Considering Education Policy
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Considering Education Policy
Thinking carefully about issues impacting children, schools, and educators.
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Who Should Decide Who Is And Isn't College Material?

Who Should Decide Who Is And Isn't College Material? | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"College, of course, isn’t for everybody, but who should decide — and how and when — which students should go and shouldn’t? In this post, Kevin Welner and Carol Burris ask whether the decision should be made by policy makers and school officials or parents and students after young people have had equitable opportunities to learn in elementary and secondary school. While college is not for everybody, opportunities to be prepared for college definitely should be. When college-educated parents have the capacity to secure the college advantage, they certainly seize it for their own children. It is not unusual, for example, to see upper middle class parents spend thousands on tutoring—including tutors for the SAT and the college essay. College-educated parents understand that a four-year diploma is key to securing financial success. However, the'“sort and select' advocates get almost everything wrong. Their fundamental two-part assumption is, first, that they can and should identify children who are beyond academic hope. Second, they believe that it is possible and beneficial to identify these children early, separate them from their academically oriented peers, and put them on a track that hopefully prepares them for post-secondary employment but does not prepare them for college." | By Kevin Welner & Carol Burris


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13 Ways High-Stakes Tests Hurt Students

13 Ways High-Stakes Tests Hurt Students | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"As we enter the March Madness of testing season, many parents and teachers have become increasingly concerned that the high-stakes attached to so many tests are actually harming our students and schools. There is particular concern about the disproportionate impact high-stakes-testing may be having on our poorest students, most struggling students, English Language Learners, and students of color. So what are the 'high-stakes' for students in high-stakes testing? Examples we’ve been hearing from parents and educators across Pennsylvania include: lost learning time, reduced content knowledge, and diverted resources to name a few." | by Jessie B. Ramey


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You Think You Know What Teachers Do. Right? Wrong.

You Think You Know What Teachers Do. Right? Wrong. | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"We all know what teachers do, right? After all, we were all students. Each one of us, each product of public education, we each sat through class after class for thirteen years. You are wrong. The problem with teaching as a profession is that every single adult citizen of this country thinks that they know what teachers do. And they don’t. So they prescribe solutions, and they develop public policy, and they editorialize, and they politicize. And they don’t listen to those who do know. Those who could teach. The teachers." | by Sarah Blaine


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America’s Fastest Growing Political Organization May Be Teach For America

America’s Fastest Growing Political Organization May Be Teach For America | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"Someone is bundling money from a select group of wealthy political donors, and passing it out to reform candidates in obscure races across the nation. In recent years we’ve seen the rise of big money being poured into local school board races from well outside the district, or city or even state where the election is being held. Millions were spent, for example, in Los Angeles school board races earlier this year. In April Ipublished a piece by a teacher in New Jersey who blogs under the name “Jersey Jazzman” about the financing of a local school board campaign, and here is a new one, about another election and the same pattern of outside funding." | by Valerie Strauss


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Teach for America’s Hidden Curriculum

Teach for America’s Hidden Curriculum | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"The history of TFA reveals the ironies of contemporary education reform. In its mission to deliver justice to underprivileged children, TFA and the liberal education reform movement have advanced an agenda that advances conservative attempts to undercut teacher’s unions. More broadly, TFA has been in the vanguard in forming a neoliberal consensus about the role of public education—and the role of public school teachers—in a deeply unequal society. In 1988, Princeton student Wendy Kopp wrote a thesis arguing for a national teacher corps, modeled on the Peace Corps— the archetype of liberal volunteerism—that 'would mobilize some of the most passionate, dedicated members of my generation to change the fact that where a child is born in the United States largely determines his or her chances in life.'  Kopp launched TFA in 1990 as a not-for-profit charged with selecting the brightest, most idealistic recent college graduates as corps members who would commit to teach for two years in some of the nation’s toughest schools. From its inception, the media anointed TFA the savior of American education. Prior to a single corps member stepping foot in a classroom, The New York Times and Newsweek lavished Kopp’s new organization with cover stories full of insipid praise. Adulation has remained the norm. Its recent twenty-year anniversary summit, held in Washington, D.C., featured fawning video remarks by President Obama and a glitzy 'who’s who' roster of liberal cheerleaders, including John Lewis, Malcolm Gladwell, Gloria Steinem, and TFA board member John Legend. The organs of middlebrow centrist opinion—Time Magazine, Atlantic Monthly, the New Republic—glorify TFA at every opportunity. The Washington Post heralds the nation’s education reform movement as the 'TFA insurgency'—a perplexing linguistic choice given so-called 'insurgency' methods have informed national education policies from Reagan to Obama. TFA is, at best, another attempt in a long history of chimerical attempts to sell educational reform as a solution to class inequality. At worst, it’s a Trojan horse for all that is unseemly about the contemporary education reform and privatization movement." | by Andrew Hartman


