Canada and its politics
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Canada and its politics
What Canadians think about politics and their (Non Westminster) Parliament
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Canadian shelters forced to turn away majority of women and children in need

Canadian shelters forced to turn away majority of women and children in need | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
On one typical day late last year, 416 women and children across Canada sought shelter to escape violence. Of that total, however, shelters were forced to turn away 73 per cent of those in need due to a lack of resources and capacity, an annual tally to be released Thursday shows.

The findings of the report demonstrate the degree of need across the country, where it says a “significant proportion” of shelters are chronically at overcapacity. The report, entitled Shelter Voices, also reveals the frequency with which women and children cross provincial borders to flee violence – nearly half, or 44 per cent, of shelters had received women from other provinces or territories in the past month alone.

“Clearly, fleeing abuse is a challenge that crosses borders,” the report said, adding that the issue of violence against women must be addressed at the national level, in addition to provincial efforts.
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malek's comment, April 28, 6:49 PM
fleeing domestic abuse was not a major topic in the last election when 1 in every 3 women suffers
pdeppisch's comment, April 28, 9:54 PM
I support a local shelter for 20 years and had hoped that the problem would be solved by now. It is as bad as ever. http://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2014/03/18/disturbing_snapshot_of_womens_shelters_goar.html I have no idea why Wynne or Clark or Notley won't attend to the problem and apparently neither does Merkel seem to care about women problems in Germany. :(
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Corporate Canada Poured More Than $270B In Tax Havens Last Year

Corporate Canada Poured More Than $270B In Tax Havens Last Year | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
OTTAWA — New figures on direct foreign investment released by Statistics Canada show that corporate Canada has been pouring billions of dollars more into offshore tax havens.

Canadians for Tax Fairness crunched the numbers and found that Canadian corporations in 2015 invested more than $270 billion in the top 10 tax haven destinations for Canadian capital, an increase of 17 per cent over 2014.

Barbados was the top destination, attracting $79.9 billion, up 14 per cent over the previous year.

Four other countries in Canada's top 10 — Cayman Islands, Bermuda, Switzerland and Hong Kong — all saw year-over-year increases of at least 34 per cent in 2015.

Dennis Howlett of the advocacy group Canadians for Tax Fairness says corporations are using legal measures to route investment through tax havens in order to avoid paying taxes on profits in Canada.
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Did this company engineer the largest tax dodge in Canadian history?

Did this company engineer the largest tax dodge in Canadian history? | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
For Don Kossick it’s been a lonely battle – a sort of one-man crusade, if you will.


The Saskatoon-based activist and community organizer runs Saskatchewan Citizens for Tax Fairness, which lobbies against corporate tax evasion. Two years ago, Kossick managed to raise enough money to pay for a billboard sign in downtown Saskatoon with the blaring headline “Pay Up Cameco”.

Headquartered in Saskatoon, Cameco Corp. is the world’s largest publicly-traded uranium company – producing as much as 15 to 20 percent of the global uranium supply. In fact, it provides most of the uranium used in Canada’s nuclear reactors.
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Notley: Pipeline Debate Making Canada Act 'Like A Bunch Of Villages'

Notley: Pipeline Debate Making Canada Act 'Like A Bunch Of Villages' | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
If Canada wants to eventually move to a de-carbonized future, the country's present must include pipelines, says Alberta Premier Rachel Notley.

"All the things we need to do to get to a de-carbonized economy...that doesn't happen for free," Notley told Terry Milewski in an interview on CBC Radio's The House.

"We have a revenue source that will help fund that, but we're giving it away at a discount because we're acting like a bunch of villages as opposed to a nation."
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malek's comment, April 23, 2:42 PM
fossil fuel is the name of the game despite all warnings
pdeppisch's comment, April 23, 4:47 PM
Yes - our civilization is based on fossil fuel and until we figure out fusion it will probably stay that way. WHat I don't like is that we are increasing our numbers to the detriment of the rest of the life on earth and we are pollution like mad. It ain't just the CO2. We are fucking over the planet real good with pollution, toxic chemicals and plastics and and and
malek's comment, April 23, 6:01 PM
Population growth is negative in the 1st world, this is the real risk of civilization, you can add pollution here
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‘It’s the Last Place We Have for Our People’: Doig River’s Last Stand Amidst Fracking Boom

‘It’s the Last Place We Have for Our People’: Doig River’s Last Stand Amidst Fracking Boom | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
In the heart of one of the continent’s biggest fracking booms stands a place the people of the Doig River First Nation have revered for generations.

