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A Win in the Ground War Against Elephant Poachers in Africa - The New Yorker

A Win in the Ground War Against Elephant Poachers in Africa - The New Yorker | Conservation Success | Scoop.it
Peter Canby on the arrest and imminent trial of Samuel Pembele, who is suspected of being a top figure in elephant-ivory poaching in northern Congo.
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It’s a girl: rare rhino gives birth to second calf in Sumatra

It’s a girl: rare rhino gives birth to second calf in Sumatra | Conservation Success | Scoop.it
A milestone in the international effort to bring a critically endangered species back from the brink of extinction.
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Nepal Celebrates Two Consecutive Years of Zero Rhino Poaching :: ANNAMITICUS

Nepal Celebrates Two Consecutive Years of Zero Rhino Poaching :: ANNAMITICUS | Conservation Success | Scoop.it
Nepal's success is the result of a multi-pronged strategy - a strategy which does *not* include speculating on rhino horn trade nor does it include rhino trophy hunting.
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India's Tigers May Be Rebounding, in Rare Success for Endangered Species

India's Tigers May Be Rebounding, in Rare Success for Endangered Species | Conservation Success | Scoop.it
Members of the tiger conservation community are hailing a rise in tiger numbers in India.
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72 tigers seen in camera traps at Nagarhole

72 tigers seen in camera traps at Nagarhole | Conservation Success | Scoop.it
Meanwhile, Minister for Forests B. Ramanath Rai has said the process for declaration of Cauvery and M.M. Hills Wildlife Sanctuaries as tiger reserves was underway. With support from forest dwellers as
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In Tanzania, Conservation Benefits Communities

In Tanzania, Conservation Benefits Communities | Conservation Success | Scoop.it
Since supporting the establishment of the College of African Wildlife Management (Mweka) on the slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro in 1963, AWF has continued to work with the government of Tanzania and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).
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Snow leopards: Big cats on the roof of the world - CNN.com

Snow leopards: Big cats on the roof of the world - CNN.com | Conservation Success | Scoop.it
The snow leopard is one of the most enigmatic and least understood of the big cats, says Panthera's Tom McCarthy.
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California condors rise from the brink of extinction

California condors rise from the brink of extinction | Conservation Success | Scoop.it
The California condor, North America's largest bird, once soared through the skies from Washington state to Mexico and into Arizona and Utah. By 1983, however, the loss of habitat and food sources had so crippled the king of the vultures that only 22 were left in the wild.
Over the following four...
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Prince William Has Sparked Breakthrough In China's Stance On Tackling Illegal Trade In Ivory And Rhino Horn, William Hague Reveals

Prince William Has Sparked Breakthrough In China's Stance On Tackling Illegal Trade In Ivory And Rhino Horn, William Hague Reveals | Conservation Success | Scoop.it
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Better Value in Health Care Requires Focusing on Outcomes

Better Value in Health Care Requires Focusing on Outcomes | Conservation Success | Scoop.it
The volume-driven system is in its dying days.
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Appealing to empathy encourages green behavior - Conservation

Appealing to empathy encourages green behavior - Conservation | Conservation Success | Scoop.it
How can people be convinced to act in an environmentally-friendly way? Try “empathy conservation”.
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The week in wildlife – in pictures

The week in wildlife – in pictures | Conservation Success | Scoop.it
Fighting hippos, flamingoes in the Great Rift Valley and a snow leopard in Himalayas feature in this week’s pick of images from the natural world Continue reading...
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Orangutans Rescued From Indonesian Forest Fires Released Back Into Wild | Jakarta Globe

Orangutans Rescued From Indonesian Forest Fires Released Back Into Wild | Jakarta Globe | Conservation Success | Scoop.it

Three orangutans rescued when forest fires destroyed their Indonesian rainforest habitats were returned to the wild on Borneo island last week


Via Wildlife Defence
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Safarious Journal - RWANDA'S ROARING SUCCESS