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Class-Size Reduction: Better Than You Think

Class-Size Reduction: Better Than You Think | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"While a series of high-profile and often controversial school reforms has gotten the lion’s share of attention from policymakers over the last decade or two, one reform appears to have been consistently ignored and marginalized: reducing the size of classes. Yet, as Professor Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach points out in a new policy brief released today, the evidence that class size reduction helps raise student achievement is strong. According to Professor Schanzenbach, class-size reduction has been the victim of a popular misconception that the strategy has been largely unsuccessful. One recent example, Schanzenbach notes, is the writer Malcolm Gladwell, who in a recent book describes small class sizes as a 'thing we are convinced is such a big advantage [but] might not be such an advantage at all.' In fact, she writes, the real story is just the opposite. 'Class size matters,' writes Schanzenbach, an economist and education policy professor at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. 'Research supports the common-sense notion that children learn more and teachers are more effective in smaller classes.' Citing evidence from the academic literature, Schanzenbach explains that 'class size is an important determinant of a variety of student outcomes ranging from test scores to broader life outcomes. Smaller classes are particularly effective at raising achievement levels of low-income and minority children.' Conversely, she points out, raising class size can be shown to be harmful to children. 'Money saved today by increasing class sizes will result in more substantial social and educational costs in the future,' she writes. 'Policymakers should carefully weigh the efficacy of class-size policy against other potential uses of funds,' Schanzenbach concludes. 'While lower class size has a demonstrable cost, it may prove the more cost-effective policy overall.'" | via National Education Policy Center

 


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Bill Gates Defends Common Core

Bill Gates Defends Common Core | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"Last month, Melinda and I published our foundation's annual letter, about myths that block progress for the poorest. We focus on myths about global issues, like the myth that foreign aid is a big waste, but when it comes to domestic issues we're in the grip of mythology, too. And these myths aren't just wrong; they're harmful, because they can lead people to fight against the best solutions to our biggest problems. Take the example of America's schools. Right now, 45 states are implementing new academic standards, known as the Common Core, which will improve education for millions of students. Unfortunately, conversation about the standards is shrouded in mythsI want to explain why Common Core is among the most important education ideas in years." | by Bill Gates

  


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Crystal Delatorre's curator insight, October 29, 2014 1:38 AM

In this article Bill Gates does have some valid points as to why we need common core. 

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A Very Scary Headline About Kindergarteners

A Very Scary Headline About Kindergarteners | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"What are we doing to young kids in school? Rob Saxton is Oregon’s deputy superintendent of public instruction. Jada Rupley is the early learning system director within the state Department of Education. Together they wrote an op-ed in The Oregonian that was published online with this headline: 'Kindergarten test results a ‘sobering snapshot’.'  What could possibly be sobering about test results from kindergarteners? What kind of tests are they giving to kindergarteners anyway Kindergarten readiness tests are nothing new. What is in the ever-increasing focus on turning kindergarten, and now preschool, into academic environments with the aim of ensuring that children can read by the time they are in first grade. In fact, kindergarten is the new first grade when it comes to academics. For some kids, learning to read in kindergarten is just fine. For many others, it isn’t. They just aren’t ready. In years gone by, kids were given time to develop and learn to read in the early grades without being seen as failures. Even kids who took time learning how to read were able to excel. Today kids aren’t given time and space to learn at their own speed." | by Valerie Strauss


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How To Escape Education's Death Valley

"Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish -- and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational "death valley" we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility." | via TED Talks


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Matt Damon: ‘Why Would You Cut Out Educators When You’re Designing Education Policy?'