Elders remember visiting this ancient spruce forest in northeastern B.C. as children on horseback. There they’d hunt moose, grieve their loved ones, heal their spirits.

So as oil and gas wells began to crop up all over their traditional territory, the elders of Doig River decided to do something to protect their most sacred place.
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Opposition to Petronas LNG 'Extensive,' First Nations Leaders Tell Trudeau

Opposition to Petronas LNG 'Extensive,' First Nations Leaders Tell Trudeau | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
First Nations from northwest B.C. are strong in their opposition to a proposed liquefied natural gas project near Prince Rupert and will fight it in the courts and on the land if it is approved, a delegation of senior aboriginal leaders warned the federal Liberal government Tuesday. 

The group travelled to Ottawa to urge the government to reject Petronas’s Pacific Northwest LNG project at the same time as six municipal politicians from northern B.C. travelled to Ottawa in an effort to persuade the federal government to support LNG projects in the province.
 
Cabinet is expected to make a decision on the environmental assessment of the $11.4-billion Petronas project by late June.
 
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The Company(ies) BC Hydro Keeps

The Company(ies) BC Hydro Keeps | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
Another month, another Site C dam contract. Yet again, it's with one of those almost — but not quite — Canadian companies.

On April 6, Canadian Press quoted Premier Christy Clark as stating “Montreal-based Voith Hydro Inc. will design, supply and install six turbines, six generators and associated equipment.”

Voith would be more accurately described as a family-owned, German-based company with operations in Montreal and dozens of other locations around the world. It may seem trivial, but it's not the first time BC Hydro has taken liberties with postal codes.

In a news release last November, it announced the selection of Peace River Hydro Partners as the preferred proponent for the $1.75 billion Site C main civil works contract.

Peace River Hydro Partners is comprised of Samsung C&T Canada, Acciona Infrastructure Canada and Petrowest.
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Ottawa Still Censoring Websites in Government Departments, Union Says | The Tyee

Ottawa Still Censoring Websites in Government Departments, Union Says | The Tyee | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
The head of a union representing government scientists and other civil servants wants to know why the government is still blocking access to a wide range of websites in certain departments, saying it prevents the workers from doing their jobs.

The president of the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada, Debi Daviau, said Internet restrictions imposed on workers by the former Conservative government remain in effect even though the Liberals took power late last year.

"No changes have been made as of yet," said Daviau, whose union represents 57,000 members.
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Alberta Taxpayers Sick Of Paying For Private Schools: Poll

Alberta Taxpayers Sick Of Paying For Private Schools: Poll | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
Albertans are fed up with seeing public money fund private schools, especially after the historic deficit unveiled in the province's latest budget, according to a recent poll.

A Mainstreet Research poll released Monday suggests nearly two-thirds of Albertans don't want to see taxpayer money supporting private schools.
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Ottawa called out on residential-school settlement shortfall

Ottawa called out on residential-school settlement shortfall | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
The federal government must pick up the tab for more than $20-million in compensation to survivors of Indian residential schools after its lawyer allowed the Catholic Church to renege on its obligations, according to the former national chief whose advocacy resulted in the largest class-action settlement in Canadian history.

Phil Fontaine, who has spoken publicly about the abuses he suffered as a child at one of the schools, helped to negotiate the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement and says the government must ensure that its terms are met.

“The government is ultimately responsible for meeting all of the financial obligations,” Mr. Fontaine told The Globe and Mail on Monday in response to the news that miscommunication by a federal lawyer allowed the Catholic Church to walk away from its promise to try to raise $25-million to pay for healing and reconciliation programs for the survivors.
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Big jump in number of RCMP misconduct cases in 2015

Big jump in number of RCMP misconduct cases in 2015 | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
The number of misconduct investigations the RCMP launched into their own staff went up by 158 per cent in 2015 over the previous year, leaving 56 officers facing possible dismissal over allegations of serious misconduct. 

Details of the development are contained in a document posted to the RCMP website called Results and Respect in the RCMP Workplace.

The document appears to be a means of updating the public on how the national police force has followed through on the findings and recommendations from the Mounties' Gender-Based Assessment and Gender and Respect Action Plan, in 2012 and 2013 respectively.
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Tribal leader to spotlight 'real costs of oil' in B.C.

Tribal leader to spotlight 'real costs of oil' in B.C. | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
Beaver Lake Cree Nation tribal leader Crystal Lameman will discuss the negative environmental effects of tar sands mining Wednesday during a tour stop in Emmett Township.