Safarious Journal - RWANDA'S ROARING SUCCESS | Conservation Success | Scoop.it
A good news conservation story. When you think about Conservation in Africa you probably think of a battle that is being lost. The local and international conservation headlines read desperate times for wildlife. But it’s not all doom and gloom.
Good news arrived on the evening of May 12th, as Shema, one of five lionesses reintroduced to Akagera National Park in Rwanda, was spotted with three new cubs. Two of the other lionesses, sisters Umwari and Kazi are also suspected to be pregnant after mating with the dominant male, Ntwari.
Lions have not been present here since the Rwandan Genocide two decades ago. But In June 2015, the quiet was broken by a roar when African Parks successfully relocated seven South African lions to Akagera, including five females and two males.
Akagera has a host of success stories, from fragile dragonflies to mighty lions. It is the oldest of Rwanda’s three national parks and the only protected Savannah region in the country. At 112,000 Hectares it is viable size for a thriving ecosystem and is home to more than 8,000 large mammals and 500 bird species. At present her wildlife populations are flourishing thanks to effective law enforcement and community engagement, and it’s not just the wildlife that is thriving, local communities are too. But it wasn’t always like this.
In 1994 the Rwandan genocide not only decimated Rwanda’s people but its wildlife populations too. After the cessation of violence, portions of parkland were distributed to returning refugees as farmland. However, an absence of park management coupled with one of the highest population densities in Africa resulted in human wildlife conflict and lion populations quickly disappeared from Akagera.
In 2010 The Akagera Management Company was established. Spearheaded by African Parks and The Rwandan Development board this partnership launched a number of flagship projects and is one of the main reasons why the park is returning to its once wild abundance. These projects not only create employment opportunities for local communities but also mitigate human wildlife conflict in the settlements around the park.
The ripple effects are far-reaching for both wildlife and humans; with increased community involvement and a flourishing wildlife population, the tourism appeal of Akagera is growing and guides and rangers in the park are improving their skills.
A number of livelihood diversification projects have been successfully implemented to address these needs, such as the Community Freelance Guides organisation which offers professional guiding services. This enables local guides to gain financially from growing tourism at Akagera, and encourages locals to appreciate and get more involved in conservation.
The most recent success at Akagera has been the reintroduction of lions to the park. The new lions are genetically diverse, specifically selected from two different lion families to ensure the strongest possible gene pool for the founding stock. The two male lions come from a government reserve on the Mozambican border called Tembe Elephant Park, and they are totally unrelated. The females come from three different prides and were bonded prior to their relocation. All the lions were thoroughly vetted and each has been microchipped so that they can be individually identified.
Every detail was taken care of in the procurement of the lions; Rwanda is a very specific environment, humid and prone to rain with lush green and swampy landscapes. The lions come from a humid area not far from the coastal regions in South Africa, so little adaptation is necessary.
Even the Community members have welcomed the lions back to Rwanda. They identify the arrival of lions as a new draw card for their growing tourism market and are excited to be involved in the success of the park.
It has been several months and the lions appear to be doing well. After their long absence, many rangers at Akagera had never experienced lions and did not know what to expect when patrolling in the field. African Parks drew on the expertise of Lion Guardians to train their rangers to become protectors and ambassadors for these lions. Lion Guardians is a conservation organisation dedicated to finding and enacting long-term solutions for people and lions to coexist.
Plans are also in place to reintroduce black rhino, a species that has not been seen in the park for almost a decade. Canine dog units have been trained to reduce the risk of poaching and already poaching numbers on the downfall, from 180 in 2012 to just 29 in 2014.
On a smaller scale but no less impressive, three German conservationists surveying the Dragonfly populations in Rwanda for their research on the status of East African Dragonflies recently discovered that Akagera is home to a much wider variety of Dragonfly species than previously recorded! This kingdom of flying jewels went from 36 to 89 separate species with an estimated 50 still to add. Amongst these discoveries, two species are potentially new to science, and 20 are new to the country.
With so much potential and a strong working relationship between locals and park management, Akagera appears to be a hotspot for conservation success. Visitor numbers grow year on year with Rwandan Nationals comprising of 50% of the visitors including school children on educational visits. With the reintroduction of rhino, Akagera will be Rwanda’s only big five national park, further enhancing the country’s appeal as an international tourism destination.Images ©African Parks/Sean Carter
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Minister and Acehnese leaders declare moratorium on palm oil and mining expansion in the Leuser Ecosystem