Matt Damon: ‘Why Would You Cut Out Educators When You’re Designing Education Policy?' | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"Matt Damon just had an online conversation with Reddit users and he touched on a number of topics, including his opposition to standardized test-based school reform and the exclusion of teachers from the shaping of education policy. He states, 'My mom’s a professor and she’s become increasingly concerned, as have a lot of teachers, about the way policy is being designed in this country. It’s being designed by a bunch of people who aren’t teachers. I’ve always believed that they have to invite teachers into the discussion to help design policy. We would never let business men design warheads, why would you cut out educators when you’re designing education policy? I think that far too much emphasis has been put on these tests. You’re going to get teachers teaching to the test and you’re not actually giving them the leeway to do their jobs. People get tired of hearing about Finland, but they do it better than anyone, and when you look at how, it’s very simple. They have very highly trained teachers. Fifty percent of teachers here quit within five years. We just send these kids to these six-week Teach for America training courses and expect them to perform well. In Finland, one out of 10 people get into these teaching colleges. You have to go through the entire program and come out with a masters, and then you’re put in a room with another teacher and a class size no bigger than 20. It’s highly regarded; people don’t quit. Finland kicks our ass on any metric. They keep the class size down, they’re aggressive about confronting poverty." | via Valerie Strauss


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'Less Effective Teaching' Responsible For Only 2-4% Of Achievement Gap

'Less Effective Teaching' Responsible For Only 2-4% Of Achievement Gap | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"I just learned about a new study from The Department of Education titled Do Disadvantaged Students Get Less Effective Teaching? The study found, 'the differences in effective teaching between free and reduced lunch (FRL) and non-FRL students... represent 4 percent of the achievement gap in reading scores and 2 to 3 percent of the gap in math scores.' Of course, and unfortunately, Duncan’s ignoring his own Department’s research is no surprise, considering he’s doing the same by pushing merit pay even though his Department  announced last September that out of three approved studies of a New York performance pay program, one showed across the board negative effects on student achievement; another showed negative effects in some areas and no effect in others; and a third one showed no effect at all. And that his same Department has previously concluded that 90% of the elements that affect student test scores are outside the control of teachers." | by Larry Ferlazzo


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Beware! Pearson's Plan Is Coming To A Country Near You

Beware! Pearson's Plan Is Coming To A Country Near You | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"An examination of the Pearson publishing mega-giant's plan to control public education in Great Britain makes clear, the greatest threat to local initiatives in public education may be from powerful global corporations. In the United States school districts are traditionally organized and funded locally. Parents, teachers, and school and district administrators usually only think about state and national issues when they feel pressed from above by state imposed budget cuts or federal demands for curriculum change and new assessments. Much of the opposition to Common Core and Race to the Top arose because parents, teachers, and administrators felt local prerogatives were being undermined by unwarranted pressure from above. But an examination of the Pearson publishing mega-giant's plan to control public education in Great Britain makes clear, the greatest threat to local initiatives in public education may be from powerful global corporations. Beware! The Pearson Plan for education in the United Kingdom may be coming to a country near you -- unless we can stop it now." | by Alan Singer


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Time to Investigate Pearson in Texas

Time to Investigate Pearson in Texas | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"Thanks to New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, the charitable arm of testing giant Pearson will pay $7.7 million to end his investigation into whether it was illegally helping its for-profit parent company. In New York, Pearson funded its charitable foundation—legally—and then the foundation spent its money in a way that benefited its for-profit parent company—illegally. Among the verboten activities found in New York was that the Pearson Foundation 'had helped develop products for its corporate parent, including course materials and software,' according to The New York Times. Common Core is at the (pardon) core of the scandal in New York. Mercedes Schneider, a high school teacher with a Ph.D. and a healthy disrespect for corporate balderdash, did some digging and found that between 2009 and 2011, the Pearson Foundation gave $540,000 to Council of Chief State School Officers, one of two Common Core State Standards copyright holders. The Pearson Foundation also worked with the Gates Foundation to create courses based on Common Core that it sold to Pearson for $15.5 million. This kind of hand-in-glove relationship between Pearson’s foundation and for-profit interests exists in Texas. In 2009 and in 2010, the Pearson Foundation gave two endowments totaling $400,000 to the University of Texas College of Education, home to the Pearson Center for Applied Psychometric Research where they do 'cutting edge statistical and psychometric research and evaluation services to further educational improvements … and to inform educators, researchers, policymakers, and other stakeholders in the education process.' And since 2000, these policymakers have given Pearson contracts totaling $1.2 billion." | by Jason Stanford