Lameman's presentation, "The Real Costs of Oil: The Case for Justice at the Ends of the Pipeline," is part of a multi-city tour spanning western Canada, Ontario and Michigan. The Beaver Lake Cree Nation is native to the Canadian province of Alberta, where there are large deposits of heavy crude oil, able to produce more than a million barrels of oil per day.

Lameman, the tribe's intergovernmental affairs and industry relations treaty coordinator and communications manager, is expected to argue about the "devastating impacts" of tar sands mining on the environment and on public health. Her tribe launched litigation in 2008 against the Canadian government, claiming that fossil fuel projects in their territory "violate treaty rights and threaten to destroy their way of life," according to a Tuesday news release by the Michigan Chapter of the Sierra Club.
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Poorest children in Canada falling even further behind | Toronto Star

Poorest children in Canada falling even further behind | Toronto Star | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
Canada ranked 26th out of 35 nations in UNICEF study looking at well-being of children in bottom 10 per cent of family income.

Via Velvet Martin
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Velvet Martin's comment, April 15, 1:30 PM
http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2016/04/14/poorest-children-in-canada-falling-even-further-behind.html Poorest children in Canada falling even further behind




Canada ranked 26th out of 35 nations in UNICEF study looking at well-being of children in bottom 10 per cent of family income. By: Jim Coyle News, Published on Thu Apr 14 2016












































































Among the world’s rich countries, Canada is one of the more unequal societies for children, according to a new UNICEF report on the well-being of young people.







“In the international Olympics of child well-being, there isn’t much to celebrate,” UNICEF Canada said in a companion analysis released Thursday.







David Morley, president and CEO of UNICEF Canada, told the Star “we need to make some investments” because “if we make things better for our poorest children, it makes them better for our society and builds the kind of society we want to think we are.”







The global report, “UNICEF’s Report Card 13: Fairness for Children,” focused on what is called “bottom-end inequality” — how far the poorest children are allowed to fall behind the average of their peers.







It looked at the difference in four key areas — income, health, education and life satisfaction — between those children at the bottom 10 per cent of family income and those in the middle.













In 2013, Canada ranked 17th out of 29 affluent countries. In this latest study, Canada is 26th out of 35 nations.







“Canada is one of the more unequal societies for children,” said the UNICEF Canada report titled “Fairness for Children: Canada’s Challenge.”







“The growing gaps suggest that life is becoming more difficult for the most excluded children as social inequality has widened, and it is showing up in their physical and mental health.”







Alarmingly, Canada has one of the highest proportions of children reporting very low life satisfaction, which is associated with poor mental health and risky behaviour.







“If you see that even the middle is leaving you behind, then how can you feel life satisfaction?” Morley said in an interview.







For the last several decades, market forces have driven up income inequality and “we didn’t really clue in to what it meant to children,” he said.







“We’re a more competitive society, I think, and there are more winners and losers.” For those on the short end of things, “it’s easier to feel hopeless. It’s easier to feel outside of the mainstream. You’re being told all the time you’re not part of it.”







For indigenous and racialized communities, especially, there is a sense of “being beyond the fringe, not even on the fringes,” Morley said.







In Attawapiskat, where the Cree community on the James Bay coast is experiencing a crisis of suicide attempts among young people, “that must be part of it,” Morley said. “Those young people must feel so outside, and so without hope.”







Morley praised commitments by the new federal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau as a solid start to closing the gaps.







The promised Canada Child Benefit, the commitment to curbing the marketing of unhealthy food and drinks to children, development of a national early years’ strategy to support child care and learning, and a commitment to greater flexibility for parental leave will “all help in moving Canada’s kids to the front of the pack,” he said.







UNICEF Canada wants all levels of government to invest more and earlier in children, improve monitoring, data gathering and get “better at listening to kids,” and establish child-impact assessments that ensure child well-being and equality is at the forefront of policy planning.







Failure to address such crucial disparities creates lasting economic and social divisions that reverberate at great cost for generations, the UNICEF Canada report warned.







But “when we do make those investments that help the farthest-behind group, it helps all of society,” Morley said. “It helps all children.”







For Canada as a society, “it’s an opportunity to be who we say we are, and be who we want to be.”































Key Findings:




•Most areas of child well-being showed no improvement in Canada over the last decade.




•The poorest children in Canada have family incomes 53 per cent lower than the average child.




•In Canada, nine per cent of children reported very low life satisfaction, more than the average among rich countries




•Canada ranks 14th out of 37 countries in education inequality, 25th of 35 in life-satisfaction inequality.




•Boys and girls are “differently” unequal, with boys more likely to fall behind in education, girls more likely to fall behind in health and life satisfaction.