Minister and Acehnese leaders declare moratorium on palm oil and mining expansion in the Leuser Ecosystem | Conservation Success | Scoop.it
Minister and Acehnese leaders declare moratorium on palm oil and mining expansion in Leuser Ecosystem
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The secret to preserving Namibia's big cats? Big dogs

The secret to preserving Namibia's big cats? Big dogs | Conservation Success | Scoop.it
They maybe man's best friend, but dogs in Namibia have been making a new acquaintance: the cheetah.
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A Hedge Fund Manager Helped Save Siberian Tigers

A Hedge Fund Manager Helped Save Siberian Tigers | Conservation Success | Scoop.it
Investor Whitney Tilson publicized Lumber Liquidators’ use of contaminated wood, driving down the stock of a company that bought timber illegally logged from endangered wildlife habitat.
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Proving the Exception: Coexistence between human and lions is possible

Proving the Exception: Coexistence between human and lions is possible | Conservation Success | Scoop.it
It has been all over the news recently – every headline painting a grim future for wild lions, a future where they could potentially disappear completely. According to a recent study, lion populati…
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A wonderful example of an effective conservation intervention.


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Protected areas DO save wildlife: Just ask these 5 species – Human...

Protected areas DO save wildlife: Just ask these 5 species – Human... | Conservation Success | Scoop.it
New data collected by more than 1,000 camera traps reveals good news for many tropical species.
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Good news from Tadoba reserve: Tiger numbers rising | Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis

Good news from Tadoba reserve: Tiger numbers rising | Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis | Conservation Success | Scoop.it
Good news from Tadoba reserve: Tiger numbers rising - Maharashtra minister for forests Sudhir Mungantiwar said that with Centre's help, the state government has deployed a special tiger protection force which has resulted in ensuring that there is no poaching.
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Protecting pandas shields other species in China

Protecting pandas shields other species in China | Conservation Success | Scoop.it
A study published in the journal Conservation Biology finds that China’s conservation efforts for the giant panda also protect many other species in forest habitats.
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Successful Conservation Efforts Along Florida, Pacific Coasts Recognized in Revised ESA Listing of the Green Sea Turtle :: NOAA Fisheries

Successful Conservation Efforts Along Florida, Pacific Coasts Recognized in Revised ESA Listing of the Green Sea Turtle :: NOAA Fisheries | Conservation Success | Scoop.it

Via Grant W. Graves
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India Reports Nearly 30% Rise in Wild Tiger Population | Stories | WWF

India Reports Nearly 30% Rise in Wild Tiger Population | Stories | WWF | Conservation Success | Scoop.it
The population of wild tigers in the country increased to 2,226 in 2014 from 1,706 in 2010, according to the new report. This growth is largely due to better management and improved protection. The Status of Tigers in India, 2014 report also underscores the importance of tigers maintaining core habitats for breeding, habitat connectivity and protection from poaching.
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New Delhi | Number of lions, tigers, elephants increased over the year:Min | The Echo of India

News (without Pic) | Number of lions, tigers, elephants increased over the year:Min | New Delhi | The population of wild animals like lions, tigers and elephants have increased over the years across the country, Rajya Sabha was informed last week. "Estimates of population of major wild animals indicate that there has been an increase in their numbers. The number of Asiatic lion has increased from 304 in 1995 to 523 in 2015, while that of tiger from 1,411 in 2006 to 2,226 in 2014 and of elephant
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