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Jeb Bush Says Common Core Critics Care Too Much About Kids’ Self-Esteem

Jeb Bush Says Common Core Critics Care Too Much About Kids’ Self-Esteem | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"While Republican Sen. Charles Grassley of Iowa is trying to get the Common Core State Standards initiative defunded in Congress, other Republicans, especially former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, keep doing everything they can to promote the Core. Bush’s latest: He said in an interview with the Miami Herald that critics of the standards  and of standardized testing care too much about kids’ self-esteem. Bush has repeatedly explained the standards, implemented and controlled by the states, are designed to make the United States more competitive with the rest of the world. He said those who oppose the standards support the 'status quo', oppose testing and are worried too much about children’s self-esteem. 'Let me tell you something. In Asia today, they don’t care about children’s self esteem. They care about math, whether they can read – in English – whether they understand why science is important, whether they have the grit and determination to be successful,' Bush said. 'You tell me which society is going to be the winner in this 21st Century: The one that worries about how they feel, or the one that worries about making sure the next generation has the capacity to eat everybody’s lunch?' | by Valerie Strauss


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'Colorblind' Policies Exacerbate Racial Inequalities

'Colorblind' Policies Exacerbate Racial Inequalities | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"Last month, the U.S. Department of Education announced that the public school population will be less than 50 percent white, non-Hispanic for the first time in our nation’s history by this coming fall. In response to this significant milestone amid the demographic changes sweeping this country, the National Education Policy Center is releasing a new evidence-based policy brief presenting serious concerns about the capacity of the current educational policy agenda to prepare children for the 21st century. The brief’s ground-breaking analysis concludes that education reforms that ignore racial differences and disparities (so-called race-neutral or 'colorblind' education reforms) have exacerbated racial inequalities in student access to high-quality schooling. Furthermore, these reforms, which have been dominant over the past 30 years, have handicapped a whole generation of American children growing up in an increasingly racially diverse society and global economy." | via National Education Policy Center

 


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Phillip Davis's curator insight, May 14, 2014 2:31 PM

This article looks at the use of 20th century tactics to force diversity in schools and the negative impact it has on education. By trying to force racial diversity in school you create policies that influence educational inequalities. By using 21st century policies we create a great learning environment with limited inequalities.

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Finland Creates School System Based on Equality

Finland Creates School System Based on Equality | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"Finnish education often seems paradoxical to outside observers because it appears to break a lot of the rules we take for granted. Finnish children don’t begin school until age 7. They have more recess, shorter school hours than many U.S. children do (nearly 300 fewer hours per year in elementary school), and the lightest homework load of any industrialized nation. There are no gifted programs, almost no private schools, and no high-stakes national standardized tests. Yet over the past decade Finland has consistently performed among the top nations on the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), a standardized test given to 15-year olds in 65 nations and territories around the world. Finland’s school children didn’t always excel. Finland built its excellent, efficient, and equitable educational system in a few decades from scratch, and the concept guiding almost every educational reform has been equity.  The Finnish paradox is that by focusing on the bigger picture for all, Finland has succeeded at fostering the individual potential of most every child." | by Christine Gross-Loh

 


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Why I Stopped Writing Recommendation Letters for Teach for America

Why I Stopped Writing Recommendation Letters for Teach for America | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"I understand why my students find so much hope in TFA. I empathize with them. In fact, I’m a former Teach for America corps member myself. For the past nine years, I've been an instructor, a Ph.D. student, adjunct professor, and post-doctoral fellow in humanities departments at several different universities. During this time, many students have asked me to write recommendations for Teach for America. Every year, TFA installs thousands of unprepared 22-year-olds, the majority of whom are from economically and culturally privileged backgrounds, into disadvantaged public schools. They are given a class of their own after only five to six weeks of training and a scant number of hours co-teaching summer school (in a different city, frequently in a different subject, and with students in a different age group than the one they end up teaching in the fall). College and university faculty allow these well-meaning young people to become pawns in a massive game to deprofessionalize teaching. TFA may look good on their resumés and allow them to attain social capital for their bright futures in consulting firms, law schools, and graduate schools. But in exchange for this social capital, our students have to take part in essentially privatizing public schools. Additionally, despite what you might hear, there is no teaching shortage. Schools and districts fire their unionized, more expensive professional staff in order to make slots for the cheaper, eternally revolving wheel of TFA and other nontraditionally certified recruits, who quickly burn out." | by Catherine Michna