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Christy Clark’s private ‘allowance’ from B.C. Liberals is no joke

Christy Clark’s private ‘allowance’ from B.C. Liberals is no joke | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
It is fair to ask whether one of the reasons B.C. Premier Christy Clark steadfastly refuses to ban corporate donations as other provinces have is because it could impact the amount of money she receives from her party for being leader.

It is not an insignificant amount.
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Trans Mountain Tar Sands Pipeline 'Final Harpoon' for Endangered Killer Whales

Trans Mountain Tar Sands Pipeline 'Final Harpoon' for Endangered Killer Whales | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
At the beginning of last week, environmentalists celebrated when the largest energy infrastructure company in North America, Kinder Morgan, pulled the plug on its controversial natural gas pipeline which had been proposed through parts of Massachusetts and Southern New Hampshire, called NorthEast Energy Direct.

But the energy giant is pushing ahead with other contentious pipelines, not least its Trans Mountain pipeline that connects the dirty tar sands in Alberta to an oil terminal in Burnaby, in British Colombia.
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Documents reveal troubling details about long-term solitary confinement

Documents reveal troubling details about long-term solitary confinement | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
Forty per cent of Ontario inmates who were locked away in solitary confinement for 30 or more straight days – twice the limit permitted under the United Nations’ Nelson Mandela Rules – suffered from mental-health issues or other special needs, an analysis of more than 600 inmate records from the last five months of 2014 found.

The Globe and Mail obtained 1,100 pages of Ontario detainee records. The names of the inmates are redacted but thousands of terse staff notations shed light on segregation, a restrictive form of incarceration.

Redactions obscure exactly how many inmates were housed in prolonged segregation over the five-month span the records cover, but the total is at least 360 inmates. The average in solitary for that group was 103 days.


“The UN Mandela Rules were crafted to recognize ‘What does the evidence tell us about when solitary confinement becomes torture?’ And for them, the line was 15 days in a row,” said Justin Piché, who specializes in prison issues as an assistant professor of criminology at the University of Ottawa. “We’re at 103 days straight as an average? That’s unconscionable.”
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Bill Honouring Indigenous Rights Gets a Do-Over | The Tyee

Bill Honouring Indigenous Rights Gets a Do-Over | The Tyee | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
Nearly a year since a similar effort was killed by the Tory government, a bill to recognize Indigenous people's rights in accordance with a United Nations declaration was tabled Thursday in Ottawa.

This time, the bill could pass.

"I'm pretty confident," said Romeo Saganash, a residential school survivor and the NDP MP behind the private members' bill.

Saganash's bill would primarily "ensure the laws of Canada respect" the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People, meaning Canadian laws would have to abide by the document's stipulations.

The Quebec MP spent more than two decades working on the declaration, which was finalized in 2008 and endorsed by Canada in 2010.
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Vancouver Port Regulator Under Conflict of Interest Fire Over Coal Lobby Membership

Vancouver Port Regulator Under Conflict of Interest Fire Over Coal Lobby Membership | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
With news of the Port of Vancouver ruffling the feathers of the federal government by issuing a permit for a jet fuel pipeline without so much as a heads up, the port authority’s integrity has been thrust into the spotlight yet again.

While the port has apologized to Transport Minister Marc Garneau, the thorny issue of the port conducting environmental reviews of projects, while profiting from the same projects, remains.

Complicating matters, the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (which regulates the Port of Vancouver) is a member of the Coal Association of Canada — a lobby group that glosses over the impacts of burning coal on climate change and that has gained notoriety in recent weeks for spreading misinformation about the phase-out of coal-fired electricity in Alberta.
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Clean Energy Breaking into B.C. Market With Remarkable $8.6 Billion in Investments: New Report

Clean Energy Breaking into B.C. Market With Remarkable $8.6 Billion in Investments: New Report | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
Clean power projects, such as run-of-river, thermal, solar and wind operations, are providing about 14 per cent of BC Hydro’s domestic supply of electricity and account for $8.6 billion in capital investment in the province, according to a new report commissioned by Clean Energy BC.
 
The report by MNP, a chartered accountancy and business advisory firm, finds investments have been made throughout the province, including in First Nations communities and areas hit by the recent collapse in global commodity markets.
 
“Clean Energy Projects can help diversify the economies of local communities by providing another source of employment in communities that may have traditionally relied on mining or forestry to provide the majority of local employment,” the report states.
 
