Constructivismo Social, Relativismo epistémico y otras quimeras.
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What is Social Constructionism? | Grounded Theory

What is Social Constructionism? | Grounded Theory | Constructivismo Social, Relativismo epistémico y otras quimeras. | Scoop.it
Tom Andrews University College Cork Abstract Social Constructionism has been instrumental in remodeling grounded theory. In attempting to make sense of the social world, social constructionists view knowledge as constructed as opposed to created.
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Checar cita de Hammerslay. 

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Bruno Latour - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bruno Latour (French: [latuʁ]; born 22 June 1947) is a French sociologist of science[1] and anthropologist[2]. He is especially known for his work in the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS).[3] After teaching at the École des Mines de Paris (Centre de Sociologie de l'Innovation) from 1982 to 2006, he is now Professor at Sciences Po Paris (2006),[4] where he is the scientific director of the Sciences Po Medialab. On 13 March 2013, he was announced as the recipient of the 2013 Holberg Prize.[5][6][7]

He is best known for his books We Have Never Been Modern (1991; English translation, 1993), Laboratory Life (with Steve Woolgar, 1979) and Science in Action (1987).[8] Although his studies of scientific practice were at one time associated with social constructionist[8] approaches to the philosophy of science, Latour has diverged significantly from such approaches. Latour is best known for withdrawing from the subjective/objective division and re-developing the approach to work in practice.[1] Along with Michel Callon and John Law, Latour is one of the primary developers of actor–network theory (ANT), a constructionist approach influenced by the ethnomethodology of Harold Garfinkel, the generative semiotics of Greimas, and (more recently) the sociology of Durkheim's rival Gabriel Tarde.

His monographs earned him a 10th place among most-cited book authors in the humanities and social sciences for the year 2007.[9]

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Checar lo relacionado con "global warming".

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Model-dependent realism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Model-dependent realism is an approach to scientific inquiry, which accepts that reality can always be interpreted in a number of different ways, and focuses on the role of models of phenomena.[1] It claims that it is meaningless to talk about the "true reality" of the model as we can never be absolutely certain of anything. The only meaningful thing is the usefulness of the model.[2] The term itself was coined by Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow in their 2010 book, The Grand Design.[3]

Model-dependent realism asserts that all we can know about "reality" consists of networks of world pictures that explain observations by connecting them by rules to concepts defined in models.

A world picture consists of the combination of a set of observations accompanied by a conceptual model and by rules connecting the model concepts to the observations. Different world pictures that describe particular data equally well all have equal claims to be valid. There is no requirement that a world picture be unique, or even that the data selected include all available observations. The universe of all observations possibly may be covered by a network of overlapping world pictures and, where overlap occurs; multiple, equally valid, world pictures exist.

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¿Postura relativista...de Hawking? Investigar más en una fuente confiable. 

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Science wars - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The science wars were a series of intellectual exchanges, between scientific realists and postmodernist critics, about the nature of scientific theory and intellectual inquiry. They took place principally in the United States in the 1990s in academia and the mainstream press. The scientific realists accused the postmodernists of having effectively rejected scientific objectivity, the scientific method, and scientific knowledge. Scientific realists (such as Norman Levitt, Paul R. Gross, Jean Bricmont and Alan Sokal) argued that scientific knowledge is real, and that postmodernists thought that it is not real. Though much of the theory associated with 'postmodernism' (see poststructuralism) did not make any interventions into the natural sciences, the scientific realists took aim at its general influence. Though the scientific realists did not have any scholarly background in the fields they critiqued, they argued that large swaths of scholarship, amounting to a rejection of objectivity and realism, had been influenced by major 20th Century poststructuralist philosophers (such as Jacques Derrida, Gilles Deleuze, Jean-François Lyotard and others), whose work they declared to be incomprehensible or meaningless. They implicated a broad range of fields in this trend, including cultural studies, cultural anthropology, feminist studies, comparative literature, media studies, and science and technology studies. They accused those postmodernist critics who did actually discuss science of having a limited understanding of it.

Until the mid-20th century, the philosophy of science had concentrated on the viability of scientific method and knowledge, proposing justifications for the truth of scientific theories and observations and attempting to discover on a philosophical level why science worked. Karl Popper, an early opponent of logical positivism in the 20th century, repudiated the classical observationalist/inductivist form of scientific method in favour of empirical falsification. He is also known for his opposition to the classical justificationist account of knowledge which he replaced with critical rationalism, "the first non justificational philosophy of criticism in the history of philosophy".[1] His criticisms of scientific method were adopted by several postmodernist critiques.[2]

A number of 20th century philosophers maintained that logical models of pure science do not apply to actual scientific practice. It was the publication of Thomas Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions in 1962, however, which fully opened the study of science to new disciplines by suggesting that the evolution of science was in part sociologically determined and that it did not operate under the simple logical laws put forward by the logical positivist school of philosophy.

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Antonio Riojas's comment, April 25, 2013 1:13 AM
Leer "Continued Conflict".