   


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The Myth Behind Public School Failure

The Myth Behind Public School Failure | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"In the rush to privatize the country’s schools, corporations and politicians have decimated school budgets, replaced teaching with standardized testing, and placed the blame on teachers and students. Until about 1980, America’s public schoolteachers were iconic everyday heroes painted with a kind of Norman Rockwell patina—generally respected because they helped most kids learn to read, write and successfully join society. Such teachers made possible at least the idea of a vibrant democracy. What led to such an ignoble fall for teachers and schools? Did public education really become so irreversibly terrible in three decades? Is there so little that’s redeemable in today’s schoolhouses?" | by Dean Paton


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Teach for America’s Deep Bench

Teach for America’s Deep Bench | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"'Will we seize the moment?' Former New York City schools chancellor Joel Klein spoke those words at Teach for America’s 20th anniversary summit last summer. Coming from Klein, who is now a divisional leader at Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp, incitements to political uprising might raise some eyebrows. But at the summit for the nonprofit, which recruits college graduates to be teachers in poor school districts around the country, Klein was onto something that Nicholas Kristof and Thomas Friedman have ignored in their eight pro-TFA columns: behind the veil of well-funded, debate-worthy idealism, TFA is coordinating a political revolution. Since its founding, TFA has amassed some 28,000 alumni. Two have made Time’s 'Most Influential' list: its Chief Executive Officer and founder, Wendy Kopp, and former Washington, D.C., schools chancellor and StudentsFirst founder Michelle Rhee. Others have gained prominence as the leaders of massive charter operations, like KIPP Schools and New Schools for New Orleans. And TFA alums are currently the heads of public schools in Newark, D.C., and Tennessee. What about the other 27,000-some-odd people? That’s where Leadership for Educational Equity, or LEE, comes in. LEE was founded in 2007 as a 501(c)4 spin-off of Teach for America to provide resources, training, and networking for alumni who are interested in elected office or other extracurricular leadership positions. Its goals are ambitious: by 2015, as its standard job posting reads, it hopes to have 250 of its members in elected office, 300 in policy or advocacy leadership roles, and 1,000 “in ‘active’ pipelines for public leadership. If all goes as planned, LEE could shift control over American education reform to a specific group of spritely college grads-turned-politicians with a very specific politics." | by James Cersonsky


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Rebranding Common Core To Escape Controversy

Rebranding Common Core To Escape Controversy | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"In the face of growing opposition to the Common Core State Standards — a set of K-12 educational guidelines adopted by most of the country — officials in a handful of states are worried that the brand is already tainted. They’re keeping the standards but slapping on fresh names they hope will have greater public appeal. At a recent meeting of the Council of Chief State School Officers, one of the organizations that helped create the standards, former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee (R) urged state education leaders to ditch the 'Common Core' name, noting that it had become 'toxic.' 'Rebrand it, refocus it, but don’t retreat,' said Huckabee, now the host of a Fox News talk show and a supporter of the standards. The changes are largely superficial, giving new labels to national standards that are taking hold in classrooms across the country. But the desire to market them differently shows how precarious the push for the Common Core has grown, even though the standards were established by state officials with bipartisan support and quickly earned widespread approval, including the endorsement of the Obama administration." | by Lyndsey Layton

 


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The Trouble With Calls For Universal ‘High-Quality’ Pre-K