Many of the 101 independent power projects currently in operation are owned by First Nations or have benefit or revenue-sharing agreements with local First Nations.
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Joining TPP will yield limited gains for Canada, report says

Joining TPP will yield limited gains for Canada, report says | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
Canada stands to make “relatively modest” economic gains by joining the Trans-Pacific Partnership, while the bulk of the spoils from the 12-country trade deal go to the United States, Japan and Vietnam.

That’s the conclusion of a C.D. Howe Institute study being released on Thursday.

“There is some money in the TPP for Canada, but the trade gains are relatively modest,” say the authors, C.D. Howe fellow and economist Dan Ciuriak and colleagues Ali Dadkhah and Jingliang Xiao. “Even ambitious, so-called deep and comprehensive agreements like the TPP have limited traction in what is an already highly open global economy.”
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pdeppisch's comment, April 22, 1:54 PM
I beg to differ - greedy elites who don't give a shit and their motto is: "Après nous le déluge"
malek's comment, April 22, 6:51 PM
"le deluge" is a fact
pdeppisch's comment, April 22, 6:58 PM
Yes - it is happening!
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Harper Era Was 'Dark Age' For Press Freedom, Watchdog Says

Harper Era Was 'Dark Age' For Press Freedom, Watchdog Says | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
Canada went through a "dark age" for press freedom during the government of Stephen Harper, but "only time will tell" if things will improve under the Trudeau government, an international media watchdog said Wednesday.

Canada fell 10 spots to 18th place in the latest ranking of press freedom from Paris-based Reporters Without Borders (RSF), while the U.S. rose eight spots to 41st place.

"With mounting concern over the government’s 'growing secrecy' and rampant bureaucracy in executing Access to Information (ATI) requests, Stephen Harper’s reign was considered a 'dark age' for journalism," RSF said in its report. "Current Prime Minister Trudeau has strongly advocated for a 'free media' but only time will tell if his promises will be fulfilled."
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Gov't Using Misleading Accounting at BC Hydro, Charges Dix | The Tyee

Gov't Using Misleading Accounting at BC Hydro, Charges Dix | The Tyee | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
The British Columbia government has chosen to use misleading accounting at BC Hydro to fudge the province's finances ahead of the 2017 election, charges NDP energy critic Adrian Dix.

"They misled people about the state of B.C.'s finances, and they misled people about the state of BC Hydro's finances," said Dix, the MLA for Vancouver-Kingsway, in an interview. "This will affect every single person in the province."
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pdeppisch's comment, April 20, 7:13 PM
Actually - it always has been very creative! That is why we have "Generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP)" He he he but still lots of wriggle room and usually no one cries tilt! :)
malek's comment, April 21, 7:02 AM
enter culinary science, cooking the books is trendy..lol
pdeppisch's comment, April 21, 12:35 PM
LOL D)
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Oilsands May Never Recover If Climate-Change Targets Happen

Oilsands May Never Recover If Climate-Change Targets Happen | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
What's good for the planet won't be great for the oilsands, if two recent studies are any indication.

The price of oil could level out at anywhere between $83 and $87 per barrel from 2030 to 2050 if countries manage to pass lower-carbon policies, says a report from U.K.-based consultancy Cambridge Econometrics.

And with a break-even price of about $80 per barrel, any new oilsands mining projects would only barely make back their investment.
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TPP Consultation Turns Away Scores of Lower Mainlanders | The Tyee

TPP Consultation Turns Away Scores of Lower Mainlanders | The Tyee | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
Scores of Lower Mainland residents who wanted to tell the House of Commons Standing Committee on International Trade what they think of the 12-country Trans-Pacific Partnership trade and investment deal negotiated by the Harper Conservatives were denied that chance Monday.

More than 50 people rallied outside the Richmond Radisson Hotel where the hearings were scheduled to be held, eventually being frisked before entering the hearing hall on a red carpet laid by protesters that read "170,000 Say No to TPP" -- referring to the number of signatures on an anti-TPP petition.
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Legal misstep lets Catholic Church off hook for residential schools compensation

Legal misstep lets Catholic Church off hook for residential schools compensation | Canada and its politics | Scoop.it
A miscommunication by a federal lawyer allowed the Catholic Church to renege on its obligation to try to raise $25-million to pay for healing programs for the survivors of Indian residential schools.

Of that amount, the Church raised only $3.7-million, and a financial statement suggests less than $2.2-million of that was actually donated to help former students cope with the trauma inflicted by the residential schools.

The legal misstep occurred when Ottawa was pressing the Church to pay the entirety of a related cash settlement stemming from the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, the largest class-action deal in Canadian history.
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