Thursday, November 13, 2014: Almost one in five (17.9%) internet users share videos with their social networks more than once a week. That’s according to a new report published today by marketing technology company Unruly, which found that these “super-sharers” account for 82.4% of all video shares.

 

Unruly’s Geography of Sharing Report, which identifies key online video sharing trends from around the world, suggests that advertisers looking to drive more earned media should target these consumers.

 

The report also shows that the video ecosystem is fragmented. While the majority of video shares (59.4%) worldwide take place on Facebook, viewers share across a multitude of platforms, including Twitter (13.8%), Google+ (9.3%), Tumblr (5.7%) and Pinterest (3.9%). The report also shows that over three-quarters of video views take place outside of YouTube.

Other highlights from the report include:

The speed of social diffusion varies greatly by country. South Koreans are the fastest sharers, with 20% of shares occurring within the first 24 hours of launch;Video viewers in South Korea (28%) are also more likely to click, replay or share an ad than any other territories worldwide (source: Unruly Activate™);Happiness is the most effective emotional trigger for global campaigns, whereas social motivations are more culturally dependent;Viewers in Germany are more likely to watch an ad to the end. 79% of Germans who watched an ad stayed till the final frame. The UK was in second place with 77% (source: Unruly Activate™).
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Recent research by Unruly reveals new patterns of online consumer sharing behaviors. The research looks at sharing behaviors across countries revealing several notable behavioral differences that have implications for global marketers

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Public Perceptions of Privacy and Security in the Post-Snowden Era

Public Perceptions of  Privacy and Security in the Post-Snowden Era | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Privacy evokes a constellation of concepts for Americans—some of them tied to traditional notions of civil liberties and some of them driven by concerns about the surveillance of digital communications and the coming era of “big data.” While Americans’ associations with the topic of privacy are varied, the majority of adults in a new survey by the Pew Research Center feel that their privacy is being challenged along such core dimensions as the security of their personal information and their ability to retain confidentiality.

 

 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A summary of recent research by Pew Research reveals split opinions about government surveillance and regulation of personal #digital information and the activities of social media networks regarding #privacy and security issues. It contains some very interesting #stats. 

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US Hispanic Mobile Buyers More Inclined to Buy, Research on Device - eMarketer

US Hispanic Mobile Buyers More Inclined to Buy, Research on Device - eMarketer | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

Nearly half of US internet users—48%—have never used their mobile device to make a purchase, according to a September 2014 survey by cloud commerce provider Avangate. And for 40% of those who have yet to adopt mobile commerce, the barrier lies in safety concerns. 


An in-depth look into the 52% who are comfortable making mobile purchases shows that US Hispanic consumers are likelier than their non-Hispanic counterparts to buy via smartphone or tablet. August 2014 data from ThinkNow Research and Zpryme Research & Consulting found that approximately half of US Hispanic mobile buyers had purchased clothes, electronics, music or movie tickets within the past month. Non-Hispanic mobile buyers were significantly less likely to have made any of these purchases within the last 30 days. 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

An interesting look at #crosscultural #mobile #shopping patterns. Not only do Hispanic shoppers use mobile more than non-Hispanic for search, the product categories where they search and the search sources are also quite different. 

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Smartphone M-Commerce Revenues Grew 141 Percent In Q3 -- Report

Smartphone M-Commerce Revenues Grew 141 Percent In Q3 -- Report | Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments | Scoop.it

This morning e-commerce platform MarketLive released its Q3 Performance Index. Drawn from its customers’ aggregated traffic and conversion data, MarketLive sounded the alarm on mobile commerce: “Merchants must immediately face – and address – the enormous implications and inescapable demands of multi-device shopping and mainstream mobile commerce.

The company said that smartphone traffic to e-commerce sites grew by more than 62 percent and revenue grew 141 percent. Tablet revenue and traffic grew by a more modest 20 percent. Though still dominant, PC-based commerce growth “continued its decline.”

PCs generated 57 percent of traffic to e-commerce sites but were responsible for 76 percent of revenues in the aggregate. Smartphones drove 28 percent of traffic but only 11 percent of revenue. Tablets generated 15 percent of traffic and 13 percent of revenue.

The gap between smartphone traffic and conversions is a function of the fact that m-commerce experiences are typically suboptimal. Accordingly and as part of the broader mobile traffic shift, MarketLive reported an overall 2 percent decline in conversions vs. a year ago. Shopping cart and checkout abandonment were both higher as well, up almost 3 percent and almost 7 percent respectively.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This recent report by MarketLive points to the growing importance of #mobile shopping on #ecommerce. The article contains some very interesting #benchmarking #stats documenting the relationship and alignment of traffic and revenues. For instance, while social media accounts for 2% of the traffic it only accounts for 1% of the revenues.

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