The Trouble With Calls For Universal ‘High-Quality’ Pre-K | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"Universal pre-kindergarten education finally seems to be gathering momentum. President Obama highlighted the issue in his 2013 State of the Union address and then mentioned it again in this year’s. Numerous states and cities are launching or expanding early-education initiatives, and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has made this his signature issue. Disagreements persist about the details of funding, but a real consensus has begun to develop that all young children deserve what has until now been unaffordable by low-income families. But here’s the catch: Very few people are talking about the kind of education that would be offered — other than declaring it should be 'high quality.' And that phrase is often interpreted to mean 'high intensity': an accelerated version of skills-based teaching that most early-childhood experts regard as terrible. Poor children, as usual, tend to get the worst of this. Further, this doesn’t leave much time for play.[4] But even to the extent we want to promote meaningful learning in young children, the methods are likely to be counterproductive, featuring an emphasis on the direct instruction of skills and rote rehearsal of facts. This is the legacy of behaviorism: Children are treated as passive receptacles of knowledge, with few opportunities to investigate topics and pose questions that they find intriguing. In place of discovery and exploration, tots are trained to sit still and listen, to memorize lists of letters, numbers, and colors. Their success or failure is relentlessly monitored and quantified, and they’re 'reinforced' with stickers or praise for producing right answers and being compliant." | by Alfie Kohn


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Colorado's Slow Rollout Of Teacher Evaluations Could Hold Advantages

Colorado's Slow Rollout Of Teacher Evaluations Could Hold Advantages | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"Colorado ranked among national leaders in adopting a new teacher evaluation system but has lagged in implementing it, according to experts who also note that such a strategy could prove beneficial. School districts across the state began implementing the teacher evaluation system this school year, nearly four years after passage of the law that tied educator effectiveness to student performance. 'What we see is this systemic change is hard,' she added. 'It's a lot to learn, and it makes people uncomfortable. As states get into the second year, that discomfort dissipates — on the teachers' part and on administrators' part.' Colorado is among two-thirds of states that have passed laws since 2009 reforming educator evaluation systems in an effort to tap federal stimulus money and qualify for waivers from mandates established through No Child Left Behind. But while some states hurried to implement evaluation systems, Colorado formed committees of educators and built guidelines for the system." | via The Denver Post


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One Thing Bill Gates Could Do That Would Actually Help Kids

One Thing Bill Gates Could Do That Would Actually Help Kids | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"For years Bill Gates and other billionaire philanthropists, along with government officials, have been “reforming” our public schools. During this period, hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent creating charter and virtual schools; de-professionalizing teaching; pushing testing policies that have led to the reduction or elimination of libraries and art, music and physical education in many schools; promoting larger class sizes; and more. Have these interventions produced higher scores on competitive tests and improved the education experience of students?  No. Here’s a suggestion for Bill and other philanthropists who want to reform our public schools: FEED THE CHILDREN. Concentrating on this one thing would cause test scores to soar." | by Debby Mayer


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Ravitch: "The White House's Obsession With Data Is Sick"

Ravitch: "The White House's Obsession With Data Is Sick" | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"Diane Ravitch, the education historian who has led a de facto national movement against current education policies — including standardized testing, charter schools, vouchers and teacher evaluations tied to student test scores — said Tuesday evening that 'the White House’s obsession with data is sick.' Ravitch was being feted at the American Federation of Teachers headquarters by the union’s president, Randi Weingarten. The two spent some time on Capitol Hill Tuesday, meeting with lawmakers,including Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.). 'She was walking the halls of Congress, not to lobby a bill, but to lobby an ideology on behalf of children,' Weingarten told the gathering. Asked about the latest reform trend — ideas around the importance of developing character traits like ‘grit’ and ‘determination’ in students to help them succeed academically — Ravitch said she didn’t think those traits in children could or should be measured. Constant measurement and reducing children to numerical scores are wrong, she told the adoring crowd of union activists and progressives. 'My grandchildren are not global competitors — they’re children,' she said. 'I don’t know whether this is a period of madness or greed,' Ravitch said, calling her opponents ‘education deformers.’ But what we’re doing is not helping children.'” | By Lyndsey Layton

 

 


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America's Prep Schools Aren't Following Duncan's Reforms

America's Prep Schools Aren't Following Duncan's Reforms | Considering Education Policy | Scoop.it

"Our public education system, with all of its admitted flaws, manages to nurture the vast majority of young people, many of whom go on to be hugely successful. But the prevailing education reform movement in the United States, premised upon market-based solutions, economics, disruption, and similar sounding corporate buzzwords, seeks to standardize curriculum, teaching, and assessment as a method of control. If the reforms mandated by Departments of Education and fawned over by upstart think-tankers were as fantastic as advised again and again, then you can bet that every single one of the country's best prep schools would be implementing them as rapidly as possible. They're not, and you shouldn't accept them either." | by Shaun Johnson


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